THE ACCURATERELOADING.COM RIMFIRE FORUM


Moderators: Saeed
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
cleaning Rim Fire Rifle 22lr
 Login/Join
 
one of us
posted
Has anyone used a borescope on a 22lr when shooting lead bullets? What is the thing to be concerned of most? Is it lead fouling,carbon,powder? Is there anything that is not easily removed with solvent and a brush?
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of Grenadier
posted Hide Post
I use dental floss and toothpaste. Not only does it prevent cavities but it leaves the bore smelling clean and minty.




.
 
Posts: 10899 | Location: North of the Columbia | Registered: 28 April 2008Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Grenadier:
I use dental floss and toothpaste. Not only does it prevent cavities but it leaves the bore smelling clean and minty.

I use sun bright lemon liquid
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of drhall762
posted Hide Post
quote:
Is there anything that is not easily removed with solvent and a brush?


No. I use a bore brush, patches and Hoppe's #9. Has worked for 40 years. Don't think I'll change.


Dave

In 100 years who of us will care?
An armed society is a polite society!
Just because they say you are paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.
 
Posts: 899 | Location: Ammon, NC | Registered: 31 December 2013Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by drhall762:
quote:
Is there anything that is not easily removed with solvent and a brush?


No. I use a bore brush, patches and Hoppe's #9. Has worked for 40 years. Don't think I'll change.


Same here, though I seldom clean my CZ. I only take action if crud prevents a round from chambering smoothly, or if the extractor looks bad (in which case I clean the bolt face).

As for flossing, the benefits of flossing are suspect, at best. coffee
 
Posts: 898 | Location: Grants Pass, OR | Registered: 24 September 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of drhall762
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by B L O'Connor:
quote:
Originally posted by drhall762:
quote:
Is there anything that is not easily removed with solvent and a brush?


No. I use a bore brush, patches and Hoppe's #9. Has worked for 40 years. Don't think I'll change.


Same here, though I seldom clean my CZ. I only take action if crud prevents a round from chambering smoothly, or if the extractor looks bad (in which case I clean the bolt face).

As for flossing, the benefits of flossing are suspect, at best. coffee


Agreed. Over cleaning may be the ruin of many a good .22 rifle.


Dave

In 100 years who of us will care?
An armed society is a polite society!
Just because they say you are paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.
 
Posts: 899 | Location: Ammon, NC | Registered: 31 December 2013Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of Bren7X64
posted Hide Post
I haven't cleaned my Brno no1 since I got it in the 80s - it still shoots 10 rounds into a thumbnail-size group at 70 yards.

I give it a wipe-down externally when I put it away and clean the bolt face every 200 rounds or so.


--
Promise me, when I die, don't let my wife sell my guns for what I told I her I paid for them.
 
Posts: 1048 | Location: Canberra, Australia | Registered: 03 August 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I clean the bores of my 22's about once a year. Probably not needed, but I feel better.

Dave
 
Posts: 2086 | Location: Seattle Washington, USA | Registered: 19 January 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I Have two Ruger Mark II's. I brush the chamber about once a year. When the trigger starts to feel "gritty", I clean the action. Almost never clean the bore as standard velocity waxed bullets don't produce much leading. When the bore does get cleaned it's with a patch pulled through with a piece of weed eater string with a button melted on the end (no brush).
 
Posts: 290 | Location: Gettysburg, PA | Registered: 03 August 2005Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of Evan K.
posted Hide Post
Ultimately it depends on what your accuracy standards are and how consistent it needs to shoot. For a minute-of-squirrel sporter I may scrub the bore once a year (and will clean the exterior after each use) but for target rifles I may pull patches after every single target. The sporter has a much looser chamber compared to the short and tight match chambers in target rifles so they just aren't as finicky in the first place. What I'm concerned about is the ring of carbon and lead that forms at the mouth and leade of the chamber where it meets at the rifling, and how big of a window you get before the buildup starts to affect things downrange. Some need to be cleaned very often and some barely need it. I've been able to use a Hawkeye borescope a few times and it can be interesting to compare before/after cleaning to see exactly where and how fouling builds up in the rifle. This is the chamber mouth in my Suhl 150 through a borescope:



I expect it to consistently shoot groups under .2" at 50 yards with the right lot of Eley Match and have learned it does best with the barrel pretty clean. I will pull 2-3 dry patches down the bore immediately after shooting a target while the wax and fouling is still soft to slow down the carbon ring buildup and will scrub it down bare with Iosso bore paste every 400-500 rounds or so, when I start to notice unexplained fliers. It takes four shots to get it back on zero after pulling patches.

