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D. Nelson's Zim & Bots Safaris '07
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Zimbabwe:
Hunt Dates: August 10-Sept 3, 2007
Outfitter: The African Safari Company
PH: Ian Gloss
Concession: Makuti, Nyakasanga Camp
Species taken (self): Elephant, Leopard, Cape Buffalo bull, Cape Buffalo cow (for bait)
Species taken (by husband): Zebra

Botswana:
Hunt Dates: Sept 3-19, 2007
Outfitter: Johan Calitz Safaris
PH: Terry Palmer
Concession: NG34, Sankuyo Camp
Species taken (by husband): Elephant, zebra

Just returned from two great safaris! We achieved some dreams, not surprisingly, which contained some adrenalin highs, lots of laughs, and fantastic memories.

We traveled British Airlines LAX via London to Johannesburg. Since BA won’t allow firearms checked through to Zimbabwe, we used the services of Air 2000 in Jo’burg. We claimed our guns at the SAPS office rechecked them on to SAA to Harare. According to the charter pilot who transported us from Harare to Lake Kariba, we were his first clients in 3 months who arrived from Jo’burg with all their guns and gear. So we started on a very positive note. My husband and I breezed through customs and immigrations. However, our traveling companion was selected for a very thorough search of both person and luggage…took about 45 minutes.

As I have mentioned on this forum before, my husband is losing his vision to macular degeneration. We own a small “Mom & Pop†Ag business, but we are “fast forwarding†our hunting while he can still participate as a hunter himself. Our first 24 days, spent in Zimbabwe, was my safari and the next 14 days in Botswana was his safari. We were both primarily hunting elephant, but my list also consisted of buffalo, leopard and lion…never connected with a good lion though. I had already taken a big elephant in Botswana in 2004, so my expectations for elephant weren’t going to be greedy.

This was our first safari to Zimbabwe. As others hunters have stated here, the terrain in Makuti is very different than the flood plains of the Okavango, gentle rolling Tanzania, or coastal Mozambique were we have hunted before. This “old lady†was very nervous when it came to the reality of long stalks in mountainous terrain, but I had been doing my share of training to prepare. The weather was cool in the mornings, but hot by mid-day. Ian Gloss, my PH, told me he wasn’t going to kill his client, so our pace was slow enough for me to survive our longer stalks. I used my pre 64 .375 H&H, I call Thelma, with 300 gr. Federal Premium Trophy Bonded Bear Claw and Sledgehammers as appropriate. Our camp was permanent vs. tent. It was about 3 years old and could accommodate 6 hunters. It was located next to a dry river bed, with a huge sausage tree for a canopy. Baboons and vervets frequented camp and just about every night we could hear hyena. Ian proved to be an outstanding PH. He was always positive and informative. I should also add, he is the oldest 36 year old I have ever met. Meaning his hunting and social skills showed much more patience and experience than his years.

The first order of business was to take a buffalo cow and get bait hung. We saw numerous buffalo everyday so selecting and shooting a mature cow without a calf was accomplished the second day.




On day five, my husband took a zebra.




By day seven I had also taken the 8th Cape Buffalo of my hunting career. The stalk of 400 yards took 4 hours and was just an exciting as my first buffalo. I took him at 25 yards from a kneeling position and it was my first 1 shot kill on a Cape Buffalo.





By day eight we had hits on 2 leopard baits and we were feeding lions on another. I am not a “lucky leopard†hunter. My husband has begged me not to hunt leopard since it cuts into “sundowner timeâ€. In 2001 I took my first leopard, but I have spent over 28 unsuccessful days/nights in blinds on previous safaris. So to have two leopards feeding was great. We decided to build a blind where we thought the larger leopard was feeding. We did one morning stint and actually bumped the leopard when we exited the blind. But that evening, I had my leopard. He came at last light right after the typical Francolin flush announced his presence. My shot spined him and we followed up with the shotgun about 30 yards from the bait tree. Much to my husband’s surprise and pleasure, I was back in camp for early dinner. I don’t think I’ll ever take a larger leopard than this one, so I also promised my husband that I am finally done leopard hunting. (That does not rule out lion hunting.)




