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I'm looking to buy a fixed blade knife. I'd like to blade to be about 4 to 4.5 inches. I'm looking to spend between $150 and $250.

Thanks for the help!!


Go Duke!!
 
Posts: 1216 | Location: Texas | Registered: 25 January 2009Reply With Quote
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Try this link; you'll have to register which is easy:

http://www.bladeforums.com/for...2-The-Knife-Exchange
 
Posts: 134 | Location: Cebu, Philippines | Registered: 08 September 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Texas Blue Devil:
I'm looking to buy a fixed blade knife. I'd like to blade to be about 4 to 4.5 inches. I'm looking to spend between $150 and $250.

Thanks for the help!!


I've got hundreds of hand made knives that I've decided to sell down to a more reasonable number. PM me with more details of type you're interested in and I will probably have something that might work for you. I'm not giving them away, but everything will be at least reasonable or cheaper. Just as an example, for a hunting type knife I can highly recommend one of David or Jason Winston's that will run under $150 bucks and maybe less than $100 depending on exact knife.

Bladeforums is a good source as is Ebay. On ebay, be careful that you're buying a knife by a name maker. There are many fake or no name Pakistani damascus knives for sale on there at what appear to be very reasonable prices, but are pieces of junk. OTOH, there are many reasonable buys as well, take your time and learn what you're buying. Whether you care to buy one of mine or not, I'll be glad to offer my opinion if you find a blade that interests you, just ask.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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I really like offerings by Bark River Knife and Tool. I have their Canadian Special and find it a really handy knife. Blade has worked well for the limited bit of skinning I've done with it (2 deer and a hog).
 
Posts: 1279 | Location: Shelton, CT | Registered: 22 February 2010Reply With Quote
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I don't know what you have in mind exactly but for using knives My new fav is Blind Horse Knives. They make a very good blade.







Two other favs of mine are Moore Maker, and Bark River.
 
Posts: 2376 | Location: Idaho Panhandle | Registered: 27 November 2001Reply With Quote
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If you know how to sharpen a knife, Bob Dozier makes a very good working knife. On the web and at AG Russell.com
 
Posts: 1991 | Location: Sinton, TX | Registered: 16 June 2013Reply With Quote
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Texas Blue Devil,

I am not a "name maker" nor am I located in Pakistan. I am located in the Pacific Northwest and specialize in fixed blade hunting, skinning, and caping knives. I may have a knife of interest to you on my blog- baumgarthandmadeknives.blogspot.com , if not I also do custom work.

Thanks,
Lee
 
Posts: 569 | Location: Vancouver, WA | Registered: 28 June 2010Reply With Quote
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I'm also a Bob Dozier fan for great working knives. Check ebay and AGRussell as the Dozier shop is running a 3 year backlog on new orders.
 
Posts: 795 | Location: Missouri | Registered: 24 May 2002Reply With Quote
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In my opinion buying hand made gives you a very tiny marginal increase in utility for a very large increase in price. Buy a Buck, sharpen it well, and put the rest of the money into other things.


Quick, Cheap, or Good: Pick Two
 
Posts: 1902 | Location: Tennessee | Registered: 18 February 2007Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Vol717:
In my opinion buying hand made gives you a very tiny marginal increase in utility for a very large increase in price. Buy a Buck, sharpen it well, and put the rest of the money into other things.


I used to think this myself, and until recently I did fine using stainless steel from a few different manufactures. I have Buck knives, but they seem to loose an edge quickly. I have a Gerber in ATS34 that stays sharp much better, and a Puma that I still carry as a back up that is actually impressive.

I found two issues that I wanted to change, specifically because of my geographical location. None of my SS blades will strike a ferro rod, and the SS blades that are hard enough to stay sharp seem brittle. When hunting where it's often quite wet, being able to batton a blade to get dry starting wood is vital. In early season it probably wouldn't ever be critical, but later it could be. Part of this is a reflection of my changing the way I do things as well. I try to travel as light as possible while still keeping in mind I need to be prepared to spend an extra day or even two in the woods when I leave. I now do with a knife what I once carried a knife or three, a hatchet, and saw for.

Buck does make a knife I'd consider but have yet to get a chance to fondle and the Buck factory is only twenty minutes from my house. That knife is the Hoodlum. I've heard they are going to have a slightly shorter version as well. It was designed by an outdoorsman from this area and his thoughts were similar to mine in that he wanted a knife that could do lots well, so he could avoid having to carry lots of stuff to do each thing better. It is of high carbon steel (original was 5160) and can take abuse. With the factory so close I can go pick up seconds easily at a discount when they are available, but I don't use them because they are mostly made with 420ss.
 
Posts: 2376 | Location: Idaho Panhandle | Registered: 27 November 2001Reply With Quote
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Cold Steel master hunter. Great blade, great useable shape. I've field dressed and cut up/skinned quite a few elk and deer with it and it'll go through quite a few w/out sharpening.


