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D. Nelson's Mozambique Safari
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Mozambique, August 2005

Mahimba Camp, nearest town Micaune, Zambezi Province

We departed Polokwane (formerly Pietersburg), South Africa by private charter. It took nearly 4 hours in the well laden Baron to reach Quelimane where we cleared Mozambique customs and immigration before continuing on 30 minutes to the private grass strip next to camp. The only access to Mahimba Camp is light aircraft or barge.

My husband and I had been invited to join another couple who had purchased the 10 day safari at the Reno, SCI auction. We considered taking this safari somewhat self-indulgent, since we already have another Tanzania safari booked by 2006. However, due to my husband’s macular degeneration and our addiction to Africa, we are in a race with the clock while he still has limited vision. We decided to join our friends for whatever awaited us in Mozambique.

We were unfamiliar with the outfitter so our expectations were open. The outfitter was McDonald Pro-Hunting and claimed to, historically, have a 100% success with both sable and buffalo. Our friends had previously hunted with their PH, Leon Lamprecht, in South Africa. Our PH was Dominque Maarten. The incentive for me was primarily sable, which had eluded me until now.



The camp was the tidy remnant of an old coconut plantation. Our quarters were thatched A-frames which were called chalets!???? The dining hut was a larger version as well as the kitchen hut. We had running water, albeit very red and rusty; clean but basic accommodations. We slept using mosquito netting, due to the swampy conditions of the concession and being so near the Indian Ocean. The camp itself was not of the quality we have enjoyed, for instance, in Botswana or Tanzania tent camps, but the food and staff were on equal par to anything we had previously experienced. And when comparing the barest African camp to the minimalism of an Alaskan spike camp, it was just fine.

The only real surprise we encountered was the extent of poaching we ran into while hunting. Everyday we found snares and snared animals (which we cut lose). Mozambique does not finance an anti-poaching patrol and locals apparently snare animals as a source of income from free meat. There was a great deal of waste in this method as well as a rapidly declining game population in the concession.

Our hunting plan was for me to hunt sable and to find a lone buffalo bull for my husband. We knew he wouldn’t be able to distinguish a bull within a herd for proper target ID. We had 10 days and were willing to wait until the last few days before re-assigning the buffalo to me. So we set out the first day looking for buffalo sign. We passed plentiful bushbuck, reedbuck, waterbuck, and warthog. The second day we got on a herd of 80-100 buffalo, but no lone bulls.



By the fourth day I elected to take a bushbuck that was in the wrong place at the right time for me. He proved to be a very old bull with almost translucent horns. I used, Thelma, my custom Robar.375 H&H, shooting 300 gr. Federal Trophy Bonded Bear Claw. Even though my single shot was placed right on the shoulder the bushbuck ran about 20 yards before he piled up in a palm thicket. (Gave me a nervous minute or two!)

On day 4 we stalked a herd of sable and had a great vantage point at about 70 yards and played the wind properly for over an hour, only to have the herd take off before offering me a shot at the bull.



Day 5 while glassing another herd of sable at about 300 yards, a bull sable and his single cow popped out of a palm thicket about 30 yards in front me. It was an easy shot and I finally had my sable. He wasn’t a monster like those found elsewhere in Africa, but he was a beautiful trophy to me!!! Again, I was using a 300 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw.

We spent the next two days trailing a buffalo herd. Many times we crawled as close as 30 yards; but no lone bull or a bull a part from the herd. After we put the herd to bed on the 6th night, we picked it up the next morning and trailed it until 2:00 PM. At that point our PH suggested we weren’t going to get a better scenario than an old bull in the herd at 70 yards. My husband put me out of my misery (hands full of thorns from crawling, knees black and blue, removal of ticks) and deferred the buff to me. My first shot was with a soft point, which broke the bulls shoulder well. After the herd thundered off in a cloud of dust, he stood about 50 yards away. I put a Trophy Bonded Sledgehammer solid into him. He went down and I paid the classic “insurance†with another solid. I’ve taken 5 cape buffalo prior to this one and they were all larger trophies, but together my husband and I worked for this old guy. My husband did everything with me but pull the trigger. And, I consider him a saint for allowing me to shoot HIS buffalo. I guess this is why we have been married for 37 years!!!!



