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Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
 
Posts: 11158 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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Nice
 
Posts: 16540 | Location: wis | Registered: 21 April 2001Reply With Quote
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Very nice.

Mike


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.

Bernard Baruch
 
Posts: 11464 | Location: Cocoa Beach, Florida | Registered: 22 July 2010Reply With Quote
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Yes indeed!


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13789 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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Maybe two decades ago now I did a side by side shoot off between those three models of .455 revolver used by the British in WWI.

Using factory spec 265 grain lead bullet loads cast with my RCBS mould that the guys at RCBS made from the drawings I supplied to them

All in .455 for the British Army. The best of the bunch, overall, was the Webley with the Smith & Wesson HE II (in .455) coming behind it.

The worst was the Colt New Service. Simply the thing in double action "torques" in the hand, it's trigger pull is nowhere near as good as either the Webley or the S & W and the sights are too fine.

In single action mode they all, pretty much, perform as well. Although by far the most accurate always are the S & W revolvers. But in double action the Colt was the one I'd least have liked to have carried.

Simply the Mark VI with its rapid ejection of fired cases and it ability to eject from part fired cylinder only fired cases and its superior sight picture trumps the other two in Spades.
 
Posts: 6760 | Location: United Kingdom | Registered: 18 November 2007Reply With Quote
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Of the three revolvers shown, I would have to say that the Smith and Colt are pretty much equally accurate, and both are more accurate than the Webley - but I have only fired them informally for accuracy in single action mode.

The Webley shown is a 1917 version, and is one of three I have (one each from 1916, 1917 and 1918) that have had their cylinders milled at some time in the past to accept .45 ACP rounds in moon clips or .45 Auto Rim. I agree that the Webley is a great design. I love the top break and simultaneous ejection feature. And all of mine are plenty accurate.

But they have more military and (in some cases) commercial proof and other stampings on them than any other handguns I have ever seen!

I have made spacers for them which allow the firing of Webley .455 Mk. II. They are a blast to shoot. (Apart from the original Webley ammo, still available from Fiocchi, I don't shoot anything in them but mildly loaded .45 ACP or .45 Auto Rim, because of pressure concerns.)

I also have another 1917 Webley that is in absolutely mint condition and that somehow escaped being altered to accept the .45 ACP in moon clips.

The Smith shown is a Model 1917 United States Property marked military revolver in the original .45 ACP with moon clips configuration. It, too, is in mint condition.

The Colt New Service shown was originally chambered in Webley .455 Mk. II, but at some time in the past, the chambers were bored out to accept .45 Colt. The barrel was originally stamped ".455 Eley" (not sure why Colt did that) but when it was bored out, the last "5" and "Eley" were (poorly) buffed off.

It will still chamber and fire the Webley rounds, in addition to .45 Colt, and is very accurate with both. The rear sight groove in the top strap has been filed, and widened, to the right. Whoever did it improved the sight picture and zeroed the pistol besides. It shoots dead on with everything I have shot in it.

I also have another Colt on the New Service frame, but that one is the Model 1917 military variety. Made for the US government, just like the Smith.

I love shooting them all.

The Allies were well-armed in the handgun department during the Great War (especially when one considers the use of the Model 1911 semi-automatic pistol by US forces).

There is no beating a .45 caliber revolver or pistol for self-defense, or offense!


Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
 
Posts: 11158 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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I have an S+W 2nd model HE in 45 LC that is stamped w/ the lend-lease glyphs that is quite accurate. I had a 1917 Colt that was chambered in 455 Eley that I gave to my preacher who had the cylinder bored to accept 45 ACP W/ clips. Not sure if that was wise but it's done now.


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13789 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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