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Any thoughts on Buck Kalinga
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Picture of Beretta682E
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https://www.buckknives.com/pro...nga-knife/0401RWS-B/

Academy has it on clearance for $50

Thanks

Mike


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.

Bernard Baruch
 
Posts: 12919 | Location: Cocoa Beach, Florida | Registered: 22 July 2010Reply With Quote
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Yeah, I wish I had an Academy like yours near me. They have a bunch of good deals. That said, the knife is pretty crappy IMO but for $50 it is not a bad deal. 420HC steel is pretty crappy stuff. Decent design, not good metal IMO.


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When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

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Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Gatogordo:
Yeah, I wish I had an Academy like yours near me. They have a bunch of good deals. That said, the knife is pretty crappy IMO but for $50 it is not a bad deal. 420HC steel is pretty crappy stuff. Decent design, not good metal IMO.


I might buy it for $50 to use as a table decoration. It looks neat but not very practical.

Academy was selling a tikka 270 for 429 - that was a steal but I shoot left handed. Also another academy was selling Barnes tsx 270 for $20 a box.

Mike


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.

Bernard Baruch
 
Posts: 12919 | Location: Cocoa Beach, Florida | Registered: 22 July 2010Reply With Quote
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Hey, on second thought, I'd buy one for $50. They'd make a great gift to those who don't know better.

AFA the design goes, I think it is a good one. I think it is much easier to skin with an uplifted point, such as the Kalinga, than the oft praised, drop point, which, I don't think serves any useful purpose unless you place your finger on top of blade to guide the incision. Think about it, the hardest part of skinning, and I not talking about caping a trophy, is opening the gut up without cutting the intestines (which I certainly am guilty of, especially when in a rush). IMO it is a helluva lot easier to use a knife with an upswept point than one with a drop point, easier to see where the cutting edge is.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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Damn that thing is UGLY !

Poor steel.
Not my idea of
a good design .
 
Posts: 1991 | Location: Sinton, TX | Registered: 16 June 2013Reply With Quote
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That model has been around since the mid 70's at least. Have to confess I thought they were kinda cool back in my pre-teen days when I watched a lot of African Adventure movies on Saturday mornings!


for every hour in front of the computer you should have 3 hours outside
 
Posts: 7677 | Location: Between 2 rivers, Middle USA | Registered: 19 August 2000Reply With Quote
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When I was a kid I wanted one too. Never bought one though.

Not sure I agree with not liking the steel in it. It takes a good edge and is easy to touch up in the field which is a lot more than can be said with many of the new wonder steels.

At $50 I don't see how you could go wrong if it's what you like.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Not sure I agree with not liking the steel in it. It takes a good edge and is easy to touch up in the field which is a lot more than can be said with many of the new wonder steels.


Ah, but the new wonder steels, and not all of them are hard to sharpen, won't need to be "touched up", they'll stay sharp.

To each his own, but the steel in the Kalinga, 420HC, comes in at or near the bottom in almost all normal knife steel users category With the exception of corrosion resistance where is it excellent. You could throw a dart at a chart of knife steels and would have at least a 95% chance of picking a better steel.

All that said, it will work, and if it suits you, suits the hell out of me and I'd certainly buy several for $50.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Gatogordo:
quote:
Not sure I agree with not liking the steel in it. It takes a good edge and is easy to touch up in the field which is a lot more than can be said with many of the new wonder steels.


Ah, but the new wonder steels, and not all of them are hard to sharpen, won't need to be "touched up", they'll stay sharp.

To each his own, but the steel in the Kalinga, 420HC, comes in at or near the bottom in almost all normal knife steel users category With the exception of corrosion resistance where is it excellent. You could throw a dart at a chart of knife steels and would have at least a 95% chance of picking a better steel.

All that said, it will work, and if it suits you, suits the hell out of me and I'd certainly buy several for $50.



Maybe but in all the years of seeing knives used in the field repeatedly every day I've never seen one that will stay sharp. They all need touching up and the harder steels can be a pain. I think that's why many guides I've seen in North America have gone to the replaceable blade knives. That's why at least for me good old carbon steel will never completely go away and is a good choice. Yes it takes some care but it is easy to produce an edge that very few other steels can reach and easy to touch up when needed.