In the remaining days I picked up a representative reedbuck and waterbuck. During our safari I celebrated my 59th birthday and my husband celebrated his 66th a few days later. Getting older isn’t so bad!!!!! Next year we’ll celebrate my 60th his 67th in Tanzania after elephant!



 
Posts: 5338 | Location: A Texan in the Missouri Ozarks | Registered: 02 February 2001Reply With Quote
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Eeker fantastic hunt and obviously a great hunting team.
Congrats for you and your husband. thumb

L
 
Posts: 3085 | Location: Uruguay - South America | Registered: 10 December 2001Reply With Quote
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Well done, Darin! That sable is very beautiful, his coat is a real nice pitch black color. That's a dandy bushbuck and waterbuck!

I hope I am doing as well as you at 59! You go girl! beer


~Ann



 
Posts: 15500 | Location: The LOST Nation | Registered: 27 March 2001Reply With Quote
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Congratulations and thanks for the report and pictures. Cool
 
Posts: 8736 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 24 April 2004Reply With Quote
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D.Nelson,

Congratualtions to you both on a very good hunt. You guys make a great team!

BigBullet


BigBullet

"Half the FUN of the travel is the esthetic of LOSTNESS" Ray Bradbury
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Posts: 1142 | Location: Lorraine, NY New York's little piece of frozen tundra | Registered: 05 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Well Done! Bravo to you both.
Dave


"What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value."
-Thomas Paine, "American Crisis"
 
Posts: 816 | Location: Llano, CA Mojave Desert | Registered: 30 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Posts: 9071 | Location: Texan in Colorado :( | Registered: 12 February 2004Reply With Quote
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An inspiring story and a great hunt.
Congratulations


ALLEN W. JOHNSON - DRSS

Into my heart on air that kills
From yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills,
What spires, what farms are those?
That is the land of lost content,
I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went
And cannot come again.

A. E. Housman
 
Posts: 2251 | Location: Mo, USA | Registered: 21 April 2002Reply With Quote
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You guys make a great team.
 
Posts: 8274 | Location: Mississippi | Registered: 12 April 2005Reply With Quote
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D. Nelson,

Your story makes me a bit sad (when I think about your husband's eye problems), but very happy at the same time, because I know how much fun a husband and wife can have on safari, and I can tell how much fun you two obviously do have.

My wife and I go on safari together too. She doesn't carry a rifle (as least she hasn't yet), but she has accompanied me on long and strenuous stalks of many plains game animals, and elephant and lion as well.

We wouldn't have it any other way, although riding around in a truck for days with stinking lion baits did put her off for a bit. Frowner

Congratulations on more than just the success of your safari, but that, too, of course. Smiler

My PH a couple of years ago was originally from Mozambique, and hunted several excellent coutadas there for many years. But he lost everything, and was lucky to escape with his family when the communists took the place over in the seventies and confiscated all private property.

He has Portuguese citizenship now, and still hunts in Tanzania, but he remains very bitter towards the Mozambican government and has said he will never go back. He refuses to say the name Maputo and still calls it Lourenzo Marques.

It's really a shame about the poaching. Without some government commitment to curtail it, the game will surely suffer greatly.


Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
 
Posts: 10992 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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dogcat:

When my husband had better vision and was actively hunting, he cowarded when his men friends said that he was lucky his wife hunted. He told them, no he wasn't because the hunting always costs twice as much and he always had to give me first shot!!! However, I think he is quite happy now, since I do all the booking, arranging and he hunts vicariously through me! Works for me too!!!!

Thanks for the kind comments! D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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D. Nelson: Congratulations on a great hunt and I'm sure it took on a special meaning in that you and your husband were in on the hunts together. My wife does not hunt but she went with me to Zimbabwe this yaer and LOVED it. SO much so she wants to go back and soon. Once again congrats on a great hunt. Oh and one more thing: Your age belies your photographs as you certainly don't look anywhere near 59! Congrats to your hubby. Smiler jorge


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Posts: 7112 | Location: Orange Park, Florida. USA | Registered: 22 March 2001Reply With Quote
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What a lovely story. Beautiful trophies too, especially Sable and bushbuck.

Thank you for sharing.


The price of knowledge is great but the price of ignorance is even greater.
 
