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Cabo del Gado, Moz

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11 September 2009, 01:59
SGraves155
Cabo del Gado, Moz
Dates: Aug 6-25, 2009
Outfitter/PH: Willie van Deventer, Muangaza Safaris---his first season at his new camp in Meleuco area,

Booked and video'd by Gerri DuPreez (former SA PH #0011)

Game Hunted: elephant, lion, buffalo, sable, kudu

Game taken: none

Game seen: several sable over 40", several nice kudu bulls, zebra, buffalo, warthog, grysbok, duiker,

Tracks seen: elephant (daily), lion (rarely), leopard

Other animals seen or heard: bushbuck, jackal, civet, genet, baboon, samango monkey, vervet monkey, puff adder, mamba, lion

Main Problem: the area had been poached, as usual, where there had been no Safari Camp nearby. the game was at least 1 KM off the roads, and it was in constant awareness for man.

No one had trophy hunted the area, and there were good trophies far back, but they were better at spotting us than we were them. Buffalo were in the jess by 8am. We got to within 10-20 yds of them a couple of times before they busted us.

I went hoping to get a chance at some of the problem lions. There were two folks killed 50 miles north of us while I was there, but we didn't find out about it in time.

Willie was an experienced PH, having gone to school with Nicki Hurt, Robin's brother. He had known Willie Van Dyke, the Kenyan PH, and Gordon Cormack. If he can keep the poachers out for a couple of years, there should be some good hunting there--but Willie is 60 yo. His wife Tia is a fine lady who was frequently left at camp with only an axe to protect her as she prepared our meals.

Will post just some general interest photos.

First three guys in line missed this one:




Old woman at village


water coming up thru solid rock during dry season:


Army ants and elephant dung


Indian Ocean:


baby red duiker bought from natives while headed to airport


month's worht of tobacco: Josay, raimundo, and Carlos. Hassani not pictured


Look-out rock


Little girl:


Happy


Tracker rubbing buffalobeans on nose:


Early morning in village:



Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 02:12
Ed Scarboro
Steve,
I enjoyed meeting you at the airport in Atlanta. I finally got my hunt report posted just the other night. I hope you looked at my leopard under Zimbabwe leopard.

Ed
11 September 2009, 02:36
jetdrvr
Rotten break, Steve. Now I don't feel so bad about not taking a second buffalo and never seeing a wildebeest.
11 September 2009, 02:38
Sevenxbjt
Great pics. Sorry to hear that things didn't go better for you.
11 September 2009, 02:39
SGraves155
One low-spot on the trip was having 4 Portuguese witches try to hex my rifles as they were on the carousel at the airport in Pemba. One countering move was to have the Muslim Iman/Shaman at the village (they seemed partially Moslem and partially animistic) remove the curse. To do so, we had to bring the rifles to the holy tree early in the morning:
Holy Tree:

Clearing leaves from the base:


We supplied a generator for the Muslim shindig:



Pounding grain


village kids

where are we, where are we going?

(digital GPS was broken, twolegged GPS was working perfectly)

More water from rocks:


and our unusual critter:


Lots and lots of walking:



Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 02:47
dogcat
What is that one "unusual" critter? Never seen one before.


Masai Land -2019- Lesser Kudu and Masai Bushbuck
Ethiopia - 2017 -Mountain Nyala
Botswana - 2016 - Tholo Safaris and the Okavango Delta
Cameroon - 2016 – Lord Derby’s Eland and Buffalo
Turkey - 2015 - Bezoar Ibex and Tour
Nambia - 2015 - Father-Son - Eland
Sonora Mexico - 2015 - Desert Bighorn Sheep and Sonoran Mule Deer
British Columbia - 2014- Stone Sheep, Goat and Moose
New Zealand 2014 - Rusa Deer
British Columbia - 2013 - Bighorn Sheep
Zimbabwe 2013- Leopard with Hounds
Namibia 2012 - Lion
CAR 2012 - Lord Derby Eland
Cameroon Rainforest - 2011 - Bongo
Zambia - Nchila Reserve - 2010 - Forest Sitatunga
11 September 2009, 03:13
Russ Gould
Would you care to comment on the confusion regarding White Buffalo Safaris and their role in this hunt, Steve?