The hunter at Buzz Charlton’s camp, which shares the Makuti concession with Ian Gloss, was generous enough to contribute a cow elephant he took his first hunting day and later a zebra to our baits. In fact, this hunter was “MJinesâ€, who also wrote a very descriptive and excellent hunt report on this forum. Although neither of us was aware we were AR forum members, I only recognized him from his hunt report posted here as well. Goes to show what a really, fantastic forum this is.

So now I was very pleased with the progression of things. I had Cape Buffalo and Leopard down and still elephant and lion to go and two weeks of hunting remaining. After many hours of mountainous stalks, I had already declined several elephants on Ian’s suggestion. We had seen sable, eland, and small herds of zebra. By day seventeen, I just couldn’t hold out any longer. Or maybe better said, I couldn’t muster the energy for another arduous walk. So when we spotted three bulls not far from camp at about 1:00 PM, I told Ian that I would be happy to shoot any one of the bulls even though they weren’t big tuskers. And, unfortunately, shooting is exactly what I did. I still can’t explain what happened, be it over-confidence, bad shooting, bad shot placement, or simply something which will remain a mystery. After several months of preparation, what appeared to be a very simple 25 yard broadside brain shot, turned into my worst nightmare. My elephant collapsed upon my shot. I was sure he was dead. Then everything became chaotic. The other bulls charged. When my bull got up, I put a full magazine and then some into him. I was certain I had hit vitals, but he ran over a rise and out of sight. In the mean time, Ian was busy shouting down the other two bulls at 10 yards, our trackers and game scout were frantic. As soon as it was safe, we followed spoor. After 3 hours of disappointment, and while the trackers tried to retrace our efforts so far, I waited with the game scout in some shade. Stephen, Ian’s main tracker, appeared carrying ivory. I was ecstatic until he informed me the dead elephant he found wasn’t mine. I was totally depressed again and disgusted with myself for putting everyone through this search. Once I re-hydrated, we continued to follow spoor until dark. The consensus was that my bull probably wouldn’t survive the night. We returned to camp and continued the tracking as soon as it was light. We took other staff from camp to help with the search. I think there were eight of us now. Finally about noon we found him. He appeared dead, but I put another four rounds in him before we checked for reflexes. He hadn’t been dead too long. He was about 2 miles from where I shot him. Seemingly we had covered 10 miles. At this point I swore I was going to quit hunting.



There was lots of alcohol consumed in camp that night. Not really celebration, but relief. We stayed in camp most of the next day. We went to check the lion baits in the late afternoon. I also insisted we recheck the zero of my rifle. It was dead on at 50 yards.

I celebrated my 61st birthday the next night.

At mid-day traveling the main tar road along the concessions border, vultures alerted us to a fresh buffalo kill. We immediately built a blind and as soon as the trackers headed back to the truck a young lion and lioness appeared. He was probably about 4 years old. One day he would be a dandy, but not this year. We returned to the regimen of checking lion baits. We had been feeding two big lionesses and four cubs on one of our baits, hoping that their lion might also appear. Each day the lionesses really gave us a show. They growled, roared and stood their ground around the bait. We had missed one day of baiting. Of course, the day I planned to video tape them, they were gone. We continued to bait the same tree with elephant legs and finally, the long mane hairs and big tracks we had been waiting for were there. This was my last hunting afternoon. We built a blind and sat until dark, but the lion never showed up.

Our air charter pilot was based out of Lake Victoria and spent the night in our camp to facilitate an early departure from Kariba about 7:00 AM It took us about four hours in his Cessna 206 to get to Maun, Botswana. Ian had accompanied us. He was enroute to Lake Victoria, his home and base of operation, to rendezvous with his next clients. We were handed off to our Botswana outfitter during lunch at the Bon Arrivee in Maun. Actually, Terry Palmer, with Johan Calitz Safaris, met us at the airport and we all walked across the street to the restaurant. The difference between Zimbabwe’s regulated economy and Botswana’s plenty was enormous. Not to mention from the mountains to the sandy flats.