Getting back to 420HC, I've had a Bucklite version of the 110 folding hunter for many years and been through a lot of animals and for a stainless I couldn't ask for more. Light, corrosion resistant, an easy to obtain a very sharp edge. Too bad they quit making them. And yes I also have a couple customs with the attendant hard steels that stay at home.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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You might want to give VG-10 a try. It's a modern stainless steel that takes a fine edge, holds it well and sharpens quite easily. It's a noticeable step up from 420HC.

I'm not sure that it's considered to be a "super steel" these days, but it's good stuff, nevertheless.


analog_peninsula
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It takes character to withstand the rigors of indolence.
 
Posts: 1558 | Location: Dallas, Tx | Registered: 02 June 2006Reply With Quote
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VG-10 is the old standby steel for many of Spyderco's knives and it will outperform 420HC all day, every day in any cutting tasks. A very good choice for a cheap using steel.

AFA knives in field that will stay sharp, the best of modern steels will stay sharp much longer than you will be able to use them cutting animals up in a day. They will get dull, of course, but not on an elk or three. Of course, you also have to know how to sharpen them.

All that said, if someone used 420HC and it works for them, suits the hell out of me.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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Thanks guys for the info on steel. tu2

lol and yes I know how to sharpen them.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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I respectfully suggest you try a Spyderco Manix 2 in S110V. I think you will be very surprised at how long it outlasts you 420HC and, while not a piece of cake, is fairly easy to sharpen.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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If that was directed at me, actually my favorite non custom for quite some time has been Helle. Their laminated stainless with a carbon edge is pretty hard to beat. Really the best of both worlds. Doesnt rust with less than carful handling and takes an edge far better than most other knives regardless of materials. Plus it's very easy to maintain as long as you don't use an aggressive sharpener. A light touch goes a long way. Really just a light honing is enough.

They used to be fairly inexpensive until hunters in North America "discovered" them. They have that old world Scandinavian quality about them that few other knives can match. They're not fancy to look at but are pure function. As much as I hate the term "scary sharp" that's exactly what they are. No other blade, factory or custom that I've had holds a candle to them. This comes from actually using knives in the field, both factory and custom for the last 60 years and I own a bunch of them.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Cougarz:
If that was directed at me, actually my favorite non custom for quite some time has been Helle. Their laminated stainless with a carbon edge is pretty hard to beat. Really the best of both worlds. Doesnt rust with less than carful handling and takes an edge far better than most other knives regardless of materials. Plus it's very easy to maintain as long as you don't use an aggressive sharpener. A light touch goes a long way. Really just a light honing is enough.

They used to be fairly inexpensive until hunters in North America "discovered" them. They have that old world Scandinavian quality about them that few other knives can match. They're not fancy to look at but are pure function. As much as I hate the term "scary sharp" that's exactly what they are. No other blade, factory or custom that I've had holds a candle to them. This comes from actually using knives in the field, both factory and custom for the last 60 years and I own a bunch of them.


I'm not going to argue the point any further since you seem to know all the answers. However, if you're a serious betting man and want to put some real money down on which is better, you take you best Helle and I'll take a sharpened Manix 110V and we can start cutting anything you want to....I would suggest hemp robe or cardboard and the Manix will SUBSTANTIALLY outperform you Helle, which BTW, I agree are good knives for the money, but have cheap ass steel, period. Like Dozier's D2. they get the best out of what they're using, but the best for that steel is not all that good.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Gatogordo:
quote:
Originally posted by Cougarz:
If that was directed at me, actually my favorite non custom for quite some time has been Helle. Their laminated stainless with a carbon edge is pretty hard to beat. Really the best of both worlds. Doesnt rust with less than carful handling and takes an edge far better than most other knives regardless of materials. Plus it's very easy to maintain as long as you don't use an aggressive sharpener. A light touch goes a long way. Really just a light honing is enough.