Shoot straight, shoot often.
Matt
 
Posts: 1146 | Location: Wisconsin | Registered: 19 July 2001Reply With Quote
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Arno Bernard
 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Vol717:
In my opinion buying hand made gives you a very tiny marginal increase in utility for a very large increase in price. Buy a Buck, sharpen it well, and put the rest of the money into other things.


I agree. I've been carrying my Buck 105 for 18 years. It keeps an edge and I have had no problem with the 420 stainless.


......civilize 'em with a Krag
 
Posts: 291 | Location: Way out west | Registered: 23 January 2007Reply With Quote
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Utility isn't the only consideration though. People want a custom knife for the same reasons they'll buy an old Mauser, that'll never be capable of better than 1 1/2 MOA and spend 2k fixing it up. A volkswagon and a Jaguar both go from point A to point B, and you'll never legally do what the Jag can do, but...
Also, as someone who has a decent number of knives, both handmade, and production, there's definitely a difference in the fit and finish between the two, even with the higher end production knives going over $100.
Big diff between custom and the $25-50 knives. Big diff. Just the basic steel billets for a really nice custom knife can cost the bladesmith that much.
As far as utility goes, I might agree to a point. I'd also have to say though that most folks, including the many, many, survivalist wannabes with a youtube channel don't know much about sharpening and the facts about using a knife to it's potential.
 
Posts: 3628 | Location: cajun country | Registered: 04 March 2009Reply With Quote
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Matt, I still have my original Cold Steel Master Hunter in stainless steel. One of the most practical knives I've used ! tu2
 
Posts: 7636 | Registered: 10 October 2002Reply With Quote
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Bark River Fox River in A2 or 3V.


Captain Finlander
 
Posts: 480 | Registered: 03 September 2010Reply With Quote
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Utility is certainly most of it for me.
I buy a knife to use hard. I have no interest in babying an expensive knife.
A good 55 RC blade will work fine for almost anyone. If you don't believe it go check out the blades butchers use. They cut more stuff than any of us ever will. My first buck was gutted and skinned with a Schrade pocket knife (using the spey blade) by my grandfather when JFK was still sucking wind. He never saw a $100 knife. I am sure he would have made one of todays $35 knives go a long way.
 
Posts: 13978 | Location: http://www.tarawaontheweb.org/tarawa2.jpg | Registered: 03 December 2008Reply With Quote
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quote:
A good 55 RC blade will work fine for almost anyone.



Well, it depends on how often you want to sharpen it and what you're cutting. Butcher's touch up or sharpen their knives nearly constantly. In addition, they are cutting clean meat with a thin profile blade. If you use a butcher knife on a hog with dirt or mud all over it, you won't get thru making the hide cuts until you've got a dead dull blade.

Better steels and higher hardness levels provide longer usable cutting intervals between sharpening.

Any doubts, take a manila rope, and start cutting it with a butcher knife and a good knife out of S30V or similar. You'll quickly find out which works better and longer.

AFA usability goes, I will be the first to admit that few, if any, normal hunters NEED a custom knife. Most of us cut up just a few animals a year, if that.

It is the same logic as why people buy Cadillac instead of used Chevys. There is a certain pride of ownership involved, plus the Cadillac or custom knife will usually outperform the lesser examples. Without taking this rather weak analogy too far, is the difference in performance and quality worth it? Well, that depends on the individual and his tastes and his financial ability.

To my eye, some custom knives are just plain beautiful in their design and their handling qualities. Some are more utilitarian but will still usually outperform most factory blades.

It's the same reasons some people buy and use expensive custom guns with or without engraving. In fact, they probably could do as well with a carefully chosen plain (and much less expensive) factory example but they enjoy the pride of ownership and the pleasures of hunting with what they consider a better choice FOR THEM.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by richj:
Arno Bernard


Oh yeah! +1 tu2
 
Posts: 3297 | Location: South of the Equator. | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by richj:
Arno Bernard


+1 I seen a few, but don't own one yet. Pretty little knives with warthog ivory and cape buff leather.


DRSS
9.3X74 tika 512
9.3X74 SXS
Merkel 140 in 470 Nitro
 
Posts: 1258 | Registered: 07 January 2005Reply With Quote
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A little Bernard

 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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richj....that "A little Bernard" looks like a fine knife...what model name is it?..THANKS
 
Posts: 134 | Location: Eastern,USA | Registered: 03 February 2002Reply With Quote
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Not sure. I believe it's a Boar Tusk
 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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richj...I believe the model name might be the "Wild dog"
 
Posts: 134 | Location: Eastern,USA | Registered: 03 February 2002Reply With Quote
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That is sure a classy knife!
 
Posts: 3628 | Location: cajun country | Registered: 04 March 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by BigNate:
quote:
Originally posted by Vol717:
In my opinion buying hand made gives you a very tiny marginal increase in utility for a very large increase in price. Buy a Buck, sharpen it well, and put the rest of the money into other things.


I used to think this myself, and until recently I did fine using stainless steel from a few different manufactures. I have Buck knives, but they seem to loose an edge quickly. I have a Gerber in ATS34 that stays sharp much better, and a Puma that I still carry as a back up that is actually impressive.

