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Knife Sharpener????
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Picture of ramrod340
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Ok I admit it I suck at using a stone to sharpen my knifes.

So thought I would put something on my Santa list. What kind of sharpener would you suggest. I have a Spyder??? now. Works OK But as Tim on tool time would say more power. Big Grin


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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I have used lots so sharpeners. Nothing in my view works like the Sypderco Sharpmaker. It will get virtually any blade shaving sharp with minimal effort.


Mike
 
Posts: 19473 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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I like DMT diamond hones used in conjunction with their aligner guide.

Lee
 
Posts: 569 | Location: Vancouver, WA | Registered: 28 June 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Sypderco Sharpmaker

That is what I'm using. I probably don't use it often enough. Seems like I end using the dark stones too much


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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An 8 inch fine India stone and a handful of yard sale knives. Practice on the junk till you can freehand it.
You'll be glad you did!
 
Posts: 350 | Location: oklahoma | Registered: 01 August 2006Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by ramrod340:
quote:
Sypderco Sharpmaker

That is what I'm using. I probably don't use it often enough. Seems like I end using the dark stones too much


I cannot argue with the knife makers . . .

What I do with mine is if the blade is really dull, I will give it five or six pulls through a Redi Edge sharpener to get it to a point where it is at least a good starting point for the Sypderco. Then I use the flat side of the Sypderco gray stone about 20-30 passes left and right, the pointed side of the gray stone about 20-30 passes, switch to the white stone and about 20-30 passes each side on the flat and pointed sides respectively. I never ceased to be amazed at how sharp that will get a blade.


Mike
 
Posts: 19473 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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I use all of the above, but for general sharpening of knives that simply have gotten dull thru normal use, I use the sharpmaker. My secondary is India stones. I have DMT diamond stones but dont't seem to use them very much.

The secret to keeping a blade sharp, assuming it has good steel, is to touch it up before it gets really dull.

The worst fault of the sharpmaker is that if you have a thick blade or the profile is really off, it takes FOREVER to get the profile to where you can sharpen it on the sharpmaker, thus the India Stones.


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Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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You can also get diamond grit rods for the Spyderco as well as extra-fine. I use all four sets (the ones that came with it plus diamond and extra-fine) when called for. The diamond are more aggressive when needed and the extra-fine to finish off.

My favorite touch-up tool is an old DMT diamond rod that they no longer make. I ordered some new ones from them to touch up serrated portions of blades that I use for cutting zip ties and the like.
 
Posts: 8773 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 24 April 2004Reply With Quote
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First get good quality knives to work with. Then take pride in keeping them sharp.

Mike and i ran the world cutting contest for years. A knife sharpened on a flat fine India stone always won the event. For your best edges on a quality knife go
With a tradional flat fine india. Re-discover what your grandparents knew.

Or, come to the little rock knife show in Feb. We are putting on a cutting contest there at the show. We will be asking the boys their materials and how they sharpened it.


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Posts: 449 | Registered: 28 August 2014Reply With Quote
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quote:
sharpmaker



http://www.worksharptools.com/...-tool-sharpener.html

fast--- repeatable-- effective-- 3 levels of sharp-- low labor input--- works on any knife even an ax -- no guessing you can shave with the wife's butter knife if you dare put an edge on it


Anyway it matters not, because my experience always has been that of---- a loss of snot and enamel on both sides of the 458 Win----
 
Posts: 1016 | Location: SLC Utah  | Registered: 13 February 2009Reply With Quote
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I can take a sharp knife and a stone and turn it into an anvil in minutes. I bought the worksharp Ken Onion edition and could not be more pleased !


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Posts: 2186 | Location: Houston, TX. | Registered: 18 May 2004Reply With Quote
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quote:
I can take a sharp knife and a stone and turn it into an anvil in minutes

tu2 I know your pain.


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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Jerry and Mike,

India stones???

Next you guys are going to be telling us that people still make knives by heating a piece of steel and beating on it with a hammer. Smiler

Hope both of you had a great Thanksgiving.

Lee
 
Posts: 569 | Location: Vancouver, WA | Registered: 28 June 2010Reply With Quote
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I was always impressed with my grandpa that could get a shaving edge from an Arkansas stone. With me just not happening. Roll Eyes Just like watching the guy you can cut a better checker job than I can and do it in hours not weeks.

I can take a blade and get ALMOST there then oops 5 steps back. I had seen the Onion sharpener Glad to hear people are happy with it.


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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I've been using a Japanese stone that has a coarse grit on one side and a very fine on the other. I'm not exactly sure what material it is (can't read Japanese), but it seems like some sort of clayey stone. I load it up with water ( it holds a lot!) and go to town. I follow this up with a steel and my knives are crazy sharp.
 
Posts: 7396 | Registered: 31 January 2005Reply With Quote
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The operator based thing that affects knife sharpening results the most is ................consistent sharpening angle ...........stroke by stroke.