The next 14 days were my husband’s elephant safari. We were the last safari of the Botswana big game hunting season. We had hunted with Terry a few times before, so it was a happy, familiar and very comfortable reunion. We departed Maun for concession NG 34, Sankuyo camp about 1-1/2 hours, mostly on dusty roads inside the Okavango Delta buffalo fence. We had never hunted this particular concession. Upon first arrival, the staff greeted us with a song before introductions. Sankuyo is a cozy, immaculately, beautiful tent camp over-looking a small, pumped water hole. (Small herds of zebras regularly watered here, so we were visited almost nightly but hyenas, lions and leopards.) We celebrated my husband’s 68th birthday in camp that first night.

Walking on flat ground seemed easy in comparison to Makuti, but it was hotter and dustier in Botswana now than it had been in Zim. Even the mornings were hot, but generally had a good dry breeze. By 3:00 PM each afternoon it was scorching. There was the large “S Pan†about 5 kilometers from camp. It was the only substantial water within an hour of camp. On one particular evening we encountered over 500 zebra watering at this pan. We followed elephant tracks from here on two mornings before heading to the river. On the third afternoon we found a bull with long, thin tusks, Terry estimated at about 45 lbs. He was alone and would be less dangerous and difficult to stalk. However, it was day 3 and we decided to hold out.

The following day we decided to have lunch in the same area. As we neared a good lunch spot along the river in the shady tree line, we saw the same bull. Again we hashed whether we should take him or not. Neither my husband, nor me, are the type to pass up such opportunities. Terry and I re-examined the bull. The decision was my husband’s, of course. I told him we could get him on this bull, but he wasn’t going to be a monster. He elected to go for it. We did a short stalk and Terry set up the sticks. As we maneuvered my husband into position, the bull’s patience ended and he mock charged. Terry suggested we back off, go have lunch and make another approach. He would leave YaYa, his main tracker, with the elephant to keep us posted if he moved. We had lunch about a mile away and just as we spread the tarp for a nap, YaYa quietly appeared and signaled that the elephant was just a few yards from us and down wind. We quickly loaded up the lunch gear and drove upwind. Then we stalked back, with the wind in our faces. The bull was in the tree line and in the shadows, making it very difficult for my husband to read his anatomy, even at 40 yards. It was apparent the bull was headed to the river, so we just waited until he stepped out of the trees into clear view. Terry set up the sticks at 35 yards and my husband made a perfect heart/lung shot. (Now, I beg everyone’s forgiveness before I go on, but remember we had tracked my wounded elephant for a day.) So, as soon as my husband shot, I opened up with rapid fire of four shots. I’m sure none of my shots really mattered, but I paid insurance for my husband, who has much difficulty relocating his target. The bull didn’t go 20 yards from my husband’s shot. He uses a .416 Rem built by Brockman’s Rifles and used 400 gr. Federal Sledgehammers. We were all ecstatic!!! My husband had taken a beautiful bull and everyone appreciated the difficulty factor. Terry jokingly explained to his trackers why “Madam†had fired her gun. My husband cut off the elephant’s tail. We did the photos, videos, and then returned to camp.




We still had ten hunting days, so Terry sent out for the concession’s final zebra tag. Four days later with an audience of 2- PH’s, 1- apprentice PH, 1- game scout, 2- trackers, and me, my husband made a fantastic ,175 yd. shot and dropped a zebra. This was the perfect way to end the hunting portion of our safari.



With nearly a full week remaining, we visited Moremi Game Reserve, the Kwai River and relished evenings at the “S pan†water hole with sundowners. Our final night was spent at Terry’s home in Maun. We departed for Jo’burg before the onslaught of post-safari depression hit us. Fortunately, we were able to check our luggage and guns all the way through from Maun to LAX. Although, I can’t say I wasn’t concerned that everything would show up in LA, it did.

After 5-1/2 weeks in Africa it’s hard to believe everything we actually did. Each day was so full. I know I have over-looked a lot of important details. But the bottom line is, our PH’s, their staff, the accommodations in both camps were wonderful and we were very fortunate to have had such a great experience. And, by the way, that nonsense I said about quitting hunting!!! Forget it!!!
 
Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Posts: 8687 | Location: Denver - Go Rockies!! | Registered: 12 February 2004Reply With Quote
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Great report! I'm inspired by your quest to spend time with your husband in the field while he has good health. Good for you.