I found two issues that I wanted to change, specifically because of my geographical location. None of my SS blades will strike a ferro rod, and the SS blades that are hard enough to stay sharp seem brittle. When hunting where it's often quite wet, being able to batton a blade to get dry starting wood is vital. In early season it probably wouldn't ever be critical, but later it could be. Part of this is a reflection of my changing the way I do things as well. I try to travel as light as possible while still keeping in mind I need to be prepared to spend an extra day or even two in the woods when I leave. I now do with a knife what I once carried a knife or three, a hatchet, and saw for.

Buck does make a knife I'd consider but have yet to get a chance to fondle and the Buck factory is only twenty minutes from my house. That knife is the Hoodlum. I've heard they are going to have a slightly shorter version as well. It was designed by an outdoorsman from this area and his thoughts were similar to mine in that he wanted a knife that could do lots well, so he could avoid having to carry lots of stuff to do each thing better. It is of high carbon steel (original was 5160) and can take abuse. With the factory so close I can go pick up seconds easily at a discount when they are available, but I don't use them because they are mostly made with 420ss.


I have a Buck Esquire(small pocket knife) that wont hold an edge worth a damn. It's in my safe and a Kershaw is in my pocket. In my opinion Bucks are way over rated.

Stepchild


NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 1326 | Location: glennie, mi. USA | Registered: 14 July 2003Reply With Quote
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I literally have over 55 knives, from famous knife makers and brands to a number of custom knife makers. Another vote for Lee Baumgart! tu2 You would not be disappointed! And the price is cetainly right! You could get two for the price that you've budgeted! tu2 Big Grin And, the finished knives are even more impressive in person! tu2
 
Posts: 17395 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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I have no problem sharpening any knife.
My deer are generally field dressed then taken to camp where there are additional knives, saws and an axe to finish with.
Most of my deer have been dressed with old carbon steel Schrade and Kershaw blades. I suspect there have been close to a hundred.

It is ok if you like something nice, but most people never use a lot of the deluxe knives meaning they are just eye candy. Perhaps the knife as a serious tool should be the subject and not eye candy.

quote:
Originally posted by Gatogordo:
quote:
A good 55 RC blade will work fine for almost anyone.



Well, it depends on how often you want to sharpen it and what you're cutting. Butcher's touch up or sharpen their knives nearly constantly. In addition, they are cutting clean meat with a thin profile blade. If you use a butcher knife on a hog with dirt or mud all over it, you won't get thru making the hide cuts until you've got a dead dull blade.

Better steels and higher hardness levels provide longer usable cutting intervals between sharpening.

Any doubts, take a manila rope, and start cutting it with a butcher knife and a good knife out of S30V or similar. You'll quickly find out which works better and longer.

AFA usability goes, I will be the first to admit that few, if any, normal hunters NEED a custom knife. Most of us cut up just a few animals a year, if that.

It is the same logic as why people buy Cadillac instead of used Chevys. There is a certain pride of ownership involved, plus the Cadillac or custom knife will usually outperform the lesser examples. Without taking this rather weak analogy too far, is the difference in performance and quality worth it? Well, that depends on the individual and his tastes and his financial ability.

To my eye, some custom knives are just plain beautiful in their design and their handling qualities. Some are more utilitarian but will still usually outperform most factory blades.

It's the same reasons some people buy and use expensive custom guns with or without engraving. In fact, they probably could do as well with a carefully chosen plain (and much less expensive) factory example but they enjoy the pride of ownership and the pleasures of hunting with what they consider a better choice FOR THEM.
 
Posts: 13978 | Location: http://www.tarawaontheweb.org/tarawa2.jpg | Registered: 03 December 2008Reply With Quote
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After looking at the Arno Bernard knives they may be what you are looking for in the price range you mentioned.

However, I would recommend trying to find a used Randall Made...depending on what your main use would be...Model 5-4, Model 7-4.5, or Model 26 with carbon steel blade may suit you best.

Just my 2 cents
 
Posts: 23 | Location: South Carolina | Registered: 19 March 2013Reply With Quote
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Arno's knives are also good. Arno is a good friend of mine, and I have done business with him for the last 10 years. I just returned from Africa, having taken and used one of my Arno Bernard croc handled knives there. The trackers fought over using it. I just had to make sure that they didn't slip away with it and try and sharpen it on a rock. tu2
 
Posts: 17395 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Go to www.knivesshipfree.com Derrick is awesome, fast shipping, he carries Arno Bernard,some beautiful knives and i also like Bark River knives just bought a fox river, 4.25" blade with cpm 3v steel and coccobolo scales. Blade is a little long for field dressing but its a great all around knife that some survival schools recommend for bushcraft also, paid about 240 dollars
 
Posts: 29 | Registered: 24 May 2013Reply With Quote
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Dominus Praedatoris:

Yes www.knivesshipfree.com is good. Have a huge Bark River Bravo 3 knife from them.

Jiri
 
Posts: 1843 | Location: Czech Republic | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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