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11 September 2009, 03:27
SGraves155
Russ,
White Buffalo Safaris, as I understand it, is the LLC that is a combination of Muangaza Safaris run by Willie and mainly in Meleuco area, plus some areas in Muidume that are at least applied for for Fazendas de Bravo (private hunting game areas) and also areas in Tete and near maputo. Willie's son Jaco is handling the computer side of selling hunts.
Interestingly, the van Deventers have had some good and some very bad luck--in the same year that one son survived a life-threatening head injury, their other son died accidently from electrocution while working for an electrical contractor. Willie has run a wildlife reserve and has hunted extensively in Moz. He grew up in Kenya during the 50's and 60's. Few women would be satisfied like Tia-- living in a tent while awaiting a bore-hole and some permanent buildings. We got our non-drinking water like the elephants got their drinking water---digging into the sand in the dry river-beds.
For Jaco and Willie, Africaans is their first language, but they also speak English and some Swahili. The Government regulations are written in Portuguese, and many of the bureaucrats speak only Portuguese and perhaps some Bantu language or Swahili.

Our water source:


More photos:

Me


Baobab with parasite tree



At Pemba beach. Pemba was Port Amelia under the Portuguese.



Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 06:54
SGraves155
Excellent beer. If one walks 10-12 miles/day, one can safely drink 5-6 beers each evening.


elephant pushed down tree during rainey season. But tracks are fresh and 20".



Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 07:56
SGraves155
Certainly there was some frustration on everyone's part on this hunt. However, If I had been better, quicker, or luckier by only 2-3 seconds on sable, Kudu, buffalo, elephant, and warthog--I would have had a chance at shots on animals that were better than anything I have taken of the same species in the past. Willie, Gerrie, Tia, and Jaco all performed as well as should be expected by me. There were adventures and sites and experiences that made the trip worthwhile for me. IMO, it is possible that they could have an outstanding place to collect any of the above animals within 1-2 years. The crooked bureaucracy of Moz is beyond normal control, and must be planned for in advance, no matter where in Moz one hunts.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 09:02
Michael Robinson
Steve,

Having myself traveled halfway around the world and been shut out, I know it can be tough, yet immensely rewarding at the same time.

All of us with any brains try our best to enjoy our little episodes on earth, and then try our best to learn from them, and then after that go on forward from there.

Hunting is a process.

You sure are a straight up guy, and I would share a camp with you any day and anywhere.

Your photos are priceless.

Thanks for posting this report.


Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
11 September 2009, 09:59
Bahati
quote:
Originally posted by SGraves155:
The crooked bureaucracy of Moz is beyond normal control, and must be planned for in advance, no matter where in Moz one hunts.


Steve

This is not true. The Moz system certainly has it own "unique charateristics", but it is the duty of the outfitter to get to grips with these, handle the matters and keep it away from you. That is after all why he charges you good money - he is supposed to know the ropes already! You seem like a really nice guy coming up a little for a bunch of equally nice and well-meaning guys operating an area that is raw, underdeveloped and not quite ready for quality safaris just yet. Nearly three weeks and nothing taken is ... well, a little heavy to stomach. Yet, I think your attitude is great. Nothing ventured, nothing gained!

I just hope that the greater experience and result was more or less in line with what was promised, your expectation, and the price paid.


Johan
11 September 2009, 14:00
Saeed
Relevant thread on white buffalo safaris.


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11 September 2009, 14:54
JohnDL
It may be surprising to non-hunters, but in Africa there are usually animals where there is hunting, not the other way around. Poachers are very astute in finding areas where they are not likely to be bothered.