I was in your first camp as well for the first part of my time in Zim this summer before switching over to the camp where Mike was staying. Lots of hills and lots of elephant in that area.

Was Peter still working in camp? He was very pleasant to be around.

Congrats to your husband on his trophies as well.


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Posts: 4124 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 June 2001Reply With Quote
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D., I enjoyed every word. And the pictures are great! Congrats to you & and your husband (and belated Happy Birthday). That's a beauty of a Leopard. David


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Hunting in the Stormberg, Winterberg and Hankey Mountains of the Eastern Cape 2018
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"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading" - Thomas Jefferson

Every morning the Zebra wakes up knowing it must outrun the fastest Lion if it wants to stay alive. Every morning the Lion wakes up knowing it must outrun the slowest Zebra or it will starve. It makes no difference if you are a Zebra or a Lion; when the Sun comes up in Africa, you must wake up running......

"If you're being chased by a Lion, you don't have to be faster than the Lion, you just have to be faster than the person next to you."
 
Posts: 6374 | Location: Tennessee | Registered: 18 December 2006Reply With Quote
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Yukon Delta;

Peter was there when we arrived, he was great.

However, after about a week he departed to take a job out of the hunting industry...can't remember exactly what it was.

Thomas took over and did a splendid job as well.

Regards, D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Very well told. Thanks for that


Frank



"I don't know what there is about buffalo that frightens me so.....He looks like he hates you personally. He looks like you owe him money."
- Robert Ruark, Horn of the Hunter, 1953

NRA Life, SAF Life, CRPA Life, DRSS lite

 
Posts: 11697 | Location: Bakersfield CA. USA | Registered: 30 December 2002Reply With Quote
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I remember well, the various vervets in the big sausage tree by the evening fire (one of them stole a big piece of cheese from the kitchen)...and the hyenas at night down by the water. Also, the thatch roof coming "alive" at night when the generator shut down. I don't know what all was crawling in the ceiling and walls of my room but one night something ate a tube of ointment on the nightstand beside the bed. That can't be good for whatever ate it.

It was a nice camp with good memories.


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Posts: 4124 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 June 2001Reply With Quote
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What a great trip! Thanks for the report and pictures.

I am glad that you and your husband both had an excellent hunt.
 
Posts: 8661 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 24 April 2004Reply With Quote
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D, kudos to you and your husband on a very fine safari... Tell your husband that is one fine elephant and your cat is super also...

Mike


Michael Podwika... DRSS bigbores and hunting www.pvt.co.za " MAKE THE SHOT " 450#2 Famars
 
Posts: 6724 | Location: Wyoming, Pa. USA | Registered: 17 April 2003Reply With Quote
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Darin,

. . . and you said you couldn't write, I have to call BS on that one. Great report and great pictures. I am glad you and your husband had such a wonderful trip. That lion is living a charmed life that's for sure; he has got to be burning through his nine lives.

Congrats again on some wonderful trophies and great memories. It was nice to meet someone with a big smile from home on a dirt road in the middle of nowhere.


Mike

"Living dangerously is twice blessed -- it blesses the moment with elation; it blesses the after-day with warm memories." ~Major P.J. Pretorius

"The man who declares that he is not afraid of elephants is either an ignoramus or a liar." ~Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke

". . . when a man has shot an elephant his life is full." ~John Alfred Jordan

"Danger not only adds zest to all forms of sport, it also tends to sharpen the faculties and to bring into focus all that is to be seen and heard in a forest. Danger, which is understood, and which you are prepared to face, does not in any way distract from pleasure." ~Jim Corbett

". . . he wasn't aware of it then, by the time he left he had been infected by a disease known to many born outside the continent as the call of Africa -- an incurable disease indeed. ~ Peter Stiff

 
Posts: 16710 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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Congratulations, MemSahib, on a doing what needs to be done in the time you have. Got any more pics?

dancing dancing clap clap


Used to be 475Guy add about 2000 more posts
 
Posts: 245 | Registered: 15 September 2007Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by MJines:
That lion is living a charmed life that's for sure; he has got to be burning through his nine lives.


That's true about the lion. He's a survivor. Maybe he should hook up with that female leopard...and produce supercubs.