Choice of stone & grit size determine the smoothness of the edge & its longevity.

generally finer grit generates greater smoothness & edge longevity.

a super smooth sharp edge is wonderful to slice with , but not always the best edge for every job.
eg cutting thru mixed flesh & rib bones on a fish is best accomplished with edge longevity by only sharpening to around #400.

For people who only have need to sharpen knives occasionally a sharpening system that controls edge angle gives more reliable results than freehand on the best of stones.
eg Lansky crock sticks etc at the bottom end of the pricerange & 'Wicked Edge' or 'Scary Sharp' systems up towards the top, with single edge systems in the middle.

personally I prefer the double sided systems like 'wicked edge' best & find they produce extremely reliable high quality results for both experienced & newbie "sharpeners.

I have been using an oversize DIY system in what has become the wicked edge style for many years fitted with a range of Arkansas stones custom made for me ( not the easiest thing to organise from downunda in Oz ).
The 4" stones in the commercial wicked edge system are very good for the vast majority of users on knives up to 8"blade max, but are best up to about 6" blades.
FWIW

PS
Getting a super sharp square edge on a chisel has the same problems for DIY.........& why those simple little chisel sharpening cradles with their tiny wheels, that control edge angle produce such excellent results reliably.
 
Posts: 493 | Registered: 01 September 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Baumgart:
Jerry and Mike,

India stones???

Next you guys are going to be telling us that people still make knives by heating a piece of steel and beating on it with a hammer. Smiler

BACKWARDS???? Surely you jest. Give us a big rock to beat on, a pine knot fire, and a piece of old chevy spring and we are good to go.

Hope both of you had a great Thanksgiving.

Lee
 
Posts: 350 | Location: oklahoma | Registered: 01 August 2006Reply With Quote
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I have been told by meat cutters that oftentimes your knife isn't really dull, but rather that it has "rolled" to the left or right and just needs to be straightened out.
I don't know if that is actually a fact or not, but I do know that I very rarely "sharpen" my knives. Rather, I use a steel on them often, and they seem to keep cutting just fine. (made of 154CM steel)
 
Posts: 2059 | Location: Mpls., MN | Registered: 28 June 2014Reply With Quote
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Picture of ramrod340
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quote:
"rolled"

Kind of like the way you roll a scraper edge? Just a guess.

I worse with a steel than a stone. Roll Eyes


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by lee440:
I can take a sharp knife and a stone and turn it into an anvil in minutes. I bought the worksharp Ken Onion edition and could not be more pleased !


I had a Lansky for a long time. The Diamond stones get dull fast and my knives just were not sharp. I got a Ken Onion and WOW. My knives are scary sharp and I love it.
 
Posts: 985 | Location: Southern Idaho | Registered: 24 March 2002Reply With Quote
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Picture of Lee Baumgart
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Here's a link to a sharpening video with Daniel Crotts of Dozier Knives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NS5S0YLYA74

Lee
 
Posts: 569 | Location: Vancouver, WA | Registered: 28 June 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by lindy2:
I have been told by meat cutters that oftentimes your knife isn't really dull, but rather that it has "rolled" to the left or right and just needs to be straightened out.
I don't know if that is actually a fact or not,


This rolling of the edge is true ...........it comes mostly from contact with large bones, not intended for severing, while slicing. can also be caused by hard impact with hard cutting boards.
Smileralso caused by bundling a naked blade with other utensils during washingup or placing in a dishwasher to rattle around from the water jet(s).

edge angle & edge hardness largely determines how resistant a blade is to suffering edge rolling.
blades used where the duty is likely to include significant contact with large bones etc ( eg breaking , boning, chopping knives)are typically sharpened to a larger edge angle ( say 20 Deg) than knives used exclusively for slicing ( say 15 deg)(eg sashimi , carving etc )
 
Posts: 493 | Registered: 01 September 2010Reply With Quote
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I used a Spyderco sharpmaker as my go to sharpener for many years. Last year I started using a Warthog sharpener and haven't looked back. Very easy to use and produces a shaving edge quickly and easily. FWIW.
 
Posts: 30 | Location: Angola, Africa | Registered: 05 October 2010Reply With Quote
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Hands down - WICKED EDGE
 
Posts: 246 | Registered: 23 March 2012Reply With Quote
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In my 65 years I've never been much good with bench stones and for awhile I've been using the wheels that you mount on a bench grinder (like the ones you see fellas use at the gun shows) with okay results.

Based on all the positive things I've read yesterday I ordered a Ken Onion Work Sharp plus a box of four extra fine belts and a box of five extra medium belts from Amazon for $164.31 shipped.

From what I've read, like everything else, there is a learning curve to using the WS so I'll practice on older kitchen knives first.


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Posts: 222 | Location: Central Oklahoma | Registered: 15 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Hands down - WICKED EDGE

Eeker That one made my eyes water.

Thanks to all who have comments. I put the Onion with extra belts on the Santa list. Will see how it goes.


