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M1917 needs some sights
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My grandfather did the sporterizing. What was described as a kinematic mount used to hold a scope in place.

Those parts have been lost in the mists of time. I don't know if the mount was custom or not.

Hoping someone more informed than myself recognizes these parts - or has some suggestions.

Some pics

Flickr pics
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 21 August 2020Reply With Quote
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Very interesting!

Though I'm not as familiar with the M17 as most US AR members, it looks as though it has been custom made using the original ears

The V at the front looks inspired by the Fisher Adjusto-Mount and the rear cones are redolent of the Stith Master Mount or B&L, but I can't picture how the levers out the back work. The slot in the front receiver ring looks intended to hold a Stith-style spring but I don't suppose it made the rifle stronger.
 
Posts: 4232 | Location: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: 31 March 2009Reply With Quote
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Yes, I have a suggestion; remove all that hideous iron and put some real scope mounts on it. Meaning Leopold.
 
Posts: 13911 | Location: USA | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by dpcd:
Yes, I have a suggestion; remove all that hideous iron and put some real scope mounts on it. Meaning Leopold.



Followed by getting rid of that kitchen-drawer knob on the cocking piece. Looks like a damned Springfield.

It's definitely different-looking. I personally like taking sporterized Enfield stocks and fixing them up, especially the P14's. They seem to fit me, and I like the unadorned functionality of them. I'm not sure what's lurking under the black paint; hopefully not lumps of fiberglass or Bondo. If it's wood, I'd be inclined to try refinishing. It's not a showpiece, for sure, but if it shoots well, it can be a great hunter or utility gun. Of course, I'm on record as being an Enfield fan. It's unusual, that's for sure.
 
Posts: 274 | Registered: 01 January 2019Reply With Quote
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Since there's some family history to it, I would be inclined to see if the existing set-up could be reused, with some scope ring(s) near the middle holding a flat spring inserted into that slot, with the back end under the cotton-reel, somehow so it doesn't shunt out.

But first I'd want to know exactly how it works. Does the cotton reel provide elevation and windage? You still see Bausch & Lomb 'Custom' scopes (with no turrets) for sale on the Internet, if it does.

Failing that, yes, Leupold STD or even better Burris Universal mounts with Signature ringings would be my choice.
 
Posts: 4232 | Location: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: 31 March 2009Reply With Quote
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I have a semi sporterized Model of 1917 stock. Way back when I guess your dad was considerably younger and probably not with a surplus of funds. It was very common to notch the stock where the standard pistol grip was. And then to proceed to clean it up with chisels and fit a regular pistol grip in place. Looks like a darn good job was done. I have one like it except where the joints are,is a bunch of plastic wood. And since the P14 that came with that stock
has had the trashed barrel taken off. The belly in the trigger guard has been straightened. And the stock modified to accomodate the straightened trigger guard. That's what's under the black paint and as the glue dries out and ages you cab see the old glue lines. Thanks for sharing, haven't seen a nice stock in years. Frank
 
Posts: 173 | Registered: 16 November 2008Reply With Quote
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Looks similar to a Kuharsky Bros. Stith, or Bausch and Lomb style. Unlike those mounts, this system seems to be custom made. The rear bridge and sight ears appear to have been carefully machined to make the supports for the spindle. The front V may have acted as a scope support under the front spindle. I see there is a a hole drilled in the receiver ring and what may be a spring notch milled into the rear of the ring. Very unique. I doubt you will find replacement parts. You may want to rummage through grandpa's things again if you can.

May have looked similar to this:

https://images.gunsinternation...0522F36FC87794B.jpeg
 
Posts: 2779 | Location: SC,USA | Registered: 07 March 2002Reply With Quote
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You will never find those old parts.
Take your angle grinder with cut off wheel and saw off the ears. Contour the bridge to take modern base; I use Savage 110 flat one piece bases, but others work too. Some times you have to fill in the duck pond. Better yet I will sell you a receiver already done.
Nostalgia is fine, but sometimes impractical.
 
Posts: 13911 | Location: USA | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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Looking at the photo, the front ring mount has a piece the fits the notch in the back of the front receiver ring and indexes into the half octagon piece on the barrel. The rear mount looks like it has a piece that mates down and forward into it. It looks like the lever on the right side locks everything in place. It actually looks like a reasonably ingenious quick detachable mount system. I suspect that if you find the rifle scope off of it you will find the other half of the mount. I would search for it first. Second would be to find a good machinist/mechanical designer, as I bet they can figure out how to make the other half. Not cheap, but if the rifle has sentimental value, worth the effort. If you cannot find the scope, PM me with additional pictures of the front, rear, and both bases, and I will see if I can give you some additional hints with how it looks like it works.


One morning I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got into my pajamas I'll never know. - Groucho Marx
 
Posts: 3586 | Location: Eastern Slope, Colorado, USA | Registered: 01 March 2001Reply With Quote
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