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.11 Tini-Mite
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A question for our Australian friends... The .11 Tini-Mite is listed in ECRA as 04 025 BBR 10W and is referenced to the Illustrated Rimfire Guide, 1st Edition and to the ACCA Bulletin #65. Of the three, I only have the ECRA in hand. Now the question... with a bullet diameter of 0.1455-inches, why is it called the .11 Tini-Mite instead of the .14 Tini-Mite? Next, any idea who designed the Tini-Mite series of rimfires and when were the designed?
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Posts: 235 | Location: Ladson, SC, USA | Registered: 02 April 2002Reply With Quote
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Ed

No takers on your questions.Frowner I was kind of hoping someone would chime in. I'm not a big fan of the tiny cartridges but they do interest me a little (pun intended). The smallest that I have is the 12 Squirrel.

Anyway, don't the "tini-mite" cartridges, at some point, become the "miti-mite"? Maybe it's 17 caliber and not 14, I don't really know.

I assume you've quizzed all the usual suspects. Saubier, etc.

I think you know Gordon M. out in Stockton who collects the baby cartridges? Maybe he would know. I don't think he reads this Forum. I can give you his e-mail if you want to PM me.

Good Luck

Ray Meketa


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Posts: 1560 | Location: Arizona Mountains | Registered: 11 October 2004Reply With Quote
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Arthur Langsford of Myras Sports Store in Broken Hill, South Australia, designed and sold the Myra Mite series of rimfire cartridges back in the early 70's
Years ahead of Hornady Cool
There was a cartridge called the Myra 17 Mite, I have a 1972 Australian Shooters Journal advertising it. I dont have info on all the variations he played with and he may have done 14's.There was another South Aus gunsmith (Bill Hambly-Clarke) playing with 14 Walker centrefires about that time. A person posts on here under the name of Con. He has a collection of old gun magazines and may be able to give you some more info if you PM him
In 1974 there was an add for the Myra 17 Tini-Mite claiming 3000fps for a 20gn hollow point. If you post on the Australian Hunting Net forum I'm sure someone will be able to help you


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Posts: 28 | Location: downunder | Registered: 29 August 2004Reply With Quote
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My thanks to you both. This is more information than I had and every little bit helps. I do know Gordon and will email him tonight. I'll also hit the Australian Hunting Net forum (if I can find it!).
tbolt... if you can email me a scanned copy of that ad, I'd really appreciate it. I'm more than a little weak on the Australian wildcats.
Regards,
Ed


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Posts: 235 | Location: Ladson, SC, USA | Registered: 02 April 2002Reply With Quote
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Arthur Langsford's shop was in outback NSW not south Australia. Arthur designed 4 .17 cal rimfires in the 1970's, these I think were the minor mite, minni mite, tiny mite and the .17 vixen.

The mites were based on the .22 short, long rifle and CCI stinger or rat shot cartridges respectivly. The .17 vixen was based on the .22 WMR, and was reportedly able to drive a .17 cal 25 grain bullet at close to 3000 fps, which puts it a fair bit ahead of the .17 HMR. Loaded ammo was sold under the myra brand name, along with other calibers.

Arthur also experimented with extruder barrels which were chamberd for the .22 lr, but as the bullet passed down the bore it was swaged down to either .20 or .17 cal. I also have an article here somwhere, and from memory the hitting power was increased, as was the velocity. I dont think that the .17 cal version was ever really nailed as twist rates of around 1:7 were tried but they were not fast enough to stabilise a 40 grain .17 cal bullet. Funny how all this experimenting was happening in a remote outback town 30 years befor hornady got around to making the .17 HMR and M2.

Steve
 
Posts: 62 | Location: yarra valley Australia | Registered: 04 January 2008Reply With Quote
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Arthur Langford was in business - Myras Gunshop - in Broken Hill IIRC. Business was named after his wife.

He certainly pre-dated the American companies with necked-down .22 cases , and also developed a variety of centrefire calibres as well - the .243 Myra and .25 Myra based on the .222 case spring to mind , as well as a .35 based on the 308 Winchester case.


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Posts: 4372 | Location: Eltham , New Zealand | Registered: 13 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Thanks to you both for the excellent information!
I've succeeded in duplicating the brass for the .17 Myra Vixen, including a couple that unexpectedly detonated during the forming process! I was intrigued by the .08 caliber version, but it was the dimensions given by ECRA for the .11 that threw me for a loop.
I did manage to make contact with Andre Johansen and purchased his "Illustrated Rimfire Guide". ECRA listed it as a reference source for the .11 and, sure enough, they reported the data accurately from the reference. Still wondering if Mr. Johansen got the data wrong or got the name wrong.


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Posts: 235 | Location: Ladson, SC, USA | Registered: 02 April 2002Reply With Quote
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