Posts: 777 | Location: Socialist Republic of California | Registered: 27 February 2005Reply With Quote
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Great story and great photos.....I truly appreciate the sharing
Thanks
Vapo


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Posts: 28815 | Location: western Nebraska | Registered: 27 May 2003Reply With Quote
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D

That's a very nice bunch of critters. Your husband is a very lucky man. Always a pleasure to see your nice smile. beer beer wave


Lo do they call to me,
They bid me take my place
among them in the Halls of Valhalla,
Where the brave may live forever.
 
Posts: 2034 | Registered: 14 June 2003Reply With Quote
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Well done to you both , that is a very nice area to Hunt.
I don't want to be cheeky but one sister seems to be booked but is there a second???
What a wonderful story.
God bless you
Keith


Rhodesian in UK Armed forces.
They stole my Farm, but not my African Spirit!
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Rhodesian in Wiltshire UK | Registered: 19 September 2005Reply With Quote
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Congratulations to both you and your husband. What a wonderful experience to share.

I did this map showing the general location of the hunt. Micaune is just north of the Zambezi Delta.



Regards,

Terry

P.S.

Just out of curiosity, I Googled and found these:

Mahimba Camp Photos

McDonald Pro-Hunting



Msasi haogopi mwiba [A hunter is not afraid of thorns]
 
Posts: 5338 | Location: A Texan in the Missouri Ozarks | Registered: 02 February 2001Reply With Quote
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D. Nelson-
Your story is a great one. My wife always goes, never likes to shoot but enjoys tracking and spotting. She ducks with the guns go up, but never complains and has a lot of fun too.

My daughter just started shooting and took a zebra on our trip. She also got into shooting grouse with a .22. We had a ball and I will always take them. I hope my bride will shoot someday, but no big deal either way.

Glad you had a such a great trip.
 
Posts: 9071 | Location: Texan in Colorado :( | Registered: 12 February 2004Reply With Quote
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I have taken the liberty and added a permanent link to this hunt report.

D. Nelson's Mozambique Safari


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Posts: 53370 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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I have been fortunate to hunt Mahimba twice, both with Leon Lamprecht. In 2003 I did not shoot a buff. It was a wet year and a series of events seemed to conspire against me. This season in early August I hunted it again and on the 3rd day was able to take a nice buff. I am hopeful that Mr. Carr can get that photo to show up here;I have tried to send it to him.I was also lucky enough to take an average croc. I "ran out of string" on a couple of larger ones. Mahimba is a very interesting area. Unfortunatly as reported above the poaching is out of control. There was a shooting incident while we were there, with a poacher letting fly w/some AK rounds to thwart pursuit by camp staff who eventually tracked him to his village(~20 miles), beat him severely and turned him over to the local authorities.He was then required to work in that officals personal garden for three days and released.No wonder the game is depleted. Many of the snares we found were of stainless cable, probably from the shrimpers. Devastating!

 
Posts: 1203 | Registered: 17 February 2002Reply With Quote
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D.,
Sounds like a true Mozambican adventure with a happy ending! Great trophies and an understanding and generous husband, what a combination. Best wishes and prayers for your husband and his eyesight. Hope medical research finds something soon to reverse or slow the trend. Good luck in Tanzania!


On the plains of hesitation lie the bleached bones of ten thousand, who on the dawn of victory lay down their weary heads resting, and there resting, died.

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch...
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!
- Rudyard Kipling

Life grows grim without senseless indulgence.
 
Posts: 6969 | Location: Victoria, Texas | Registered: 30 March 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by dogcat:
WOW!!! Do you have a sister, like you?


Having known Darin for the past 25 years you can take my word on the fact that there is not another like her! (Thank God, the men would not have a chance if there were more of her) Big Grin

GP Trent
 
Posts: 63 | Registered: 27 January 2003Reply With Quote
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Crane; I did hear about your buffalo hunt from Leon and I saw the skull in the skinning hut while we were there. What a fantastic trophy! Congratulations! I bet you really saw a difference in the game populations since the time you first hunted there.

GPT; You are our bestfriend, but call me SWAMBO (She Who Always Must Be Obeyed!)

And thank you to Saeed and Terry for the posting here and the kind words from all the others. I really love this forum!