In 1991 I was hunting in Tanzania with TGTS. We were flying in to Kizigo (where Saeed is headed!). In the plane, the PH pointed out an area and said that it hadn't been hunted and that he had found an old logging road and thought we could get in there. Was I game? Of course, says I.

We found the logging road and made it into this area. Absolutely beautiful area. Verdant, plenty of water, absolutely gorgeous. What little game we saw was more skittish than I've ever seen. A few zebra who would take off like scalded cats at 500 meters. It was very clear that without hunters in this area the poachers had had a field day.

Many of the TZ outfitters now fund their own anti-poaching units. Unfortunate necessity. No doubt this adds expense to hunting with these outfitters but one is more likely to have a good hunt.
11 September 2009, 18:45
SGraves155
quote:
Originally posted by dogcat:
What is that one "unusual" critter? Never seen one before.


dogcat, that is a de-quilled porky. I wish we had tried to buy it so we could eat it.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 18:50
ghostbird
Sorry to hear about your hunt... but thanks for sharing the photos, very nice.
Andy


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11 September 2009, 19:18
Worth
Could you tell me why the tracker was rubbing a buffalo bean on his nose?
Thanks.
Dabney
11 September 2009, 19:46
dogcat
quote:
Originally posted by SGraves155:
quote:
Originally posted by dogcat:
What is that one "unusual" critter? Never seen one before.


dogcat, that is a de-quilled porky. I wish we had tried to buy it so we could eat it.


Steve,
You must be from South Louisiana if you want to eat that funny looking thing.


Masai Land -2019- Lesser Kudu and Masai Bushbuck
Ethiopia - 2017 -Mountain Nyala
Botswana - 2016 - Tholo Safaris and the Okavango Delta
Cameroon - 2016 – Lord Derby’s Eland and Buffalo
Turkey - 2015 - Bezoar Ibex and Tour
Nambia - 2015 - Father-Son - Eland
Sonora Mexico - 2015 - Desert Bighorn Sheep and Sonoran Mule Deer
British Columbia - 2014- Stone Sheep, Goat and Moose
New Zealand 2014 - Rusa Deer
British Columbia - 2013 - Bighorn Sheep
Zimbabwe 2013- Leopard with Hounds
Namibia 2012 - Lion
CAR 2012 - Lord Derby Eland
Cameroon Rainforest - 2011 - Bongo
Zambia - Nchila Reserve - 2010 - Forest Sitatunga
11 September 2009, 20:00
SGraves155
quote:
Originally posted by Worth:
Could you tell me why the tracker was rubbing a buffalo bean on his nose?
Thanks.
Dabney


I think he was just being funny. Maybe the itching doesn't happen on the tip of the nose? He was very careful about wiping his fingers after touching the bean.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 20:08
Saeed
"I went hoping to get a chance at some of the problem lions"

Did you book a PAC lion hunt with them?

If you read the other thread you might see that clients are NOT allowed to shoot these animals.

Any clarification from you would be much appreciate it, as we all seem to be a bit confused on this matter.


www.accuratereloading.com
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11 September 2009, 20:30
DBird
From what I've picked up on AR regarding this operation and licenses and quotas, maybe it's a good thing that you didn't shoot anything on a 19 day safari.


"Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties."

Abraham Lincoln
11 September 2009, 20:36
SGraves155
MR,
thanks, that's a mighty fine compliment.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 22:37
TerryR
I am normally reluctant to get involved in finger pointing over internet reports, but I am somewhat stunned by your attitude regarding this "hunt". From what I gather you were sold a hunt for elephant, lion, buffalo, sable and kudu. Spent 19 days in the field and didn't even get a shot at one of your desired trophies. The reason is that you were taken to an area that was so heavily poached that the animals were either scarce or so skittish that it was impossible to get close enough to get a shot off. On top of that the camp did not have a bore hole or permanent buildings, essentially a fly camp I assume.
Is it not an outfitter's responsibility to assure that there is a population of game in sufficient quantity so as to give the client a reasonable chance of success? I understand that there is an element of luck in hunting, but being taken to an area that has been poached out does not constitute bad luck, it constitutes fraud. I wasn't there and can only react to your report, but from that it appears to me that you were taken to the cleaners.
11 September 2009, 23:06
Bill C
I think Steve has been on a number of hunts, and not to speak for him, but I think I can understand how he likely feels. Steve pls correct me if I'm off base.

