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Bal, that's where I'm eventually heading...a Plains Game hunt with a BPCR. That would put the excitement back into Plains Game hunting, for sure.
 
Posts: 19091 | Location: Very NW NJ up in the Mountains | Registered: 14 June 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you do it, it will change the way you look at your hunting from here on out. Trust me.
 
Posts: 807 | Location: East Texas | Registered: 03 November 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Idaho Sharpshooter:

Ballards feature a split receiver, like motorcycle cases. I would not care to be within 100yds of a new or original in 45-70 loaded with even a light load of smokeless...


Are you meaning a split breach block or a split action?

Some of the early ones did have cast receivers . Though the cast ones originally came chambered for cartridges as large as the .44-40, I wouldn't shoot one of those in anything more potent than .22RF, as old as they are now.

The Pacific Ballards though, all had forged receivers and a split breech block. After-market solid breech blocks were available for many years, though it appears there was no great rush to buy them. Seems the original split breech block rifles, factory chambered even in .45-100, worked just fine.

BTW, Marlin made 23 distinctly different models in the years they produced the Ballard. So one has to be specific about which model he is ascribing "characteristics" to.

I shot my Pacific Ballard a lot in the 2 years+ that I owned it. My loads were ALL light loads of 3031 behind the Lyman 457125 bullet which from my mould weighed just at 500 grains.

Never gave me any hint of trouble.

Doesn't really matter one way or the other though. This forum is about BLACK POWDER cartridge rifles if I read its title correctly.


My country gal's just a moonshiner's daughter, but I love her still.

 
Posts: 9685 | Location: Cave Creek 85331, USA | Registered: 17 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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perhaps, but there is a reason or two Marlin is not offering them anymore.

Black Powder Cartridge Rifles, yes, but exclusively with Black.
 
Posts: 23062 | Location: SW Idaho | Registered: 19 December 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Biebs:
Bal, that's where I'm eventually heading...a Plains Game hunt with a BPCR. That would put the excitement back into Plains Game hunting, for sure.


Jon,
before I got into DR's etc,all I knew was the Sharps rifles,pg with one is going to be fun at any ranges Wink,these rifles are deadly accurate,I have dropped a bison & an elk with one of my Shiloh's,there was a cloud of dust in the air when the bison dropped,the guide's jaw dropped to the floor lol,unfortunately I have never shot BP outta my rifles,it's been all smokeless,so I am damned to hell & back Big Grin


DRSS
 
Posts: 2144 | Location: MI | Registered: 20 March 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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unfortunately I have never shot BP outta my rifles,it's been all smokeless,so I am damned to hell & back Big Grin

Sinner, blasphemer! Repent!
 
Posts: 19091 | Location: Very NW NJ up in the Mountains | Registered: 14 June 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great read, I started the madness on the cheap with a browning b-78 in 40-65 Ron Long and still shoot it in competition. LB
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: 20 May 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Idaho Sharpshooter:
perhaps, but there is a reason or two Marlin is not offering them anymore.

Black Powder Cartridge Rifles, yes, but exclusively with Black.



Yes, the same reason Sharps wasn't offered for many years....in fact the Sharps disappeared first.

One of the biggest groups of Ballard buyers was westerners...particularly buffalo hunters. When the buffalo went away the Ballards still sold well to folks who wanted a combo large bore for big game and a quick operating single shot for things like grizzly encounters.

That need went away when the Winchester M'86 appeared, and a couple of years later, so had most sales of large bore Ballards. Then as now most hunters were not wealthy and most could find advantages in repeating rifles over single-shots.

Then for a long while, Ballards in medium bores dominated Schuetzen shooting with mainly .38-55 and .32-40 Ballards being the choice of champions, with both black and smokeless loadings..

But then came the bolt action and the beginning of the diminuation of "stand on yer hind legs and shoot like a man" competition. So, by the '30s demand had dropped off for the Ballard in everything except small bore competition, where it was (& still is) superb.

Why don't you see many on the line?

Look at prices and you'll know. Despite my tongue-in-cheek humour when I noted my Pacific Ballard would likely have gone up in price a bit, in fact they are likely the most expensive single-shot rifles in America. Just about the worst condition ones now bring about $3,000, and it is not unusual for one to sell at $30,000. And it has always been that way...expensive, but sought after by knowing riflemen with the money to own one.


My country gal's just a moonshiner's daughter, but I love her still.

 
Posts: 9685 | Location: Cave Creek 85331, USA | Registered: 17 August 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Looks to me like the Lyman "Model of 1878" Sharps clone of the 1877 Sharps in the "Lyman Classic Series" is made only in 45-70 Govt. by Pedersoli,
for about 2 grand.

The smaller caliber "Ideal Model" Sharps clone in the "Lyman Classic Series" costs $300 less and is in 38-55 Win. and 22 Hornet chamberings, from Chiappa.

Right?
 
Posts: 28032 | Location: KY | Registered: 09 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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RIP, I've seen dealers with the 45-70s in the $1,450 range.
 
Posts: 19091 | Location: Very NW NJ up in the Mountains | Registered: 14 June 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Biebs:
RIP, I've seen dealers with the 45-70s in the $1,450 range.


Ah so, demand has not matched supply for initial MSRP. tu2
 
Posts: 28032 | Location: KY | Registered: 09 December 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Imagine that..
 
Posts: 807 | Location: East Texas | Registered: 03 November 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How about a nice English or Scottish double in .450 or .500? In the states they are big 'uns but across the pond they are deer rifles with their lighter express bullets. Prices are good, too.
Cal


_______________________________

Cal Pappas, Willow, Alaska
www.CalPappas.com
www.CalPappas.blogspot.com
1994 Zimbabwe
1997 Zimbabwe
1998 Zimbabwe
1999 Zimbabwe
1999 Namibia, Botswana, Zambia--vacation
2000 Australia
2002 South Africa
2003 South Africa
2003 Zimbabwe
2005 South Africa
2005 Zimbabwe
2006 Tanzania
2006 Zimbabwe--vacation
2007 Zimbabwe--vacation
2008 Zimbabwe
2012 Australia
2013 South Africa
2013 Zimbabwe
2013 Australia
2016 Zimbabwe
2017 Zimbabwe
2018 South Africa
2018 Zimbabwe--vacation
2019 South Africa
2019 Botswana
2019 Zimbabwe vacation
2021 South Africa
2021 South Africa (2nd hunt a month later)
______________________________
 
Posts: 7155 | Location: Willow, Alaska | Registered: 29 June 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, I've always had an interest in the BP doubles. A 577 can be as useful today as it was back then, with a 650gr bullets at about 1,700-1,800 fps.
 
Posts: 19091 | Location: Very NW NJ up in the Mountains | Registered: 14 June 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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