Best regards, D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Great report with great pics! I love that bushbuck of yours. Hope you both had a memoairble hunt (seems like you did)! Smiler


Anders

Hunting and fishing DVDs from Mossing & Stubberud Media: www.jaktogfiskedvd.no

..and my blog at: http://andersmossing.blogspot.com
 
Posts: 1959 | Location: Norway | Registered: 19 September 2002Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by T.Carr:
Mozambique, August 2005

Mahimba Camp, nearest town Micaune, Zambezi Province

We departed Polokwane (formerly Pietersburg), South Africa by private charter. It took nearly 4 hours in the well laden Baron to reach Quelimane where we cleared Mozambique customs and immigration before continuing on 30 minutes to the private grass strip next to camp. The only access to Mahimba Camp is light aircraft or barge.

My husband and I had been invited to join another couple who had purchased the 10 day safari at the Reno, SCI auction. We considered taking this safari somewhat self-indulgent, since we already have another Tanzania safari booked by 2006. However, due to my husband’s macular degeneration and our addiction to Africa, we are in a race with the clock while he still has limited vision. We decided to join our friends for whatever awaited us in Mozambique.

We were unfamiliar with the outfitter so our expectations were open. The outfitter was McDonald Pro-Hunting and claimed to, historically, have a 100% success with both sable and buffalo. Our friends had previously hunted with their PH, Leon Lamprecht, in South Africa. Our PH was Dominque Maarten. The incentive for me was primarily sable, which had eluded me until now.



The camp was the tidy remnant of an old coconut plantation. Our quarters were thatched A-frames which were called chalets!???? The dining hut was a larger version as well as the kitchen hut. We had running water, albeit very red and rusty; clean but basic accommodations. We slept using mosquito netting, due to the swampy conditions of the concession and being so near the Indian Ocean. The camp itself was not of the quality we have enjoyed, for instance, in Botswana or Tanzania tent camps, but the food and staff were on equal par to anything we had previously experienced. And when comparing the barest African camp to the minimalism of an Alaskan spike camp, it was just fine.

The only real surprise we encountered was the extent of poaching we ran into while hunting. Everyday we found snares and snared animals (which we cut lose). Mozambique does not finance an anti-poaching patrol and locals apparently snare animals as a source of income from free meat. There was a great deal of waste in this method as well as a rapidly declining game population in the concession.

Our hunting plan was for me to hunt sable and to find a lone buffalo bull for my husband. We knew he wouldn’t be able to distinguish a bull within a herd for proper target ID. We had 10 days and were willing to wait until the last few days before re-assigning the buffalo to me. So we set out the first day looking for buffalo sign. We passed plentiful bushbuck, reedbuck, waterbuck, and warthog. The second day we got on a herd of 80-100 buffalo, but no lone bulls.




By the fourth day I elected to take a bushbuck that was in the wrong place at the right time for me. He proved to be a very old bull with almost translucent horns. I used, Thelma, my custom Robar.375 H&H, shooting 300 gr. Federal Trophy Bonded Bear Claw. Even though my single shot was placed right on the shoulder the bushbuck ran about 20 yards before he piled up in a palm thicket. (Gave me a nervous minute or two!)

On day 4 we stalked a herd of sable and had a great vantage point at about 70 yards and played the wind properly for over an hour, only to have the herd take off before offering me a shot at the bull.



Day 5 while glassing another herd of sable at about 300 yards, a bull sable and his single cow popped out of a palm thicket about 30 yards in front me. It was an easy shot and I finally had my sable. He wasn’t a monster like those found elsewhere in Africa, but he was a beautiful trophy to me!!! Again, I was using a 300 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw.

We spent the next two days trailing a buffalo herd. Many times we crawled as close as 30 yards; but no lone bull or a bull a part from the herd. After we put the herd to bed on the 6th night, we picked it up the next morning and trailed it until 2:00 PM. At that point our PH suggested we weren’t going to get a better scenario than an old bull in the herd at 70 yards. My husband put me out of my misery (hands full of thorns from crawling, knees black and blue, removal of ticks) and deferred the buff to me. My first shot was with a soft point, which broke the bulls shoulder well. After the herd thundered off in a cloud of dust, he stood about 50 yards away. I put a Trophy Bonded Sledgehammer solid into him. He went down and I paid the classic “insurance†with another solid. I’ve taken 5 cape buffalo prior to this one and they were all larger trophies, but together my husband and I worked for this old guy. My husband did everything with me but pull the trigger. And, I consider him a saint for allowing me to shoot HIS buffalo. I guess this is why we have been married for 37 years!!!!