If you use a good one piece cleaning rod with a tight fitting bore guide (and don't gorilla the cleaning rod), you are not going to damage anything. It's the improper cleaning that does it.

This is a really in-depth article on rimfire cleaning: http://www.rrdvegas.com/rimfire-cleaning.html


"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy."
 
Posts: 761 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 05 September 2006Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of Pa.Frank
posted Hide Post
Your supposed to clean 22's?

I haven't put a brush or patch through my 581 ever... and I've had it a dn shot it for over 40 years. still shoots and functions fine... the squirrels, pigeons, and miscellaneous other critters never noticed the difference


NRA Benefactor.

Life is tough... It's even tougher when you're stupid... John Wayne
 
Posts: 1894 | Location: The Three Lower Counties (Delaware USA) | Registered: 13 September 2001Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Evan K.:
Ultimately it depends on what your accuracy standards are and how consistent it needs to shoot. For a minute-of-squirrel sporter I may scrub the bore once a year (and will clean the exterior after each use) but for target rifles I may pull patches after every single target. The sporter has a much looser chamber compared to the short and tight match chambers in target rifles so they just aren't as finicky in the first place. What I'm concerned about is the ring of carbon and lead that forms at the mouth and leade of the chamber where it meets at the rifling, and how big of a window you get before the buildup starts to affect things downrange. Some need to be cleaned very often and some barely need it. I've been able to use a Hawkeye borescope a few times and it can be interesting to compare before/after cleaning to see exactly where and how fouling builds up in the rifle. This is the chamber mouth in my Suhl 150 through a borescope:



I expect it to consistently shoot groups under .2" at 50 yards with the right lot of Eley Match and have learned it does best with the barrel pretty clean. I will pull 2-3 dry patches down the bore immediately after shooting a target while the wax and fouling is still soft to slow down the carbon ring buildup and will scrub it down bare with Iosso bore paste every 400-500 rounds or so, when I start to notice unexplained fliers. It takes four shots to get it back on zero after pulling patches.

If you use a good one piece cleaning rod with a tight fitting bore guide (and don't gorilla the cleaning rod), you are not going to damage anything. It's the improper cleaning that does it.

This is a really in-depth article on rimfire cleaning: http://www.rrdvegas.com/rimfire-cleaning.html

Thanks for that helpful picture.That is about what I use as a cleaning routine.I try to clean right after a trip to the range to prevent fouling from hardening and sticking.I also use a paste about every 500rds.What borescope where you using and would that do well fore my big bores too?
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
2 patches with Clensoil after shooting. That's all.


NRA Benefactor Member
US Navy Veteran
 
Posts: 703 | Location: Brownstown, Michigan | Registered: 19 April 2015Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Here is my CZ again.This time right after a good cleaning.You can see it took about five rds to settle before shooting 4 in the bulls eye open sights at 100yds.The 308win Walther Lothar barrelled rifle shot well too right after a good scrubbing and no fouler required.All open sight shooting at 100yds.This was my routine sighting in check before my offhand shooting routine.

[URL= ]100yds open sights/off the bench/[/URL]
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Here is a combination of my Cz 22LR and my 308 target rifle offhand, open sights at 100yds during a snow shower.Some of the shots outside of the orange where sighting in and fouling shots before adjustment.

[URL= ]100yds/offhand/open sights[/URL]
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Your supposed to clean 22's?


Very seldom for sure.
 
Posts: 18149 | Location: wis | Registered: 21 April 2001Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Depends on the firearm and your accuracy standards. The bullseye and B/R shooters that I know NEVER use a brush. They use a patch soaked in solvent and pull it through (breech to bore) with a "string" for want of a better term.
Peter


Be without fear in the face of your enemies. Be brave and upright, that God may love thee. Speak the truth always, even if it leads to your death. Safeguard the helpless and do no wrong;
 
Posts: 10478 | Location: Jacksonville, Florida | Registered: 09 January 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
when i clean my 1022 custom i use one of the plastic coated gun cleaning cables and a patch soaked in hoppe's then pull a dry patch though then pull a patch soaked with remoil through.......... i still try not to let anything touch the crown of the barrel........
 
