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Daniel Fraser 7.65x53
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Picture of yumastepside
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Does anyone have any other pics of this rifle? specifically the left hand side with the take-down screws??



Roger
 
Posts: 870 | Location: Was NSW, now Tas Australia | Registered: 27 June 2009Reply With Quote
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Posts: 3155 | Location: SC,USA | Registered: 07 March 2002Reply With Quote
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Also a couple on GI
 
Posts: 887 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: 04 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Picture of yumastepside
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Thanks, but I'm after a view of this.....



Roger
 
Posts: 870 | Location: Was NSW, now Tas Australia | Registered: 27 June 2009Reply With Quote
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That looks like a lever lock. Too far forward to lock the barrel to the receiver. Likely an alternative means to lock the forend.
 
Posts: 3155 | Location: SC,USA | Registered: 07 March 2002Reply With Quote
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I would like to see it as well. With no visible joint line looks as if the wood comes clear of all the metal. Please post pictures if you find them. I have lots of saved Fraser rifle pictures but never seen this.
 
Posts: 887 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: 04 April 2009Reply With Quote
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The Fraser take downs I have seen and owned have all been like the one at Hallowell's with a large slotted screw in the left receiver ring that locks the barrel in place when it is assembled. All those have separated the forend just at the front edge of the receiver ring.

The one shown in Roger's initial post and the detail picture with the red-circled lever is new to me, and it separates the forend quite a bit further from the receiver ring. My guess is that the red-circled lever has nothing specifically to do with the take down mechanism; I'll bet that lever is the magazine cutoff that's part of "Edward's Patented Magazine", along with the extension of the bottom metal forward of the magazine box.

It appears that to take down this rifle one would first remove the forend using the described Deely latch, then release the left receiver screw locking the barrel and give the barrel a quarter turn (or fully turn it out) to remove it from the receiver.

I'd be very curious to see the mechanism for the Edward's cutoff feature.

Fraser bolt rifles are lovely pieces of work and he made some in a rimless version of the 303 British round as well as in his version of the 7,65 Mauser, along with many others of course.
 
Posts: 835 | Location: paradise with an ocean view | Registered: 09 April 2002Reply With Quote
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Picture of yumastepside
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I did find another description for the same rifle and it mentioned a cutoff but no other info.....you may be on to something Steve !

Roger
 
Posts: 870 | Location: Was NSW, now Tas Australia | Registered: 27 June 2009Reply With Quote
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Interesting, that is a 1895 Mauser action.
See the little rectangle tab behind the bolt handle, and the long shaped sleeve.

J Wisner
 
Posts: 1284 | Location: Chehalis, Washington | Registered: 02 April 2003Reply With Quote
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I'd guess (and only a guess) that the lever in question works somewhat like the Harris Lever-magazine depresser on the Ross rifle.
Or something like the cartridge interupter in a Mosin Nagant rifle

The Ross Harris system was to allow the magazine follower to be depressed all the way to the bottom of the magazine.
Then the loose rounds dumped into the magazine box from above. The depressor released and the rounds were again under mag spring tension.

Maybe this uses a similar lever system to simply lower the follower with the round(s) in the magazine but still under spring tension.
Maybe it doesn't lower the follower but instead inserts a plate over the top round to push the rounds down into the magazine a small amt.
More like the SMLE cut-off does.

Holding the top round just below the point where the bolt can pick it up to chamber it.
Snap the lever on the forend the other direction and the rounds are released and are pushed to the top of the mag box under spring tension. Ready for the bolt to pick them up when cycled.

The MN cartridge interupter is a simple flat steel feed lip that pivots lengthwise in the left wall of the action. It holds the second in line cartridge down out of the way till the first cart is fed into the chamber. They do this to avoid rims from inter locking.
But the same idea could be used to hold the rounds down in the mag as a cut off if designed as such.

More coffee.
 
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you need redding dies for that let me know. NIB
 
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quote:
I'd guess (and only a guess) that the lever in question works somewhat like the Harris Lever-magazine depresser on the Ross rifle.
Or something like the cartridge interupter in a Mosin Nagant rifle



I think you are exactly correct.
I have a Lee Speed with the Harris Charger and it is quite similar to this one.
 
Posts: 2748 | Location: Colorado U.S.A. | Registered: 24 December 2004Reply With Quote
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