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9,3 x 64R
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It's possible to obtain (or to make) cases of this brother of the legendary 9,3 x 64 Brenneke?
I'm sorry for my bud English and thanks in advance.
Hector
 
Posts: 328 | Location: San Martin de los Andes, Argentina | Registered: 01 May 2001Reply With Quote
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Hector

the rimmed version ( 9.3 x 65R ) was introduced in 1930 and I would imagine that RWS and maybe Lapua or Norma still make brass. Failing that Wolfgang Romy in Germany makes a lot of calibres as well.

I dont know what other caliber you could form cases from.


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Posts: 4362 | Location: Eltham , New Zealand | Registered: 13 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Muzza
Thank you for the answer, but I have another problem, this (9,3x64R) is not the cartridge for the double rifle ofered to me, it's 9,3x64 Mauser (D.W.M. 636) NOT BRENNEKE!! (I have one rifle in this caliber brenneke).
I do not know this cartridge!
Regards.
Hector
 
Posts: 328 | Location: San Martin de los Andes, Argentina | Registered: 01 May 2001Reply With Quote
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So - is this cartridge rimmed or not?

If it is the rimless round( and there doesnt appear to be a rimmed version )then it is a very scarce caliber.

Listed by RWS from 1912 to 1928. The case has a smaller head size than the 9.3 x 64 Brenneke and is refered to as the .465" Head.

I suspect you may well have more luck finding rocking-horse turd than cases for this rifle - but then again guys like Bruce Bertram in Australia make some weird stuff. Check out his website - do a google search for him.

Cant offer much more than that , not very helpfull- sorry. Good luck with the search.


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Posts: 4362 | Location: Eltham , New Zealand | Registered: 13 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Hector, this is such a scarce chambering it is a task to even find a single round for a collection. I cannot imagine any manufacturer, even Bertram, investing in the tooling to produce brass.

After consulting my case forming references (which do not address the .465" head x64 Mauser) and looking at the drawings, the only way I can conceive of making the brass would require custom tooling and a hydraulic press. With the tooling and the force available from the press, you can swadge, in multiple steps, the wall and head areas of the Brenneke brass, reducing them by 0.040" . . . then you could use standard dies and fireforming to adapt the rest of the case to the Mauser dimensions. Likely there would be issues of annealing and trimming along the way. It would be a very expensive and laborious task, but I believe it possible.
 
Posts: 219 | Location: NH, USA | Registered: 12 May 2002Reply With Quote
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I'm sending you a copy of another thread that may be of some help to you. I'd be for checking all the vaarious calibrs - dimensins wise - and trying to find something I could use to form the cases - starting with the .376 Steyr.. Hope this helps!
__________________________________________

There are/were five commercial 9.3's, all originating in Germany I believe. In the 1890's there was the 9.3x72R. Pretty whimpy with it's black powder roots. It was replaced in 1900 with the 9.3x74R which was and is made in fine double guns, single shots and drillings. (A drilling is a double barreled shotgun with a single rifle barrel underneath.) The ballistics of the 9.3x74 are a 286 grain bullet at 2360 fps. Later when the M-98 Mauser became available for commercial purposes, the 8x57 case was necked to first 9mm then to 9.3 mm and became the 9.3x57. It could not match the 74R's ballistics so the case was remade bigger and better by Otto Bock in 1905 and the 9.3x62 Mauser was born. It's ballistics would match the 74R's because we new it worked and good bullets were available for it. This is the rifle the Germans took to Africa and it was used so successfully it became a legend in the game fields in just a few years. Model 98 Mausers chambered in the 9.3x62 were plentiful and that was the one rifle to own if you were a farmer or settler in any part of German Colonial Africa. In 1958 when Kenya established the 375 bore size as the minimum for taking dangerous game an exception was made to include the 9.3x62 Mauser. Shortly after the 9.3x62 was developed, actually about the time the British brought out the 375H&H, Wilhelm Brenneke of Germany came up with his 9.3x64. This is a larger bolt head (about.495"), than the .473" of the 62mm case and obviously 2mm longer. It would hold a bit more powder and would launch the 286 grain bulllet at over 2600 fps. Well the bullet makers wern't ready for the high velocity of this new 9.3 and it's bullets would break up and not penetrate well. It's performance in the game fields finally sucked in enough sea water that it quickly went under. Actually with the good bullets we have today, it is a slayer of great beasts and ever bit the equal of the 375H&H. It still lives but only in Europe and that truly is a shame because of it's impressive beltless ballistics.
Ammo and Brass are not readily available for the 9.3x64 here in the U.S., my source has dried up. It can be found but not without effort. It cannot be made from any existing caliber but an odd thing came about a few years back, Hornady and Steyr conspired together to make the 376 Steyr and that case is just a shortened 9.3x64 mauser! (shortened to 60 mm) So Hornady could make the brass by just long drawing the 376. By the way the 376 necked down to 338 is an absolutely wonderful 338 mag. it matches Winchester ballistics and no belt.

There are, however, no flies on the 9.3x62. It has survived for 100 years and is still going very strong around the globe drawing new fans every day here in the U.S. Norma and Lapua load factory ammo and that is available here. It is the most popular metric in Alaska and would be a top three candidate for the most perfect all round caliber for use anywhere. I have owned eight I think, but sadly have let them all go to good homes. At least two of them make frequent trips to the Dark Continent to draw fresh blood and gather more material for camp fire stories. Speakin of which, this one must end.
Good shootin'.

Murphy


Lord, give me patience 'cuz if you give me strength I'll need bail money!!
'TrapperP'
 
Posts: 3742 | Location: Moving on - Again! | Registered: 25 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Should have checked it out first - the .376 Steyr has a .495 head so it is .030 bigger than what you are looking for. Sorry.
After looking some further, I wonder if you could form cases from the 7X64 Brenneke?? The dimensions look closer than anything else I have found.


Lord, give me patience 'cuz if you give me strength I'll need bail money!!
'TrapperP'
 
Posts: 3742 | Location: Moving on - Again! | Registered: 25 December 2003Reply With Quote
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Just a note: RWS still lists two loading for this cartridge in its catalog. The 6.5X63 Messner Magnum wildcat used the basic case from the 9.3X64. This wildcat recently got CIP (european equivilent of SAMMI) recognition and is now a regular factory load. This being the situation there should be plenty of cases, components, etc. available.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 23 October 2007Reply With Quote
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