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Picture of subsailor74
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I have always wanted to buy an M1 carbine, but I know NOTHING about military rifles. When I look at rifles on line, they seem to range in price from $600 - $6000 and range in condition from a made up rifle with old and new parts to one that is in new, unissued condition. I am looking for a rifle I will shoot fairly often, that is reliable, and that is in as original condition as possible. I am not a collector, so I am not interested in paying a premium for an uncommon variant. So, where do I go and what do I buy? Who are the reputable dealers for M1 carbines out there? What should I expect to pay? Am I better off buying a reproduction like the one sold by the Fulton Armory?
I would really appreciate input from knowledgable folks here as I am starting from gound zero!
 
Posts: 1580 | Location: Virginia | Registered: 29 September 2011Reply With Quote
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I was in your boat as well, pun intended...

I would buy a reproduction for a shooter. The one I got was passed to me as an original paratrooper carbine, and not only did I discover the guy was FOS, but the reciever Was cracked.

This was in the early 90’s and now for a total of $2k, I have a plinker with a replacement receiver.
 
Posts: 6742 | Location: Minnesota USA | Registered: 15 June 2007Reply With Quote
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I have owned 20 of them; whilst the reproductions are good shooters, buying a WW2 one will retain it's value better.
Look at Simpson's website. And on Gunbroker.
Come over and we will shoot some of all types. Old and new.
Of course, don't buy one with a cracked receiver!
Most common are Inlands, Saginaw steering gear, divisions of General Motors. People like Winchesters because of the name. And Rock Ola due to the juke box maker. There were about ten makers.
 
Posts: 13896 | Location: USA | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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Thank you both for the information and advice. After a lengthy conversation with my local gunsmith, I decided to order a Fulton Armory M1 carbine. As I am interested only in shooting the rifle, this seemed to best suit my needs.
 
Posts: 1580 | Location: Virginia | Registered: 29 September 2011Reply With Quote
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The M1 carbine is nothing but pure fun to shoot. I hesitate to call it the absolute most enjoyable, but certainly near the top of any list.


When a politician uses the words "common sense ", you'd better keep one hand on your wallet and the other on your firearms.
 
Posts: 472 | Location: Texas | Registered: 07 January 2015Reply With Quote
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Maybe fun, but per a Korean War veteran I know, they will not stop a Chinese People's Liberation Army soldier wearing a padded winter coat, with multiple shots. He will get to your position every time and lob a grenade at you.
Only an M1 Rifle or 1919 would stop them and even then they keep running up the hill. True story.
 
Posts: 13896 | Location: USA | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by dpcd:
Maybe fun, but per a Korean War veteran I know, they will not stop a Chinese People's Liberation Army soldier wearing a padded winter coat, with multiple shots. He will get to your position every time and lob a grenade at you.
Only an M1 Rifle or 1919 would stop them and even then they keep running up the hill. True story.


Brings to mind a quote by Dr. Atwater, of Aberdeen Proving Ground fame, describing the M1 carbine:

"If you shoot me with this thing, and I find out about it...."
 
Posts: 274 | Registered: 01 January 2019Reply With Quote
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Can't comment on that except to say my father used his as his primary self defense weapon. I once popped off about it being an anemic round and he advised me that he had real world experience with one and felt completely comfortable carrying it. As he was a WW2 veteran who had seen combat in the Pacific I couldn't argue with him.


When a politician uses the words "common sense ", you'd better keep one hand on your wallet and the other on your firearms.
 
Posts: 472 | Location: Texas | Registered: 07 January 2015Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by hogfarmer:
Can't comment on that except to say my father used his as his primary self defense weapon. I once popped off about it being an anemic round and he advised me that he had real world experience with one and felt completely comfortable carrying it. As he was a WW2 veteran who had seen combat in the Pacific I couldn't argue with him.


The best weapon is often the one that you're comfortable with, since you're more likely to place a good shot. And while we're denigrating the poor M1 carbine, we should keep in mind that it was not intended to be an alternative to the Garand; it's stated purpose was to provide a light carry weapon for officers and troops who would otherwise be depending solely on the .45 Auto or the Thompson. In that light, it compares much better.
 
