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Jim Shockey Knife?
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Anyone have thoughts on the new, just available Jim Shockey Signature Edition Havalon Titan? Saw it on his show and really like the other Havalon knives. Looks like a good idea ridged blade coupled with their quick change blades.

Thanks.

Larry Sellers
SCI(International)Life Member
R8 Blaser
 
Posts: 3447 | Location: Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Registered: 09 February 2006Reply With Quote
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I have the Piranta and the Barracuta.



I mainly use them for starters. They are like scalpels and if one is not careful you can do damage to a cape as well as ones self.

I'm not much on folders for skinning, much less a two bladed folder.

I use custom knives that typically bear the makers' mark, but am also not much on products that are branded by the endorser.

However my opinion and $2 will get you a cup of Joe at Wafflehouse.

Best,


GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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Havalon blades are superb. Other knives are forshow only.
 
Posts: 8264 | Location: Houston, Texas | Registered: 26 December 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by lavaca:
Havalon blades are superb. Other knives are forshow only.



Ain't dat da' truth'..........












































JAPPFT,


GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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Lavaca, so what you are saying is that any gun other than a Mossberg 12 gauge pump is just for show?

Larry, I am with GW on the two bladed folder. It makes not difference what the handle looks like, you gotta grab and hold the top of the other blade while using the open blade on them twice bladed folders.

To me if you want a Havalon get it. Use it at camp. When you go into the brush you never know what your needs might be. Carry a quality fixed blade and you have it covered. Learn to sharpen one.


Keep the Pointy end away from you
www.jerryfisk.com
 
Posts: 419 | Registered: 28 August 2014Reply With Quote
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I like what Guitar Shorty has to say...........






ya' gotta have the right tool for the job.



not to be negative, but here is a Boker Top lock Auto I carried daily for over 10 years........




prolly opened over 3,000 bottles of Negra Modelo with this blade alone.....


Try doing that with a Havilon Piranta or Barracuta blade......


JAPPFT,


GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by just-a-hunter:
I will guarantee I can get any one of those knives GW posted as sharp as a havalon.


Todd speaks the truth! I have one of his knives and if you run it down your arm the hair simply jumps off.


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 5927 | Location: Nome, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Suuposedly the late Maurice Ottmar coined the bromide "life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun"

I bastardize that to a degree to suggest that
"life is too short to employ an ugly knife".

































JAPPFT,


GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by lavaca:
Havalon blades are superb. Other knives are forshow only.

L. is right; it is all for show. I can skin a deer with a broke pop bottle; but that ain't the point is it?
A knife that really cuts AND looks really nice is how we stay in business.
H&R to H&H we all have our spot!
 
Posts: 350 | Location: oklahoma | Registered: 01 August 2006Reply With Quote
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Hi Larry: I have two large Pelican cases that are literally butt-full of knives from custom knife makers and very expensive, right on down to well known quality, but reasonably priced knives. I have Jim's new Titan knife and I love it! Big Grin When the large blade is open and locked in place, you manually slide a locking button in place to keep the smaller blade from accidentally opening. tu2 The sharpest knives ever are the Diamond Blade knives, with their special sheath liners. If you even look at them wrong, they will cut you! Big Grin
 
Posts: 16925 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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As an owner of many customs and quality factory knives, I look at them like a good retriever or girlfriend. FUNCTION over form. They have to work first. IF they can function AND look good, that's even better. I cannot do the replaceable blade thing. I'm too partial to good steel I have sharpened. Hell, I spent years learning how and pride myself on my ability.
 
Posts: 1991 | Location: Sinton, TX | Registered: 16 June 2013Reply With Quote
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Buy the knife Larry. You'll enjoy it! tu2
 
Posts: 16925 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Most of my hunting/skinning is done from a camp. Very seldom do I pack in. Consequently I'm not concerened about packing light.

This basic kit covers just about any requirement I might have for taking a critter apart.



Add a few customs and its more of a pleasure than a task.

JAPPFT,

GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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A reciprocating saw sure does make quartering a hog for the ice chest an easy task. Smiler


_____________________
A successful man is one who earns more money than his wife can spend.
 
Posts: 3233 | Location: Southern NM USA | Registered: 01 October 2002Reply With Quote
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Thanks - bought one and am carrying it in my EDC bag at the moment. Will be an item in my hunting day pack for sure. See you in LV if the knee keeps coming along?


quote:
Originally posted by Use Enough Gun:
Buy the knife Larry. You'll enjoy it! tu2
 
Posts: 3447 | Location: Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Registered: 09 February 2006Reply With Quote
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Looking forward to it! tu2
 
Posts: 16925 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Guys that rely on knives for a living- ie guides seem to like the Havalons. I have definitely noticed that over the past 2 years, nearly every guide I've used has had them, and for good reason. They never dull- they're just a finger nail away from another razor sharp blade. I watched one skin a big brown bear and his comment to the other guide was I only used one blade- you need to get these. In the field there is nothing better.

But I will never be a guide and will always be a client so I'll never need a Havalon or an external frame pack. For skinning deer I'm having Lee B. build me a knife set as I type. For the dirty nasty hogs those I don't just drag off I won't ruin any nice blade- they get my Gerbers.


 
Posts: 1346 | Location: El Campo Texas | Registered: 26 July 2004Reply With Quote
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FMC's comments echo my own somewhat limited experience helping with bear hunts in coastal Alaska. When you spend the number of days in the field that guides do, the things you carry tend to be viewed in a different way. Prior to being in Alaska, I had always been fastidious about caring for my guns; I coddled them. I returned to the lower 48 at the end of the season with a 416 Remington that looked like it had been in a war. it had been bathed in salt water several times, repeatedly banged against my pack frame, and (not to start the debate again) used as a "walking stick" a time or two. This is also why Mr. Shoemaker put together his 458 the way he did.

I also remember getting back to the hotel in Fairbanks, after spending a month in the Alaska range, and sleeping on the floor because the bed was too soft! I like soft beds now.

Lee
 
Posts: 567 | Location: Vancouver, WA | Registered: 28 June 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Baumgart:

I also remember getting back to the hotel in Fairbanks, after spending a month in the Alaska range, and sleeping on the floor because the bed was too soft! I like soft beds now.

Lee



Harken back to my surfing days in the late 60's thru mid 70's.

We would take a pair of "bags, Huaraches, a couple shirts, a sleeping bag and a surf board. We'd pay a dollar a nite to stay in a "trailer park" ( usually a palm grove on the beach) We'd stretch a rope between two trees. Use one sleeping bag for the floor and the other stretched over the rope and tied down at the four corners. There would usually be a cold water shower nozzle where one could shower off. After a month or two of that and you came back to civilization, it took a good while to get used to taking hot water showers. LOL



Still have my "Caster" from my '76 trip to Puerto Escondido, Mexico.

Best,


GWB
 
Posts: 23547 | Location: Pearland, Tx,, USA | Registered: 10 September 2001Reply With Quote
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