They used to be fairly inexpensive until hunters in North America "discovered" them. They have that old world Scandinavian quality about them that few other knives can match. They're not fancy to look at but are pure function. As much as I hate the term "scary sharp" that's exactly what they are. No other blade, factory or custom that I've had holds a candle to them. This comes from actually using knives in the field, both factory and custom for the last 60 years and I own a bunch of them.


I'm not going to argue the point any further since you seem to know all the answers. However, if you're a serious betting man and want to put some real money down on which is better, you take you best Helle and I'll take a sharpened Manix 110V and we can start cutting anything you want to....I would suggest hemp robe or cardboard and the Manix will SUBSTANTIALLY outperform you Helle, which BTW, I agree are good knives for the money, but have cheap ass steel, period. Like Dozier's D2. they get the best out of what they're using, but the best for that steel is not all that good.


Well you seem to know it all as well. So why don't we just agree to disagree. You do what you want and I'll do the same.

I don't spend much time at home cutting cardboard and hemp or following the latest trend. I am talking about using knives outside, hunting, fishing, spending extended time in the outdoors and dealing with the results of mine and others success.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Cougarz:

That's why at least for me good old carbon steel will never completely go away and is a good choice.



+1. I do not mind having to refresh the edge on a knive and much prefer that to trying to sharpen many of the modern stainless steels that you almost need a grinding wheel to sharpen. I also think the carbon blades can be sharpened to an edge superior in most cases to the stainless blades.

. . . but to be clear I do not know all the answers just what happens to work for me. Wink


Mike
 
Posts: 19461 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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Thanks Mike that's really what I was trying say.

Any knife needs to be touched up sooner or later in the field and the easier it is the better. Even if it means a little more often. Carbon does take some care which I don't mind. Maintaining my equipment is just part of the deal. Plus carbon develops a patina that stainless doesn't have.

I've noticed at least in North America the trend among guides seems to be to replaceable blade knives. I can't blame them, most people aren't very good at sharpening so just putting a fresh blade on has its attractions.

Bottom line is I like what has worked for me and someone else is certainly intitled to choose differently.


Roger
___________________________
I'm a trophy hunter - until something better comes along.
- Glen St Charles

*we band of 45-70ers*
 
Posts: 2565 | Location: Washington (wetside) | Registered: 08 February 2005Reply With Quote
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Several of the above comments only indicate that the average user doesn't need a knife made from superior steel. Like rifle scopes, the times a user really needs the optics of a S&B, Swaro, etc can usually be counted on the fingers of one hand, and often the count is zero as opposed to cheaper scopes like Leupold. The same is true for knives, and even more so if the user is only cutting up some easy animal like a deer or an elk. OTOH, try having to skin, clean and quarter 8 or 10 hogs in the dark, with a driving rain, at about 35 degrees and you'll come to appreciate the fact that you don't have to "touch up" your knives very often. Hogs, without doubt, are tougher on knife edge retention than any other Amercan game.

So, does the average user NEED a knife from superior steel? Probably not, OTOH, many people, and it seems to especially apply to hunters WANT the best equipment, which includes high end optics, best steel knives, etc.

BUT, to say that xyz common steel like O1, 420HC, or the Helle Sanvik blades are better using knives than the more modern steels designed for blade use is simply ignorant. For instance, S30V or S35V will EASILY outperform all of the above and are simple to "touch up", but you won't have to do it as often.

I don't care what anyone uses to cut with, if it suits you, it suits me, but wallowing in ignorance is a choice, stupidity is a condition.

If anyone wants to begin to understand why modern steels are better, read the below.

It doesn't say so in so many words, but the higher the vanadium carbides, which are non-existent in what is called high carbon steel, the longer and better the edge retention will be, always assuming proper handling of the steel, of course.


Crucible Steel


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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Perhaps you need to go get something to eat . . . a little testy it seems. Folks are simply expressing their opinions based on their experiences. You want to use a knife made with unobtainium steel, go for it.

Roll Eyes


Mike
 
Posts: 19461 | Registered: 03 January 2006Reply With Quote
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