Posts: 274 | Registered: 01 January 2019Reply With Quote
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Picture of subsailor74
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quote:
Originally posted by dpcd:
I have owned 20 of them; whilst the reproductions are good shooters, buying a WW2 one will retain it's value better.
Look at Simpson's website. And on Gunbroker.
Come over and we will shoot some of all types. Old and new.
Of course, don't buy one with a cracked receiver!
Most common are Inlands, Saginaw steering gear, divisions of General Motors. People like Winchesters because of the name. And Rock Ola due to the juke box maker. There were about ten makers.


I thought more about your advice and bought a late manufacture Inland carbine from Simpson's as well as ordering one from Fulton Armory - again, thanks for the advice.
 
Posts: 1580 | Location: Virginia | Registered: 29 September 2011Reply With Quote
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Midway USA has surplus 30 Carbine ammunition on sale. South Korean manufactured, non corrosive.

Decent price.
 
Posts: 1077 | Location: Land of Lincoln | Registered: 15 June 2004Reply With Quote
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thanks!
 
Posts: 1580 | Location: Virginia | Registered: 29 September 2011Reply With Quote
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I have a set of RCBS reloading dies with a carbide full length sizing die I would sell for $45.00 shipped. If you are interested.

Hip
 
Posts: 579 | Location: Long Island, New York | Registered: 04 January 2008Reply With Quote
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It’s an interesting gun and round. I’ve wanted an M1 Carbine and also the old AMT pistol for a long time.


I meant to be DSC Member...bad typing skills.

Marcus Cady

DRSS
 
Posts: 3008 | Location: Dallas | Registered: 19 March 2008Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by cdsx:
quote:
Originally posted by hogfarmer:
Can't comment on that except to say my father used his as his primary self defense weapon. I once popped off about it being an anemic round and he advised me that he had real world experience with one and felt completely comfortable carrying it. As he was a WW2 veteran who had seen combat in the Pacific I couldn't argue with him.


The best weapon is often the one that you're comfortable with, since you're more likely to place a good shot. And while we're denigrating the poor M1 carbine, we should keep in mind that it was not intended to be an alternative to the Garand; it's stated purpose was to provide a light carry weapon for officers and troops who would otherwise be depending solely on the .45 Auto or the Thompson. In that light, it compares much better.


very true, but give me a 1911 instead!
 
Posts: 5338 | Location: Ohio | Registered: 02 April 2003Reply With Quote
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Which is highly overrated; and hard to hit an adversary at 200 yards. I carried one for 20 years. Until we got the Berettas.
I have seen guys shot with 45s; not much to report. Not nearly as much "stopping power" as all the hype says it has. Ok, one of our soldiers shot himself in the head; that did stop him. But I had a supply sergeant who decided to off himself; shot centered in the guts; hurt so much he drove himself to the hospital. And others. Of course the 30 carbine has little as well. But the military is not concerned with stopping power; in fact such a concept is prohibited by the Geneva Accords. Which we didn't sign. Another story.
 
Posts: 13896 | Location: USA | Registered: 02 August 2009Reply With Quote
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A late neighbor friend in the next block had one of each make.
I never got to see them. Teen kids next door to me broke in and stole six of them.

Ruined his collection for sure. NRA gun insurance
paid the claim enough to make Norm happy again.

He died a couple years later.

Since he had the ???? machine gun license for his Tommy gun.
I'd bet all his carbine's were select fire too.
I met him at the local indoor 50' range shooting his Tommy. "yeah, we're neighbors". Hell of a deal!

He also had a fully redconditoned military Jeep.
Lovely to look at.

Have another buddy that owns a 'few' carbines. He was an armorer in the Marines so I'd bet his have the switch too.

George


"Gun Control is NOT about Guns'
"It's about Control!!"
Join the NRA today!"

LM: NRA, DAV, RMEF

George L. Dwight
 
Posts: 5162 | Location: Pueblo, CO | Registered: 31 January 2006Reply With Quote
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