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Cracked handle repair
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Picture of JBrown
posted
I know that this is a silly question, but I figured that you guys would have a few good ideas...

I have a Rapala fillet knife with the birch handle. After using and hand-washing it last week I noticed that it the handle had developed a crack. The crack is a couple of inches long and is runs with the grain of the handle. It reminds me of a drying crack in a log. It does not extend all the way to the hilt or the tang.

I am wondering what the best course of action would be. I am thinking that I might get by with filling the crack with epoxy and sanding it smooth. Is there a better way?

If worse comes to worse I an always shell out another $15 for a new knife.


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 6095 | Location: Nome, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Picture of Mike_Dettorre
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I ain't a knife guy but I read a lot and always heard the stock guys talking about using a thin epoxy and blowing it into the crack then clamping it.


Mike



What I have learned on AR, since 2001:
1. The proper answer to: Where is the best place in town to get a steak dinner? is…You should go to Mel's Diner and get the fried chicken.
2. Big game animals can tell the difference between .015 of an inch in diameter, 15 grains of bullet weight, and 150 fps.
3. There is a difference in the performance of two identical projectiles launched at the same velocity if they came from different cartridges.
4. While a double rifle is the perfect DGR, every 375HH bolt gun needs to be modified to carry at least 5 down.
5. While a floor plate and detachable box magazine both use a mechanical latch, only the floor plate latch is reliable. Disregard the fact that every modern military rifle uses a detachable box magazine.
6. The Remington 700 is unreliable regardless of the fact it is the basis of the USMC M40 sniper rifle for 40+ years with no changes to the receiver or extractor and is the choice of more military and law enforcement sniper units than any other rifle.
7. PF actions are not suitable for a DGR and it is irrelevant that the M1, M14, M16, & AK47 which were designed for hunting men that can shoot back are all PF actions.
8. 95 deg F in Africa is different than 95 deg F in TX or CA and that is why you must worry about ammunition temperature in Africa (even though most safaris take place in winter) but not in TX or in CA.
9. The size of a ding in a gun's finish doesn't matter, what matters is whether it’s a safe ding or not.
10. 1 in a row is a trend, 2 in a row is statistically significant, and 3 in a row is an irrefutable fact.
11. Never buy a WSM or RCM cartridge for a safari rifle or your go to rifle in the USA because if they lose your ammo you can't find replacement ammo but don't worry 280 Rem, 338-06, 35 Whelen, and all Weatherby cartridges abound in Africa and back country stores.
12. A well hit animal can run 75 yds. in the open and suddenly drop with no initial blood trail, but the one I shot from 100 yds. away that ran 10 yds. and disappeared into a thicket and was not found was lost because the bullet penciled thru. I am 100% certain of this even though I have no physical evidence.
13. A 300 Win Mag is a 500 yard elk cartridge but a 308 Win is not a 300 yard elk cartridge even though the same bullet is travelling at the same velocity at those respective distances.
 
Posts: 9735 | Location: Loving retirement in Boise, ID | Registered: 16 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Picture of Mark
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If you don't mind spending a little time on it, I'd sand the old finish off with 220-320 grit sand paper then give the handle a coating of superglue.Use a decent superglue of the "thin and hot" variety that you purchase at a model store/hobby shop. Coat the handle all over, and then rub it in with your hand stuck in a baggie so you don't get glued yourself. Let it dry and if the crack is still there put a little bit of sawdust or other filler with some more super glue, don't go overboard as its easy to do but can be a pita to sand down even afterwards. When done lightly sand then spray with a clear finish and you're done and you now have a sealed handle that won't crack any more even if left in water for a while.

Also, since this crack was caused by dimensional change in the wood I don't think you'll have much luck clamping it. If you want to try I'd do the superglue thing then put the handle in a baggie and wrap it quite tightly with a decent amount of electrical tape. My best luck in closing cracks in handles is soaking for a while in linseed oil until the wood swells slightly and when the oil has set go over it with a poly coat but still no guarantees it won't come back.


for every hour in front of the computer you should have 3 hours outside
 
Posts: 7690 | Location: Between 2 rivers, Middle USA | Registered: 19 August 2000Reply With Quote
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Picture of JBrown
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I should have mentioned that the crack is from a dimensional change. The other thing that is odd is that the handle does not seem to have a finish of any kind. It is bare wood.


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 6095 | Location: Nome, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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If the knife can be replaced for $15.00, I wouldn't put much time or work in the repair.

Dave
 
Posts: 2086 | Location: Seattle Washington, USA | Registered: 19 January 2004Reply With Quote
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Picture of JBrown
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Dave, that was kinda my point in the original post. I was just wondering if there was a better course of action than just slapping some epoxy into the crack and sanding/filing it smooth.

quote:
Originally posted by JBrown:
I am thinking that I might get by with filling the crack with epoxy and sanding it smooth. Is there a better way?

If worse comes to worse I an always shell out another $15 for a new knife.


I think I will blow epoxy into the bottom of the crack as Mike suggested then fill the crack level with the handle. I will then seal the handle as Mark described.

Thanks for the suggestions!


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 6095 | Location: Nome, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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That would work.


Keep the Pointy end away from you
www.jerryfisk.com
 
Posts: 472 | Registered: 28 August 2014Reply With Quote
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I find things like that a good way to experiment and learn!
 
Posts: 5403 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Picture of TCLouis
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Send it to me then go out and buy yourself a new one.

Works for me and solves your problem.

Roll Eyes
 
Posts: 4141 | Location: TN USA | Registered: 17 March 2002Reply With Quote
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TC, that's funny. Sometimes the simple answer is the best.


Keep the Pointy end away from you
www.jerryfisk.com
 
Posts: 472 | Registered: 28 August 2014Reply With Quote
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Picture of Use Enough Gun
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I've got a whole drawer full of Rapala fillet knives, leather sheaths and all. tu2 I think that I bought most of them new for well under $10 at the time. All are still sharp and work. wave I even inherited my dad's and father in law's as well. rotflmo
 
Posts: 17535 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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