THE ACCURATERELOADING.COM KNIVES AND KNIFE MAKING FORUM

Accuratereloading.com    The Accurate Reloading Forums    THE ACCURATE RELOADING.COM FORUMS  Hop To Forum Categories  Other Topics  Hop To Forums  Knives and Knife Making    What is the fascination with serrations?

Moderators: Saeed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
What is the fascination with serrations?
 Login/Join
 
one of us
Picture of TheBigGuy
posted
I understand that serrations do great for cutting rope and strap material but for anything else I personally cut, a good sharp plain edge seems to be the best.

Maybe I just don't get it.

Seriously, what am I missing?
 
Posts: 1282 | Registered: 17 September 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I agree with you. I have very rarely needed to have serrations to cut something. Of course it could be that they started out as a "tactical" feature...and as everyone knows, anything with the word tactical in its description is special. In case you are wondering, I happen to find the word tactical, when used in a description of a feature or item, to be one of the most overused, idiotic words ever invented.
 
Posts: 1511 | Location: Colorado, USA | Registered: 11 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I love them. I won't buy a knife without them or spring assist. I run a large manufacturing shop and I use it daily to cut cardboard, packing tape, nylon banding, stripping wire,etc.
 
Posts: 1271 | Location: N.J | Registered: 16 October 2004Reply With Quote
Moderator

Picture of Mark
posted Hide Post
IMHO, serrations are for the 95% of people who never sharpen knives yet want them to be able to cut.

That said, I like having serrations on my "daily chores" knife. For cutting stuff like foliage, small branches, and grapevines the serrations are nice to use and since I seem to be cutting that stuff a couple times a week it is nice to have.

However, a dedicated hunting or camp knife is completely different and I don't want serrations on those. They also tear meat if you use them for butchering.


for every hour in front of the computer you should have 3 hours outside
 
Posts: 7659 | Location: Between 2 rivers, Middle USA | Registered: 19 August 2000Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Serrations are great for utility work cutting "stuff".

I do not like them for butchering game.

For a general puropse utility knife half serrations and half regular blade works great.

I resharen my serrated blades on a Spyder Co with triangular ceramic sticks.

The grey sticks work best for me.


DOUBLE RIFLE SHOOTERS SOCIETY
 
Posts: 16134 | Location: Texas | Registered: 06 April 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I find that a partially serrated blade, like my Buck custom house 110 with BG-42 blade, works great for cutting along the sternum of deer while field dressing it.
 
Posts: 25 | Registered: 01 May 2009Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of TheBigGuy
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by kodmag1:
I find that a partially serrated blade, like my Buck custom house 110 with BG-42 blade, works great for cutting along the sternum of deer while field dressing it.


I absolutely agree with you on that. I've used serrations to cut deer sternums before myself. They do indeed work great for that. Thanks for the reminder.
 
Posts: 1282 | Registered: 17 September 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I dont like or use serrated blades either. First I am proud of my knife sharpening skills - big child says my wifeSmiler - and second when I cut myself with straight blade it heals faster than a cut with serrated blade.
 
Posts: 339 | Location: Virginia | Registered: 10 October 2009Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Rambo had them on his second movie knife; what else do you need to know?

Rich
 
Posts: 23062 | Location: SW Idaho | Registered: 19 December 2005Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of The Dane
posted Hide Post
Like the "Miracle Blade" serrated blades will cut anything but not finely/with finesse.
 
Posts: 1092 | Location: Denmark | Registered: 15 October 2001Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Serrations increase the pressure at point contact & the pressure from "drawing" the knife.
a high quality fine grained steel blade sharpened to a surgical edge is a lousy tool to cut mixed flesh & bone ( even relatively thin bone).

The best fish filleting blades have a hard steel sharpened with a moderate grit without a smooth surgical edge. The same knife model for boning game performs better with a surgical edge with fine grit.

any quality plain edge blade will do as good a job as a serrated "tactical" combination blade ( or better) on webbing etc with the rear 1/4 - 1/3 of the blade finished with a small med-coarse grit after getting the whole blade surgical sharp.

like most things in life , its horses for courses.
 
Posts: 493 | Registered: 01 September 2010Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
They're tacticool....
 
Posts: 1168 | Registered: 08 February 2010Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I have serrations on a Gerber River Shorty.



It's as "tactical" as I'm going to get, designed to cut boating line, nylon-kydex strap, and miscellaneous kayak tasks. Mostly it's intended as a "cut me free" knife to get out of being trapped in a kayak.

Serrated full length on one edge, half length on the other edge. Squared tip like a screwdriver (keeps you from stabbing into the wet-suit when cutting loose).

NRA sent me a serrated edge folder. It was a membership perk.

Beyond that, I want a fine edge I can sharpen on a stone.
 
Posts: 1841 | Registered: 13 January 2011Reply With Quote
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Accuratereloading.com    The Accurate Reloading Forums    THE ACCURATE RELOADING.COM FORUMS  Hop To Forum Categories  Other Topics  Hop To Forums  Knives and Knife Making    What is the fascination with serrations?

Copyright December 1997-2021 Accuratereloading.com


Visit our on-line store for AR Memorabilia