The assumption is he had the time, went into it looking primarily for adventure and something new, and was aware that the probabilities especially on the lion were modest at best. I love the well-equipped camps, don’t get me wrong, but I also long for a taste of raw Africa without all the amenities.

I would expect a low day rate, considering the above…certainly not anything close to the going rates for prime areas/hunts. Now I’m not sure that the hunt is necessarily being sold this way by the operator, and the next guy might be very disappointed if he thinks he is going to score on the big-5 on the cheap, but again I’d bet Steve’s eyes were open going into this.

I am speaking in general terms here, and I am not commenting or passing judgment on the legalities of THIS hunt. Reading the post on the Offered Hunts forum makes my head spin. nilly nilly nilly

Personaly I would not, based on the info now presented on the other forum, hunt with this outfitter.

Thanks for posting the pictures and report Steve, it is interesting as well as thought-provoking. Regards, Bill
11 September 2009, 23:26
SGraves155
TerryR,
I went into this hunt knowing several things:
1) it was a new enterprise in an area not previously hunted by Safaris, hence it was almost certainly an area that had been poached.
2) the day rate was $700--about half or less the usual day rate for dangerous game. If and when Willie is able to establish anti-poaching techniques and build some roads, the quality of the hunt will go up, and so will the price.
3)Many(most) camps in remote areas do not have bore-holes. Usually bottled water is used for drinking, and the camp water obtained from rivers/shallow wells/lakes is boiled before consumption in coffee or foods.
4)We were on to fresh elephant tracks several mornings, but we just never closed the gap. We tracked buffalo close enough--just can't shoot through thick jess. I saw 4 sable bulls that I'm sure were over 40", and the largest Kudu bull I've ever seen. The game was there--we just weren't able to get to it. Is being an easy successful hunt more important/better than a difficult unsuccessful one? Perhaps sometimes, anyway.
4) My main hope on this hunt was to get a chance at certain problem lions. The problems recurred while I was there, but communication in that province is very slow outside of Pemba, and we didn't find out, so that hope did not transpire. I can't fault Willie for that.
5) "Reasonable" chances of success were there, in my opinion. If one occasionally sees the animals at a distance or finds fresh tracks frequently, then that, for some, constitutes a reasonable chance.
6) fly-camps can be described in different ways. A base camp that has a water supply of any kind, multiple large tents, several vehicles, generator, kitchen tent,etc. would be very hard to pick up and move in one afternnon, which is what I think of when talking about "Fly-Camps".
7)What is it about my attitude that stuns you?

Addendum:
8) This would have been the hunt from Hell for a first trip.


BillC, you are correct, thanks.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
11 September 2009, 23:35
TerryR
Bill
If the outfitter told Steve that this hunt was iffy, or that it was a new area and he had no idea what the conditions were, than I take back my comments regarding fraud. I still would hope that an outfitter would have done sufficient homework to insure that the area was huntable, but if Steve knew that the situation was questionable and chose to roll the dice, than that is his prerogative. I'm aware that he has been around the block enough times to know what he is doing, that is why I was so surprised to see him seemingly satisfied with what for most people would be a bad hunt. I appreciate the report and pictures and commend him for making the best of the situation and enjoying the ride even if it didn't get him where he may have hoped it would. Accepting that you are embarking on an adventure and simply enjoying the experience is the key to fully appreciating the African experience.

