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Getting rid of rust...
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During the last year of his life my dad was getting depressed, and as a result most firearms were hidden away.

My mother is hunkering down at the family farm at the moment and I asked her about this shotgun as it is special to me. I had used it on my first quail hunt with my dad when I was twelve.

So, how would I get rid of this rust.



 
Posts: 869 | Location: Southern CA | Registered: 01 January 2014Reply With Quote
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Right or wrong, I usually start with 0000 steelwool and oil.
 
Posts: 3731 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Personally I would go get a gallon container WD 40 and stand the barrels upright in it.......for days and see where it gets you. It can be a long slow process,but I have seen it done and the end result was amazing from where the project started.

PM me if you want more details.


Jon
 
Posts: 174 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 24 November 2008Reply With Quote
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Boil it for 1-2 hrs in distilled or rainwater. Then card with a fine carding wheel. Available from Brownells. 000 or 0000 steel wool will work with some elbow grease. If the rust is not removed boil/card as many times as you need to remove it. Oil with Vaseline and heat until it evaporates. Buff down and you are good to go. This will not be perfect. Likely some pitting. But will stop the rust. Otherwise you will need to sand back beyond pitting and do a re-blue. A rust blue would be appropriate.

Wood looks like it has mold and mildew. Wipe down with a solution of sodium carbonate (washing soda) and water. Mix a tablespoon in a quart of warm water. Wipe on, leave for 5 minutes and wipe off. Rinse with water and dry. Wax to protect.
 
Posts: 2602 | Location: SC,USA | Registered: 07 March 2002Reply With Quote
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Bac40, that is what I do. 4X steel wool + a good penetrating oil (like the one used for after bluing) Brownell's sells it but my label has come off over the years + I can't recall the name. BTW, WD 40 not only dispels moisture, but it also attracts it as well. I don't use it in this application for that reason.


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13539 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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NormanConquest,

Definitely, I don't ever recommend using WD 40 on guns, especially the moving parts, but I have seen it do a good job of loosening rust before using any kind of abrasive. You don"t want to leave it on very long however.
 
Posts: 174 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 24 November 2008Reply With Quote
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Tanks,

If you are going to have it re-blued make sure you take it to someone who really knows what they are doing. I know of one expensive double that the "smith" hot blued it to the point the ribs loosened on the barrels and the gun was trashed. Not a good outcome.
 
Posts: 174 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 24 November 2008Reply With Quote
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Thanks for the wealth of information.
 
Posts: 869 | Location: Southern CA | Registered: 01 January 2014Reply With Quote
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What Bobster said....
Boiling them, or actually heating them for a prolonged period with convert the red rust to black. Personally, I would contact Bobster and get a bottle of rust blue from him or use Mark Lee's Express Blue and actually do the first carding of the barrels with steel wool soaked in the bluing solution then boil again. The proceedure will not fix any pitting, nothing will outside of filing and/or sanding, but fine rust is pretty forgiving when it is carded. Repeat that process a few times and rinse in a bath of water and baking soda. Soak in oil.
 
Posts: 1262 | Location: Western NC | Registered: 08 January 2005Reply With Quote
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There is an electrolysis method using dilute vinegar or washing soda that might be of use.


TomP

Our country, right or wrong. When right, to be kept right, when wrong to be put right.

Carl Schurz (1829 - 1906)
 
Posts: 12182 | Location: Moreno Valley CA USA | Registered: 20 November 2000Reply With Quote
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I have always been impressed at what a bucket of kerosene will do. Just throw it in and let it sit for a month, hit it with a brush and back in the kerosene for another month and you will amazed.
 
Posts: 438 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 03 February 2013Reply With Quote
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I did that with the gears on an old piece of equipment I bought + it cleaned them up nicely.


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13539 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by theback40:
Right or wrong, I usually start with 0000 steelwool and oil.


+2. I've used both Hoppe's and Kroil with good results and no damage to the steel. I say start small and work your way up if you're not getting the results you want.
 
Posts: 1061 | Location: Gilbertsville, PA | Registered: 08 December 2005Reply With Quote
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Chuck that steel wool away - get some Big 45 cleaning pads and use them instead.Removes rust without affecting the blue


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Posts: 4335 | Location: Eltham , New Zealand | Registered: 13 May 2002Reply With Quote
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MUZZA WHAT ARE BIG 45 CLEANING PADS I have never heard of them.


Thank You
 
Posts: 85 | Location: northern lower michigan | Registered: 22 November 2013Reply With Quote
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http://www.big45metalcleaner.com/


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Posts: 4335 | Location: Eltham , New Zealand | Registered: 13 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Thanks for the turn on
Muzza, It's certainly cheap enough to try.


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13539 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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quote:
Thanks for the turn on

+1 tu2
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by muzza:
http://www.big45metalcleaner.com/


Thanks for the link. I will give it a try when I am allowed to fly again.
 
Posts: 869 | Location: Southern CA | Registered: 01 January 2014Reply With Quote
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I bought some. Just removed some rust from a gun with 0000 steel wool and oil, always looking for a better way. For the price you can afford to have it on hand for when needed.

Dave
 
Posts: 2031 | Location: Seattle Washington, USA | Registered: 19 January 2004Reply With Quote
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tu2 What Bobster said.

I'll go a step further and advocate his products (Rustblue.com) for re-bluing, if you head down that path. Easy to use; excellent results.


Doug Wilhelmi
NRA Life Member

 
Posts: 6588 | Location: Retired and on the road, baby! | Registered: 15 October 2013Reply With Quote
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RB 17 and brass wool works for me.
 
Posts: 353 | Location: College Station, Tx | Registered: 11 February 2005Reply With Quote
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an additional rust remover product.....

Had neighbor who gave me samples of products his company makes. One like the common 'handiwipes'.
The company named is Cortec, based in Minnesota. Their website shows MANY rust removal/resistant products including cleaners, metal surface treatments, and storage bags/wraps. etc.

I used the Cortec cleaner wipes to remove rust spots on some guns. Worked fine. took a while but the rust was gone. Some kind of film was left on the surface. did not see that it removed any of the bluing.

The website shows that a version of the product is a liquid cleaner. Might be of use for entire long guns.

Another product i tried was some of their storage bags. Look sorta like Ziploc bags. Heavier plastic. the plastic issues a corrosion resistant vapor to protect whatever is in the bag.
I used some of the Cortec storage bags [small sized ] for protecting my reloaoding dies. Cut the small bags into the right size peieces and put pieces into the die storage boxes.

seemed like a good product. the wipes did remove rust nicely.

I dont know where these products are sold or anything about the prices.
 
Posts: 51 | Location: minnesota | Registered: 16 July 2012Reply With Quote
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I use stainless steel wool pads. A friend gave me some he bought from a restaurant supply house which sells them as pot scrubbing pads. They look just like the buster45 pads pictures above. Put some oil on them and the rust just rubs off without any damage to the bluing.


Tom Z

NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 2004 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: 07 January 2005Reply With Quote
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0000 steel wool and whatever oil will get rust but thats not your problem..Your problem based on the pictures is pitting of the steel is severe, but any pitting is severe, and your gun has to be polished and reblued, end of story..

cold or rust blue on a shotgun barrel is best IMO..The old gun is worth the cost of a good rust blue I bet...


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 37013 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With Quote
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KROIL and 0000 steel wood !!!

Hip
 
Posts: 460 | Location: Long Island, New York | Registered: 04 January 2008Reply With Quote
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X2


Never mistake motion for action.
 
Posts: 13539 | Location: Austin, Texas | Registered: 11 March 2013Reply With Quote
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