I forgot to say kudos on the nice cat. They have done very well on leopards this year in Makuti. Yours is very nice.


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Posts: 4124 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 June 2001Reply With Quote
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Veels geluk! Congratulations and thank you for telling and showing us your great hunt. I've been trying to get my wife to hunt with me in Africa but all she's interested in is shopping. Maybe your adventure will be the encouragement and get her to go into the bush too.

Namibiahunter



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Posts: 665 | Location: Oregon or Namibia | Registered: 13 June 2007Reply With Quote
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What a great hunt story! Over a month in Africa hunting is anyones dream. My longest hunt was 24 days and always will be a great memory.
Also, like your buffalo trophy very much, the deep drop and hooks below the boss are the classic look for a buff.

Great reporting and congratulations on a sucessful hunt.

Dak
 
Posts: 495 | Location: USA | Registered: 25 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Congratulations on another great hunt, D. Always impressed with your drive to help your husband achieve his hunting goals while you can both enjoy them! Good luck on your future hunts.

And what a way to celebrate your 61st birthday!


On the plains of hesitation lie the bleached bones of ten thousand, who on the dawn of victory lay down their weary heads resting, and there resting, died.

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch...
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!
- Rudyard Kipling

Life grows grim without senseless indulgence.
 
Posts: 6803 | Location: Victoria, Texas | Registered: 30 March 2003Reply With Quote
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Congratulations on a great hunt. Thanks for sharing it with us.Come May I'll be eating at Bon Arrivee. Can't wait.
 
Posts: 1903 | Location: Greensburg, Pa. | Registered: 09 August 2002Reply With Quote
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That is a great hunt and better report!
 
Posts: 2711 | Location: FL | Registered: 18 September 2007Reply With Quote
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D,

Congratulations to you and your husband on a great hunt and a FANTASTIC hunting report. I think you missed your calling in life, you should have been an outdoor writer.

Once again, congratulations and what a way to celebrate your birthdays!!!!


Kathi

kathi@wildtravel.net
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"The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page."
 
Posts: 7954 | Location: Chicago | Registered: 23 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Thank you everyone for the kind words...what a supportive and great group you are!
--------------

quote:
Also, the thatch roof coming "alive" at night when the generator shut down. I don't know what all was crawling in the ceiling and walls of my room but one night something ate a tube of ointment on the nightstand beside the bed. That can't be good for whatever ate it.
yukondelta

Funny you should mention that. Something was taking big chunks out of our bar soap each day.
I don't think soap is good to eat either!
--------------

Best regards, Darin (horrible name for a woman)
 
Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Maybe it was Peter?


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Posts: 4124 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 June 2001Reply With Quote
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I am glad Bryan elected not to share with me the fact that something was crawling around in the tent at night snacking on antibacterial ointments. It was bad enough to know about the leopard that walks around the camp at night. I did see some spiders that could take a couple of .375 rounds and still make it off into the bush.


Mike

"Living dangerously is twice blessed -- it blesses the moment with elation; it blesses the after-day with warm memories." ~Major P.J. Pretorius

"The man who declares that he is not afraid of elephants is either an ignoramus or a liar." ~Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke

". . . when a man has shot an elephant his life is full." ~John Alfred Jordan

"Danger not only adds zest to all forms of sport, it also tends to sharpen the faculties and to bring into focus all that is to be seen and heard in a forest. Danger, which is understood, and which you are prepared to face, does not in any way distract from pleasure." ~Jim Corbett

". . . he wasn't aware of it then, by the time he left he had been infected by a disease known to many born outside the continent as the call of Africa -- an incurable disease indeed. ~ Peter Stiff

 
Posts: 16710 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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This is a good illustration that what you don't know CAN hurt you. I admit to lowering the bug screen and hoping that "whatever" wouldn't fall through the top of it onto my face. I would hate to have Peter (or Charles Helm) see me go screaming through camp like a little girl. Seriously, what kind of thing eats antibacterial cream and climbs vertical concrete walls? Nothing I want on my face, thank you very much.

This is an appropriate place to remind you that some things that happen in camp should stay in camp.


