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The best gloves for cold?
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quote:
Originally posted by dian1:
I too have frostbitten fingers in the past. Feels like I hit my fingertips with a hammer after they get cold.
I wear fleece gloves inside of a leather gauntlet type mitten. Inside the fleece gloves, on the back part of my hand, I put a "Hottie" hand warmer. Just that little bit of heat when it's very cold makes all the difference.

Years ago my hunting friends an I started using fleece liners inside our sleeping bags. My wife sewed the liner for my bag like this: folded the fleece material in half, sewed the bottom to close the area like a sock on my feet, then up about knee high and stopped there. The rest of this liner is open since you don't want a zipper in there. Just sew the liner around the bottom to about knee high, with an upper body that is roomy enough to cover you chest with plenty of room left (remember no zipper on your upper body, just two flaps or sides like a blanket). You won't believe how much warmer you will be inside your sleeping bag. A thin layer of fleece is all you need, because heavy fleece material is just too hot and will make you sweat. I only use the liner when it's below freezing and don't have a heater in my tent.
 
Posts: 407 | Location: Alaska | Registered: 20 November 2013Reply With Quote
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Outdoor research mittens are the catz azz. They are pricey, but very warm with extended cuffs. -20 in MT proved their worth.
 
Posts: 352 | Location: Washington State, USA | Registered: 29 July 2012Reply With Quote
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King of the Mountain wool gloves out of Wyoming. Pricey but well worth it.
 
Posts: 899 | Location: Bonita, Ca. | Registered: 01 August 2007Reply With Quote
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Light pair of pure silk gloves and then seal skin or caribou mitts.


______________________________________________

The power of accurate observation is frequently called cynicism by those who are bereft of that gift.



 
Posts: 1400 | Location: North of the 49th. | Registered: 21 July 2006Reply With Quote
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I use Hestra Hunters Gauntlets when it's very cold in the Scottish Mountains or in the Alps. Sometimes with a pair of slik liners on under neath. Our biggest problem is that it is often only a few degrees below so its damp and wet.

https://hestragloves.com/sport...-gauntlet-czone/861/
 
Posts: 693 | Location: Scotland | Registered: 28 February 2011Reply With Quote
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Picture of Cold Trigger Finger
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As to the original ?
I find it's not hard to keep my old hands warm IF I keep my core warm. I also agree with Cal and others that advocate mitts. Having worked a lot in extreme cold I'm pretty big on hand warmers.
But most of keeping hands warm is keeping warm blood pumping into the hands. With me ,my hands get cold before my core get up to temp. Then I have to get them warmed up. Once I get them warmed up they are gtg for the day if I pay attention.

It depends a lot on how cold a conditions she will be in and if she is willing to layer up her core and eat foods that make good heat. If all someone eats is salads and drinks pop. They are gonna freeze.
My wife has a saying. If I'm warm , she is cold . If she is warm I'm Hot.
My wife wears insulated coveralls. Carhart, Refridgewear and the Cabela's Trans Alaska suit6.
Which sadly is no longer made.
When her's wears out I'll probably get her a Canada Goose Riggers Coverall.


Phil Shoemaker : "I went to a .30-06 on a fine old Mauser action. That worked successfully for a few years until a wounded, vindictive brown bear taught me that precise bullet placement is not always possible in thick alders, at spitting distances and when time is measured in split seconds. Lucky to come out of that lesson alive, I decided to look for a more suitable rifle."
 
Posts: 1890 | Location: Eastern Central Alaska | Registered: 15 July 2014Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Heym SR20:
I use Hestra Hunters Gauntlets when it's very cold in the Scottish Mountains or in the Alps. Sometimes with a pair of slik liners on under neath. Our biggest problem is that it is often only a few degrees below so its damp and wet.

https://hestragloves.com/sport...-gauntlet-czone/861/


Ha!

I was going to comment on my Hestra gloves. I bought some hipster looking Hestra gloves at a Fjallraven store in Boulder last year for work/travel. Not very heavy gloves, but man do they keep my hands warm. I have no doubt the ones above would do the trick based on these.


"Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid" -- Ronald Reagan

Want to make just about anything work better? Keep the government as far away from it as possible, then step back and behold the wonderment and goodness.
 
Posts: 2531 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 05 April 2006Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Milo:

Cheapest is if you can buy from locals in the villages, but I'm guessing you're not planning to go to northwest arctic any time soon.


I’m up here in Barrow and I have located a local woman who has an outstanding reputation. She does a lot of work with seal skin. PM me if you want her contact info.


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the
punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 5504 | Location: The North Slope, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by JBrown:
quote:
Originally posted by Milo:

Cheapest is if you can buy from locals in the villages, but I'm guessing you're not planning to go to northwest arctic any time soon.


I’m up here in Barrow and I have located a local woman who has an outstanding reputation. She does a lot of work with seal skin. PM me if you want her contact info.


Might be looking for a cribbage board.
 
Posts: 68 | Location: Eagle River, Alaska | Registered: 24 February 2003Reply With Quote
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But most of keeping hands warm is keeping warm blood pumping into the hands. With me ,my hands get cold before my core get up to temp. Then I have to get them warmed up. Once I get them warmed up they are gtg for the day if I pay attention.


Agreed. My problem is that first hour of not getting the hands warm and then sitting in the dark. I have a good set of Surplus Mittens with Wool liners but I am not smart enough to wear them hunting it seems. Was out a -19 wind chill a couple of New Years days ago here in KS and my son said, "Why are we out here again?" "Tradition" says I. "It's New Years. This is what we do."
Maybe this year I'll actually wear the mittens.


"The liberty enjoyed by the people of these states of worshiping Almighty God agreeably to their conscience, is not only among the choicest of their blessings, but also of their rights."
~George Washington - 1789
 
Posts: 1672 | Location: Where God breathes life into the Amber Waves of Grain and owns the cattle on a thousand hills. | Registered: 20 August 2002Reply With Quote
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