TerryR
11 September 2009, 23:42
TerryR
Steve
My initial read of your report led my to conclude that you didn't get the chance to close for a shot. I guess that I was wrong. I rescind any negative comment regarding the outfitter, and apologize for misinterpreting the hunt. Again, I commend your attitude a lot of people equate success with putting animals on the ground, you obviously appreciate the hunt.

TerryR
11 September 2009, 23:48
SGraves155
quote:
Originally posted by TerryR:
Bill
If the outfitter told Steve that this hunt was iffy, or that it was a new area and he had no idea what the conditions were, than I take back my comments regarding fraud. I still would hope that an outfitter would have done sufficient homework to insure that the area was huntable, but if Steve knew that the situation was questionable and chose to roll the dice, than that is his prerogative. I'm aware that he has been around the block enough times to know what he is doing, that is why I was so surprised to see him seemingly satisfied with what for most people would be a bad hunt. I appreciate the report and pictures and commend him for making the best of the situation and enjoying the ride even if it didn't get him where he may have hoped it would. Accepting that you are embarking on an adventure and simply enjoying the experience is the key to fully appreciating the African experience.

TerryR


Exactly. Smiler

And you were correct about not having a shot opportunity-- every trophy animal I saw had seen us first and was moving out at distance when I saw them. Nothing big gave me two seconds. I had the scope only on one young bull sable, just long enough to know he wasn't a trophy, and on one big bull sable whose vitals were covered by a tree.
I don't want to get into rules and regs and license fees and trophy fees here--there's 3 or 4 pages of it on the other topic, and somehwere in there I've explained my limited understanding.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
12 September 2009, 00:13
TerryR
Shootaway
I disagree. I think that the outfitter has an obligation to get you into an area that has a sufficient population of shootable game, or at least the reasonable expectation that shootable game will be there under normal circumstances. After that it is up to you and the "gods of the hunt". It's hunting, not shooting.

TerryR
12 September 2009, 00:17
Saeed
quote:
My main hope on this hunt was to get a chance at certain problem lions


Would you please clear this one for us.

The way I understand it is that clients CANNOT shoot problem animals in Mozambique?

How can they sell this sort of hunt then??


www.accuratereloading.com
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12 September 2009, 00:49
SGraves155
Saeed,
It is my understanding that there is a different method of allocating licenses on the Fazendas de Bravo than on the hunting coutadas. I paid $500 in advance just for the lion license. Had I shot one, the trophy fee would have been $4500 (total $5000, same as the license in the coutadas). The Fazendas are leased by individuals from tribal lands, and the lease is for 49 years. The Lease holder of this Fazenda was Willie, the PH.

There is no rule that I have heard of that prevents clients from shooting a definite problem animal. There may be some regulations against/regarding the selling of PAC hunts, but I'm not sure what it is.

Cabo Delgado is 77,000+ sq Km--roughly the size of South Carolina. At any one time there may only be 2-5 people outside Pemba who have a legal rifle--and half of them may be clients. If a village really had a problem lion that was eating people, then they would contact the district administrator, in our case the Meluco Administrator(who personally came to our camp to inspect all of our licenses and permits, and to inspect the camp for continued operation) and the administrator would contact the closest PH. The Government actually contracts with Willie to help out on PAC animals. If he had a client with him and they shot an animal he had been summoned to shoot, do you think anyone is going to worry whether the PH's bullet or the client's bullet ended their problem? What would they do for a client if they refused to let him go with the PH? Makes no sense, especially if the client already has a license.

The problem with PAC hunts is that trophy animals that were no-where near a village were being shot, without a license, and using PAC as an excuse.
In 2004 I booked a hunt thru Wendell to hunt at Piet Hougaard's camp in Moz. One evening, we spotted a decent bull elephant on the way back to camp. While I was attempting to get close for pictures, the PH and the Game Scout talked, and the Game Scout decided that this animal was on the trail into the village fields, and that the village had major elephant problems, and that it should be shot as a PAC. They whistled to me and got me back to the truck for the rifle. After killing the animal, it was our duty to notify the local villagers. It was the main village's responsibility to hold the tusks and other villages held the hide for the Government truck, which came around monthly.

