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Synthetic Stock Question
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Asking if there is a Synthetic Stock option out there suitable for a Left Hand Sako M591 ?
This model is discontinued so not expecting ready availability of a specifically inletted stock but maybe there is something that would work with a little inlet remodelling or glass bedding.
My rifle is lovely and a delight to shoot ( .243W ) but I'm interested in reducing the weight by replacing the original wooden stock. I use this only on walking hunts and at 4.15 kg / 9.17 lb. ( incl. scope, rings & sling ) it becomes somewhat noticeable after a few hours.
Thankyou for any advice offered.



Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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You're not going to make much difference with a lighter stock, even if you could find one since most of the weight is in the barrel and action.

You might be able to trim 6 oz off with the lightest synthetic if one were available, but the 591 was made for a very short length of time so there is little incentive for manufacturers to make a replacement for the relatively few that are out there. Especially in left hand.

You could get about as much weight reduction by hollowing out the buttstock and forearm, but it will still be less than a quarter of a pound. I'm afraid that as long as you've got a barrel as long and heavy as that one you're just going to have to pack around lots of weight.
 
Posts: 12963 | Location: Henly, TX, USA | Registered: 04 April 2001Reply With Quote
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A member here was kind enough to point me to Accuflite Arms who have McMillan stocks suitable for the M591 action, and in Left Hand. But this stock weighs close to 2 lb and while lighter than the Sako wooden stock would only reduce total rifle weight to 3.93 kg ( 8.66 lb. ). Still too heavy. I have a Sako AV .270W on which I put a new 24 inch barrel and a NZ made Carbon Fibre stock, bringing total weight ( Scope, Rings, Sling, Sling Studs, Scope Cover ) to 3.65 Kg ( 8.04 lb.). This is very comfortable to carry. A worthwhile difference is the .270W barrel is fluted which certainly shaved off some gms. In hindsight I should also have done this with the .243W barrel.
I agree there are few M591's out there and likely no other after market stock options. Also agree that as long as I want to use this rifle I will have to lug the weight around. It could be worse but I think I'll keep an eye open for a tidy, used Tikka in .243W that I can use as a lighter weight alternative.


Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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Look up Wildcat customs of Canada Good people and they make a stock that is 16 ounces unfinished.
They no longer import to the US but not sure if they are shipping to Kiwi's or not.
Most of the popular synthetic stocks are as heavy or heavier than the wood you have on it.
 
Posts: 5595 | Location: Eastern plains of Colorado | Registered: 31 October 2005Reply With Quote
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Watching this. I also has a model 591 hernia machine. The rifle is going nowhere in my case because it is superbly accurate.
 
Posts: 909 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 25 January 2008Reply With Quote
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Most of your weight is in the barrel. Try to get a carbon fiber wrapped barrel and replace what you have. As has been eluded, take a rasp and put the stock on a diet. Over 30 years ago, Sako actioned were only inletted by Mcmillan. You can try to contact them direct. Personally, I wouldn’t waste the money. Other synthetic stock makers were not producing that inlet on a regular bases. You can try MPI or Brown $$$. Best of luck to you.
 
Posts: 974 | Location: Brooksville, FL. | Registered: 01 August 2007Reply With Quote
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quote:
Snellstrom
posted 10 July 2022 19:40
Look up Wildcat customs of Canada Good people and they make a stock that is 16 ounces unfinished.
They no longer import to the US but not sure if they are shipping to Kiwi's or not.
Most of the popular synthetic stocks are as heavy or heavier than the wood you have on it.


Thankyou Snellstrom. Currently in conversation with Wildcat and discussing what's possible. A bit to work through. One good thing is shipping to NZ is doable. Cheers.


Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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mlfguns
posted 12 July 2022 09:31
Most of your weight is in the barrel. Try to get a carbon fiber wrapped barrel and replace what you have. As has been eluded, take a rasp and put the stock on a diet. Over 30 years ago, Sako actioned were only inletted by Mcmillan. You can try to contact them direct. Personally, I wouldn’t waste the money. Other synthetic stock makers were not producing that inlet on a regular bases. You can try MPI or Brown $$$. Best of luck to you.


Agree the barrel could be lighter. At this stage I don't plan to change it as accuracy is great and it's good for a few thousand rounds yet ( I hope ). I looked into McMillan but little useful weight saving with their stock. Other makers are few. Limiting factors are Left Hand and a discontinued Sako model. Brown would make one but as you say $$$.
Woodworking the stock would reduce weight but in our environment a synthetic make sense, if something suitable can be found. Talking to Wildcat Composites in Canada. A glimmer of light there - possibly....??
Whatever occurs as the solution is going to be spendy. I know upfront it will involve more cost than is sensible, but what the hell. Sometimes that's the cost of happiness.


Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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miles58
posted 12 July 2022 00:55
Watching this. I also has a model 591 hernia machine. The rifle is going nowhere in my case because it is superbly accurate.


rotflmo rotflmo Yes, hernia machine describes it well. I always start a walk very happy to carry this rifle and finish thinking I must put it on a diet. Although now not on the original Sako barrel it's still a great shooter. No plans to sell this rifle, ever !
Some of my loads:







Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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As another lefty, I understand your dilemma. You can turn the barrel contour down and or flute and you’ll realize some weight savings. Over all it’s the same rifle with it’s full sentimental value. The worst you’ll have to do is fill in the barrel contour gap with some fiberglass.
In the States, you can pick up a LH Ruger American in .243 win. For $450-520. It’s synthetic and a tack driver. Very light weight. You can hunt with either depending on your hunt. You’ll be miles ahead financially. In fact, you can buy two of those rifles for what that synthetic stock is going to cost you.
 
Posts: 974 | Location: Brooksville, FL. | Registered: 01 August 2007Reply With Quote
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I took a different approach, I got a L-461, fwt. custom barrel, 20 inches, 6/223 custom wood stock, 5-3/4 lbs and shoots .280 average for 20 groups..

Have you consider turning the barrel down to 550 at the muzzle and 20 inches, you wont lose hardly any velocity but lots of weight and perhaps cutting the wood down, drilling out the butt, the usual stuff to slim one down..Just my 2 bits, you have no other choice to lighten one up and thats removing weight..plastic or wood makes little difference..


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 39711 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With Quote
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mflguns persuaded me. His, or her, suggestion was the most sensible route in economical terms so I ordered a Ruger American Predator, which is supplied in .243W Left Hand, and picked it up today. Weight wise it's much nicer to heft and I really like the slender pistol grip which is nicely sized for my small hands. It cycles a little roughly and I was disappointed with the condition of the bore which I scoped but probably shouldn't have. But, yes, one gets what one pays for and I can't complain about the cost. A number of other features are quite interesting. Ruger designed this model well but it's obviously made to a price point which shows in the finished product.
I think I'll spend a bit of time tomorrow scrubbing the bore with KG2 Bore Polish which might knock a little roughness off some edges before drawing up a list of the first handloads I'll make up to get things started. I just hope it shoots.
Some pics of the rifle and bore.
Thanks for all the advice and suggestions guys. Appreciated.



Bore pitting, in several places


Rough edges in Leade / Throat. Scars from cutting tools ?


Machining marks (?) and surface rust from storage ( no big deal )


Not impressed with this roughness near the crown. Hope it doesn't cause accuracy issues. The threads came from a couple of dry patches I ran through.


Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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mr. 06-king: I've almost always preferred heavier rifles in that they hold nicer. this spring I carried a 10+ .375 for 9 days on kodiak island. what is interesting is that when I started load development for it, it sure seemed heavy. But then I noticed well into the hunt that I didn't seem to notice the weight all that much. then after I took my bear, my guide-son suggested I carry his lightweight .375 as he was bow hunting. boy did that seem light! while I was carrying mine, I wasn't thinking about the weight, only the hunt. bottom line is I'd just got used to it and the weight didn't bother me at all. just my 2cents worth.
 
Posts: 313 | Registered: 08 January 2017Reply With Quote
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quote:
devere
posted 19 July 2022 02:30
mr. 06-king: I've almost always preferred heavier rifles in that they hold nicer. this spring I carried a 10+ .375 for 9 days on kodiak island. what is interesting is that when I started load development for it, it sure seemed heavy. But then I noticed well into the hunt that I didn't seem to notice the weight all that much. then after I took my bear, my guide-son suggested I carry his lightweight .375 as he was bow hunting. boy did that seem light! while I was carrying mine, I wasn't thinking about the weight, only the hunt. bottom line is I'd just got used to it and the weight didn't bother me at all. just my 2cents worth.


Mr. devere,
Thankyou for your comment. I understand and actually agree completely. On my Africa hunts I carried ( to me ) a heavy rifle. I personally carry my rifle either in hand or by Africa carry the entire time afield. I don't allow others to carry for me. And as you found I was not thinking at all about the carried weight after about day 1. You just adjust and carry on.
The difference between this and carrying my Sako .243W is that predominantly I carry this rifle for a day only per week or fortnite. I dare say if it was being carried day after day I would soon become accustomed to the weight and, in my mind, stop bellyaching about the felt weight. If my new acquisition proves to be a shooter I think it will be a win on the weight saving front.


Hunting.... it's not everything, it's the only thing.
 
Posts: 1472 | Location: New Zealand's North Island | Registered: 13 November 2014Reply With Quote
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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. That rifle looks nice to me and I am a walnut and steel type. It is well balanced in looks and will be in performance. As is, it could shoot lights out. But like all of us rifle loonies, you have to make it your own. Polish away at the bore, receiver raceway and bolt. Then go shoot. Looking forward to seeing the range results. Glad to have helped you spend your money. Regards.
 
Posts: 974 | Location: Brooksville, FL. | Registered: 01 August 2007Reply With Quote
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