In the remaining days I picked up a representative reedbuck and waterbuck. During our safari I celebrated my 59th birthday and my husband celebrated his 66th a few days later. Getting older isn’t so bad!!!!! Next year we’ll celebrate my 60th his 67th in Tanzania after elephant!



 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Oops! I was trying to change pics from Photobucket to Imgur and since I didn't post my report I inadvertently replied to it! Old report!!! But I was young then!

Best regards, D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Great to read this again and what a wonderful time you had.


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Posts: 8525 | Location: Zambia | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Lovely story. Absolutely lovely. Congratulations to you both!
Regards
 
Posts: 691 | Registered: 08 December 2009Reply With Quote
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Darin,

Out of curiosity what is the barrel length of your rifle (Thelma)? The reason I ask is we are contemplating a rifle for my wife. Yours looks fairly short. If so how do you like it?


_____________________________
Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.
- Winston Churchill

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2263 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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Originally posted by Cougarz:
Darin,

Out of curiosity what is the barrel length of your rifle (Thelma)? The reason I ask is we are contemplating a rifle for my wife. Yours looks fairly short. If so how do you like it?


My .375 aka Thelma has a 20" barrel. Although I'm far from petite it was fitted to me and recoil is no problem. It is extremely maneuverable and easy to quickly get on the sticks and easier to forge through thickets than something with a longer barrel.

I would highly recommend it!

Best regards, Darin
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Thanks! Smiler


_____________________________
Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.
- Winston Churchill

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2263 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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Neat read even if it's old. I hunted Mahimba this yr. Still a great place to hunt buff seen well over 800 in 7 days.
 
Posts: 597 | Registered: 16 September 2015Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by NTO:
Neat read even if it's old. I hunted Mahimba this yr. Still a great place to hunt buff seen well over 800 in 7 days.


NTO

Did you post a hunt report? I'd like to hear how the camp is now. Does it still have red water? How is the poaching situation? Great to hear buff herds are doing well!

Best regards, D. Nelsin
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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No I didn't not much of a writer.
The poaching situation is under control with 32 yr around anti poaching on staff.
But still it is a problem still we caught 2 and burned 3 camp. Found animals in gin traps and snares.
They caught 16 poachers in the 3 weeks after I left.
Plains game was in good numbers. I shot a nice reedbuck and bushpig as well.
Seen all other species they had available.
Camp was in great shape JP Kleinhans has done well in keeping it up over the yrs and yes water still has a red tint but just adds color to your gin.
Here are some pics.


 
Posts: 597 | Registered: 16 September 2015Reply With Quote
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NTO

Great trophies! I don't know why the reedbuck is upside down. I thought when I first viewed it, it was rightside up.

Thank you for posting pics. Glad things are looking up, but the poaching is a difficult one to curb.

Best regards, D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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Congrats to you and your hubby D!

I always enjoy your honest reports.
 
Posts: 1372 | Location: Sinton, Texas | Registered: 08 November 2006Reply With Quote
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Great story and pics! Congratulations on your trophies. You go girl!

BH?63


Hunting buff is better than sex!
 
Posts: 2205 | Registered: 29 December 2015Reply With Quote
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Can't believe this report is about 12 years old! And I'm 12 years older! Seems like yesterday.

Hunt while you can! Anti's and ignorant people are trying to take this away from us!

Best regards, D. Nelson
 
Posts: 2266 | Registered: 17 July 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by D. Nelson:
Can't believe this report is about 12 years old! And I'm 12 years older! Seems like yesterday.

Hunt while you can! Anti's and ignorant people are trying to take this away from us!

Best regards, D. Nelson


Good attitude young Lady.


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Posts: 8525 | Location: Zambia | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Darin- Two of my best All Time non hunting memories are the Bush Babies in the trees in camp and what was apparently a breeding population of smallish tree frogs in the toilet tanks! Thinking about mounting a return expedition.......
 
Posts: 1203 | Registered: 17 February 2002Reply With Quote
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