In short, if the PH in agreement with either 1)the Game Scout, or 2)the village chief or assistant chief, or 3)the District Administrator says you should shoot, then shoot.


Steve
"He wins the most, who honour saves. Success is not the test." Ryan
"Those who vote decide nothing. Those who count the vote decide everything." Stalin
Tanzania 06
Argentina08
Argentina
Australia06
Argentina 07
Namibia
Arnhemland10
Belize2011
Moz04
Moz 09
12 September 2009, 01:56
bwanamrm
Steve,
You do have an adventure-keen itch that needs to be scratched on occasion, my friend. Kudos to you for taking such an excursion and knowing that you might come home with nothing but memories of a "wild" and beautiful Africa and some neat pictures! And being perfectly satisfied with the results....


On the plains of hesitation lie the bleached bones of ten thousand, who on the dawn of victory lay down their weary heads resting, and there resting, died.

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch...
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!
- Rudyard Kipling

Life grows grim without senseless indulgence.
12 September 2009, 02:02
OldHandgunHunter
Love your attitude! Shutouts can be a bummer, but if you actually hunt, they happen and they are what make the successes so sweet.

I've actually enjoyed many of my less successful hunts more than I have some of the real trophy producers -- for me, it's about the challenge, not the blood. It sounds like we may have that in common.

Great pictures!


When you get bored with life, start hunting dangerous game with a handgun.
12 September 2009, 09:01
jdollar
to spend 19 days and at least $20,000(with airfare)hunting anywhere in Africa and come home with just pictures and memories is truly mind boggling. i would not have thought it possible. i am glad you enjoyed it but i would have i hard time explaining to my wife such an expensive camping trip.
12 September 2009, 10:51
megsdad
jdollar, Must be the Fresno heat!!!!!
12 September 2009, 13:40
Scottyboy
quote:
Originally posted by jdollar:
to spend 19 days and at least $20,000(with airfare)hunting anywhere in Africa and come home with just pictures and memories is truly mind boggling. i would not have thought it possible. i am glad you enjoyed it but i would have i hard time explaining to my wife such an expensive camping trip.


Agreed 100%.. There's no way I could be happy with that.
12 September 2009, 14:51
Code4
At least you had beer. dancing
12 September 2009, 16:30
freischuetz
quote:
Originally posted by SGraves155:
..... The crooked bureaucracy of Moz is beyond normal control, and must be planned for in advance, no matter where in Moz one hunts.


This statement is not correct you find crooked bureaucracy only if people a prepared to corrupt other people! None of us deny that we got a lot of “red Tape” to overcome but that is not unusual for Africa.

I object strongly, you don’t have to deal with any crooked bureaucracy if booking with a legal serious Mozambican safari operator!

Serious safari operators interested in long-term business in the country of operation do not accept crooked bureaucracy nor do they accept incompetence or ignorance and deal with it accordingly!

We have enough serious operators in Mozambique which are as good or better as you find in any other country regrettably we also have some not so desirable suit case operators floating around.

These less desirable “operators” are the ones who need and created crooked bureaucracy in the first place.

Cheers
13 September 2009, 04:40
jdollar
the crap about a crooked Moz bureaucracy is just that-CRAP. follow the rules, obey the law and things are OK. sure a little 'GRATUITY" helps, but at the end of the day,legal operators do just fine.
13 September 2009, 04:42
jdollar
quote:
Originally posted by megsdad:
jdollar, Must be the Fresno heat!!!!!
what has our stifling heat got to do with my post. $20,000 for a camping/hiking excursion is still $20,000