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safari press has the north american perfect shot field book.Can anybody tell me if there is a moose illustration of the vitals.I called and the sales guy wasn't 100 % sure yes or no. If not would like to be directed to a reference.Thanks
 
Posts: 323 | Location: northcentral mt | Registered: 25 May 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have the full size edition by C. Bodington.

The moose section shows two illustrations of the same moose. The moose is quartering away at a slight angle from broadside.

One illustration shows skeleton, lungs, and heart. The other shows aiming points for lung and heart.

Heart is low and forward.

Hope this helps.

BH63


Hunting buff is better than sex!
 
Posts: 2205 | Registered: 29 December 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If by field book you mean The Perfect Shot: Mini Edition for North America, yes, it covers the moose. There is also The Perfect Shot: Mini Edition II for North America.

You want the top one with the elk on the cover, not the one with the bear on the cover:


 
Posts: 437 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 November 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just curious. Do the two field guides cover different species?

Thanks.

BH63


Hunting buff is better than sex!
 
Posts: 2205 | Registered: 29 December 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posts: 437 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 November 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No, I am okay. I was just curious.

Hvrhunter might want the additional information though.

Thanks.

BH63


Hunting buff is better than sex!
 
Posts: 2205 | Registered: 29 December 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The top book, The Perfect Shot: Mini Edition for North America, has the following chapters:
1. Mule Deer
2. White-tailed Deer
3. American Elk
4. Moose
5. Caribou
6. Pronghorn Antelope

The lower book, The Perfect Shot: Mini Edition II for North America, has the following chapters:
1. Black Bear
2. Grizzly & Alaskan Brown Bear
3. Polar Bear
4. Bison
5. Cougar
6. Rocky Mountain Goat
7. Feral Hog
8. Javelina
9. Muskox
10. Bighorn Sheep
11. Thin-Horned Sheep
12. Wolf
 
Posts: 437 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 November 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hannay
Greatly appreciated that you took the time to check this out for me.The almost wife is going moose hunting in B C mid November and needs a clear understanding where to shoot.
 
Posts: 323 | Location: northcentral mt | Registered: 25 May 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posts: 437 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: 27 November 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tell her to shoot the moose in the same place as a whitetail.

Tell her good luck, and let us know how it goes.
 
Posts: 3406 | Location: Somewhere above Tennessee and below Kentucky  | Registered: 31 July 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am not sure how many animals I have shot.

Certainly several hundreds at least.

Elephants and hippos I have only shot in the head.

Others, from Cape buffalo to impala, I have shot in every part of their anatomy.

Many animals do not oblige by standing broadside, and one has to take any shot offered to him.

Most important part is having a rifle/bullet combination that will reach the vitals in the chest from any angle.

Last month I shot 3 Cape buffalo from the same herd.

First one was the classic broadside, shot through the heart.

Last one was running away.

All died.


www.accuratereloading.com
Instagram : ganyana2000
 
Posts: 52200 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So when a hog or bull elk comes running by, do you have to check the list before you know where to aim...How about just shoot them in the shoulder, center hold, or if at an angle then shoot for the opposite side leg.just in case you can't find your list or forgot where the x goes..They also tell you to shoot cats further forward as the heart lies between the front legs, so what, its a good idea for one shot instant kills to break both shoulders on any animal, a classic behind the shoulder shot will normally allow a 25 to 100 yard run. but its still a decent shot. If you shoot them up the kazoo, you just took out both lungs, the heart and probably a bit of spine, its deadly, but I hear neophites complain about the Texas Heart shot...I guess its kinder to shoot them facing you as that's acceptable, but its the same shot form either end..OH well!!

Keep it simple..it just ain't that hard to figure.


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 36453 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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All this is useful to a point. But there are other very important factors to consider as well.

The well known ones like "aim for the exit hole", "Aim for the opposite shoulder", "aim through the animal and not just at it" are always valid. They take into consideration the factors of quartering shots and other 3 dimensional factors that can lead to poor shot placement.

It is very rare to get a perfect side on shot on level ground. It might happen on an open plain when shooting at some PG or even a herd buffalo. But the chances of having uneven ground are very high. Even the animal changing its weight from one leg to the other will have an impact on aim point.

The 2 book cover above are good examples. That elk is absolutely side on but its left legs are positioned to create an illusion that it may be a quartering shot. I would have the cross hairs a bit further forward.

Shooting at animals that are on the ground like ungulates chewing cud are very tricky. I've shot fallow deer in such a position down hill at 325 meters and aimed for the upper shoulder to hit the top of the heart.

On another occasion the deer was on a steep hill side at 250 meters+ (not ranged & it was a bit above me and across 2 gullies of a forked stream - it could have been 350 meters for all I know). Again I aimed for the upper shoulder and the TSX bullet broke both leg bones as well as centered the heart. The slope, the position of legs and body weight distribution were in play.

Looking at the various videos of Saeed's I am amazed at how many animals run for so long with big lumps of lung tissue blown out of the body cavity. That never seems to happen with a leopard.


"When the wind stops....start rowing. When the wind starts, get the sail up quick."
 
Posts: 10581 | Location: New Zealand | Registered: 02 July 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well I think the subject is over thought to a ridiculas degree, I have shot hundreds of animals and more, and even today I aim for the mass and pull the trigger..In many many cases the animal is in the bush and leaving, on the open plains they are running..no time for this non sence..Just my opinion, and expect others to do the same, no agreement is required on my post! sofa


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 36453 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Reminds of that bullshit called THE PAYLINE!

By Hallamour!

Never made any since to me!


www.accuratereloading.com
Instagram : ganyana2000
 
Posts: 52200 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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