Posts: 1317 | Registered: 27 August 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I am beginning to like 22's.What I think would be a great help would be a very heavy 22.That way you can shoot it a lot and really strengthen your hold.Come to think of it, if I ever wear out my CZ,I will rebore with a heavy barrel.
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
The NS 522 is such a rifle. Imported by Kengs it was favored by MS shooters and an entry level BR50 rifle as I recollect.
Peter


Be without fear in the face of your enemies. Be brave and upright, that God may love thee. Speak the truth always, even if it leads to your death. Safeguard the helpless and do no wrong;
 
Posts: 10478 | Location: Jacksonville, Florida | Registered: 09 January 2004Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I mean around a 6lbs barrel.
 
Posts: 11651 | Location: Montreal | Registered: 07 November 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
It typically takes firing several dozen rounds to restore the accuracy of a good Rimfire barrel after it has been "cleaned". "Clean" it enough and you can prevent good accuracy entirely in the future.
 
Posts: 12967 | Location: Henly, TX, USA | Registered: 04 April 2001Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
if I ever wear out my CZ


If you keep cleaning it, which is totally unnecessary for the level of accuracy you need (off hand at 100 yds), that will happen much sooner than it would in the normal course of events.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I normally use a boresnake every 6th year.


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 39813 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Peter:
Depends on the firearm and your accuracy standards. The bullseye and B/R shooters that I know NEVER use a brush. They use a patch soaked in solvent and pull it through (breech to bore) with a "string" for want of a better term.
Peter

No even a nylon bore brush~????
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
Damn it~! How can I post an image~??? The site asks me for a URL, but the photo doesn't have a URL~!!
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
Picture of Steve E.
posted Hide Post
Upload it to some place like Imgur (it's free) and then go from there, it's super easy.

I usually just run a bore snake through mine about once a year and then wipe down the outside.

Steve.......


NRA Patron Life Member
North American Hunting Club Life Member
USAF Veteran
 
Posts: 1772 | Location: Southwest Mo | Registered: 31 May 2002Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Atkinson:
I normally use a boresnake every 6th year.
A man who thinks like I do, and I have some pretty darned accurate .22s in long guns and handguns. Currently shooting my newly acquired 1885 Winchester made by Miroku. Amazing little gun~!
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
[QUOTE]Originally posted by dwcars:
[url=https://imgur.com/MZmEfoI]https://imgur.c
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:

See image URL next message.
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I don’t shoot a 22 rim fire much. Last time I cleaned the bore on any of them was in the 1960s. They’re Volquartsen, Anschutz and Remington. They’re very accurate


NRA Patron member
 
Posts: 2534 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 08 December 2006Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Atkinson:
I normally use a boresnake every 6th year.

I'm now using bore-snakes for several calibers. I think they do a really great job and eliminate all those messy patches and drippy solvents. Very effective tool. Kudos to the people who invented it.
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
I think it depends on what kind of .22 you are talking about. Handguns will build up lead and revolvers are the worst. Once lead starts to build up it only gets worse and has to be removed. The ammunition also makes a difference. Some of the stuff that is out there these days is really dirty. If I see lead build-up in a barrel with the bore scope I don't stop cleaning until it is gone.
C.G.B.
 
Posts: 1030 | Registered: 25 January 2005Reply With Quote
one of us
posted Hide Post
quote:
http://www.rrdvegas.com/rimfire-cleaning.html

Regarding the older.22 rifles, I've found two problems.
1) carbon. If carbon deposits are left for a very long time, they become very difficult to remove. I plug the barrel and fill the bore with "Kreen" and let it soak overnight. A bronze brush will generally remove the softened carbon the first try. If it doesn't, repeat.
2) lead. Lead deposits are tough and can make the bore look like it's badly corroded. Using the same procedure as referred to with "Kreen", use "Kroil"and after allowing to soak overnight, scrub with a bronze brush or a worn out .20 cal brush wrapped with bronze wool for a tight fit and scrub like the devil. As the lead is removed from the grooves, the bore will look better and better.
My 1890 made in 1924 had a bore that appeared quite rough and corroded. After the above procedure with the carbon and lead mostly gone, the bore looks VERY satisfactory with grooves that are deep and lands that look quite sharp. From now on a bore snake will 'take care of business'~!
 
Posts: 230 | Location: florida | Registered: 20 April 2012Reply With Quote
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright December 1997-2022 Accuratereloading.com


Visit our on-line store for AR Memorabilia