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Posts: 4124 | Location: Texas | Registered: 18 June 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by MJines:
I am glad Bryan elected not to share with me the fact that something was crawling around in the tent at night snacking on antibacterial ointments. It was bad enough to know about the leopard that walks around the camp at night. I did see some spiders that could take a couple of .375 rounds and still make it off into the bush.


Padenga took care of the giant African field mouse for me, which just left a few of my friends in the tent, all but one of which were gone after one day:







[Click images to enlarge.]
 
Posts: 8661 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 24 April 2004Reply With Quote
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Great report and great pics!
 
Posts: 14225 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Darin,

Do not know if you heard the "final chapter" in the lion hunting story in Makuti. Apparently they did fill the tag on the lion this season. The hunter was an elderly gentleman, in his 80's, a World War II veteran that was on his final safari to Africa. Sounds like at least a deserving hunter got the lion. Thought you might want to know. Hope all is well.


Mike

"Living dangerously is twice blessed -- it blesses the moment with elation; it blesses the after-day with warm memories." ~Major P.J. Pretorius

"The man who declares that he is not afraid of elephants is either an ignoramus or a liar." ~Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke

". . . when a man has shot an elephant his life is full." ~John Alfred Jordan

"Danger not only adds zest to all forms of sport, it also tends to sharpen the faculties and to bring into focus all that is to be seen and heard in a forest. Danger, which is understood, and which you are prepared to face, does not in any way distract from pleasure." ~Jim Corbett

". . . he wasn't aware of it then, by the time he left he had been infected by a disease known to many born outside the continent as the call of Africa -- an incurable disease indeed. ~ Peter Stiff

 
Posts: 16710 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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Thanks Mike;

You must have been reading my mind!!!

Glad to know the tag was filled...do you know the quality of the lion? I'll have to email Ian and see if I can get any more details.

Best regards, Darin
 
Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Darin,

I understand that it was an old male, other than that I have none of the specifics in terms of measurements. Apparently, it took a while to get the lion since the gentleman was having trouble finding the lion through the scope. Hope I have the energy to go to Africa well into my 80's. More power to him.


Mike

"Living dangerously is twice blessed -- it blesses the moment with elation; it blesses the after-day with warm memories." ~Major P.J. Pretorius

"The man who declares that he is not afraid of elephants is either an ignoramus or a liar." ~Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke

". . . when a man has shot an elephant his life is full." ~John Alfred Jordan

"Danger not only adds zest to all forms of sport, it also tends to sharpen the faculties and to bring into focus all that is to be seen and heard in a forest. Danger, which is understood, and which you are prepared to face, does not in any way distract from pleasure." ~Jim Corbett

". . . he wasn't aware of it then, by the time he left he had been infected by a disease known to many born outside the continent as the call of Africa -- an incurable disease indeed. ~ Peter Stiff

 
Posts: 16710 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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What a great group of trophies. That Buffalo is beautiful, the Leopard, Elephant ... everything is of very good quality.

What a great hunt that must have been.
 
Posts: 6011 | Location: Dallas, TX | Registered: 13 July 2001Reply With Quote
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SWAMBO,

I just read over your report again. I need to say again that was one heck of a safari. Isn't a month plus in the bush an incredible expereince in itself? You guys are quite a pair. See you in Reno!

Mark


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Posts: 11525 | Location: LAS VEGAS, NV USA | Registered: 04 August 2002Reply With Quote
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Thanks for the great report! And it's nice to see a lady-hunter for a change.


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Posts: 282 | Registered: 05 February 2007Reply With Quote
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quote:
I celebrated my 61st birthday the next night.


I don't believe it. You're looking pretty good for 61.


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Bill Stewart / Once you've been amongst them, there is no such thing as too much gun.
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and, God Bless John Wayne. NRA Benefactor Member
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"Elephant and Elephant Guns" $65

red.dirt.elephant@gmail.com
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Hoping to wind up where elephant hunters go.
 
Posts: 17561 | Location: X - Kansas | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Posts: 2259 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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You ladies rock! I love it!
 
Posts: 3284 | Location: Mountains of Northern California | Registered: 22 November 2005Reply With Quote
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D. Nelson - I don't know how I missed your report before now. What a great safari!

Congratulations to you, and that lucky husband of yours, too!


Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
 
Posts: 10515 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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