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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I have a butt load of sharpeners, but my original South African Warthog Sharpener and the Work Sharp do everything that I need done. When in the field, I carry the small ceramic stick sharpeners to put an edge back on and keep my knives sharp. My Diamond Blade knives, however, will always go back to the company for sharpening when the need for the same comes. Big Grin
 
Posts: 17395 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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tried them all over the years. much prefer the Work Sharp for results and ease of use. i use ceramic sticks out in the bush.
 
Posts: 11016 | Location: Georgia | Registered: 28 October 2006Reply With Quote
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This discussion has had me very interested, as I am in the same boat as some of you (lack of sharpening skills), and have been looking for a good quality sharpener that I can not screw up with! I ordered the Warthog V Sharp yesterday, I must say I am pretty excited, hell ive got a pile of knives on the counter, waiting!
 
Posts: 98 | Location: N.MI to NE,IN | Registered: 02 February 2012Reply With Quote
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It's a sickness I tell you, I do not know how many darn stones and gizmos I have but it is a lot. LOL I just discovered 3 in one of my dresser drawers the other day.

Anyway, can anyone tell me if the worksharp Ken Onion version is worth $160 VS the regular worksharp that is $80? It looks like one has a variable speed and an adjustable tool rest but I don't see much difference other than that.

Regarding the belt speed I have a router speed control that should work but I am hoping that my kids will be able to use this to sharpen kitchen knives (we have a lot of those) primarily. I don't like the pull through sharpeners that much and I do get tired of getting called to sharpen knives every time we have a roast.

Anyway, if someone could provide a recommendation between the 2 I'd appreciate it.

Thanks!

Mark


for every hour in front of the computer you should have 3 hours outside
 
Posts: 7680 | Location: Between 2 rivers, Middle USA | Registered: 19 August 2000Reply With Quote
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The Ken Onion is $129.95 shipped on Amazon right now and the older version is $79.89 shipped......the KO has actually gone up $10.00 since I ordered mine on Monday.


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Posts: 222 | Location: Central Oklahoma | Registered: 15 December 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Anyway, can anyone tell me if the worksharp Ken Onion version is worth $160 VS the regular worksharp that is $80? It looks like one has a variable speed and an adjustable tool rest but I don't see much difference other than that.

Mark when I was looking I found a link on you tube where a guy was comparing the 2.

New one has more power and adjustment. Wider and better belts. The old had a better support for the blade (in his opinion)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shx_H58jX3w


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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There is sharpening, and then there is honing. Sharpening is cutting the edge to the proper angle and profile. Honing is the final touch. Here's a method I learned from Fine Woodworking: Place a piece of wet-or-dry paper on a piece of glass or other hard, flat surface. Add a bit of honing oil and begin stroking. (The blade, dummy.) Change grits as desired. I usually top out at 400 or 600.

I make my own honing oil, just motor oil with a little kerosene or lamp oil to thin it out. That's about 1/100th the cost of so-called honing oil.
 
Posts: 2827 | Location: Seattle, in the other Washington | Registered: 26 April 2006Reply With Quote
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Just an update but I ordered the original model from Bass Pro and later got a message saying they are backordered at the moment. I'll post up my experiences with it when it does arrive.

The sharpener is on sale for $70 with free shipping at the moment:

http://www.basspro.com/Work-Sh...er/product/10215197/

Hopefully soon as I have a whole drawer of kitchen knives I'd like to sharpen before Christmas dinner Smiler


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Posts: 7680 | Location: Between 2 rivers, Middle USA | Registered: 19 August 2000Reply With Quote
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The local Tyson chicken plant uses Warthog sharpeners


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Posts: 7305 | Location: South East Missouri | Registered: 23 November 2005Reply With Quote
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tu2
 
Posts: 17395 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by ramrod340:
I was always impressed with my grandpa that could get a shaving edge from an Arkansas stone.

I've never had trouble getting a good sharp blade from an Arkansas stone. I strop the fine edge of an old leather belt, and they come out sharp for me.

I've also got the Lansky set, but can't get as sharp with it as I can with my Arkansas stones.
 
Posts: 68 | Location: Fouke, Ark. | Registered: 06 August 2014Reply With Quote
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I've never had trouble getting a good sharp blade from an Arkansas stone. I strop the fine edge of an old leather belt, and they come out sharp for me.

I would if I could. Frowner


As usual just my $.02
Paul K
 
Posts: 12831 | Location: Mexico, MO | Registered: 02 April 2001Reply With Quote
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I've got 2000 and 6000 grit big ass stones for my Jap ss laser kitchen knives. I know I'm (inadvertently) putting convex edges on them as I ain't that good. I may try cannibalizing the "rigging/angle holders" from some of the gadgets I have lying around to help with that.

My wife bought be a Ken Onion thingamajig for Xmas for use on everything else. Looks better than the original (which I've used for a few years).


 
Posts: 1365 | Location: El Campo Texas | Registered: 26 July 2004Reply With Quote
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Belt sander with a 2X72 600 grit belt, 3 passes at 15 degrees on both sides then move to buffer with a sisal wheel loaded with white rouge, scapel sharp in less than 5 minutes..
 
Posts: 117 | Location: Texas Hill Country | Registered: 19 April 2014Reply With Quote
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