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Who is your favorite wildlife artist?

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27 August 2014, 04:58
jdollar
Who is your favorite wildlife artist?
quote:
Originally posted by Lizzy:
Anyone who knows elephants cannot be afraid of them. They are very intelligent and are only dangerous if one cross their boundary.
The painting is great but it is set in 1930.
If you want to live dangerous, join the army and hunt down terrorists in the Middle East, ISIS for instance. That is dangerous.

anyone who doesn't have some degree of fear around elephants is an idiot-or has never been up close and personal. what difference does the setting date make??? when months passed and you seemed to have disappeared, no one grieved. now we once again have to put up with your stupid, uninformed comments. barf
27 August 2014, 13:15
Lizzy
Respect for animals, special for elephants, is different then fear. Never heard of Sharon Pincott or Iain Douglas Hamilton or Daphne Sheldrick or Dr Cynthia Moss? All have studied elephants in the wild between 14 and 40 years.

http://www.elephantectivism.or...-sharon-pincott.html

Cynthia Moss

"Our research which records the births and deaths of all elephants is a particularly sensitive barometer and alerted the world to what is happening with poaching. We reached a tipping point in 2009 where deaths outnumbered births."
- Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/

Just do a bit of research before judging me, I would say. Poaching or hunting for ivory is the same. The elephants are being killed for their ivory and the big tuskers are taken out of the Gene pool.

By the way, none of these researchers are armed and they are very close to wild elephants.
27 August 2014, 15:59
shootaway
quote:
Originally posted by Lizzy:
Respect for animals, special for elephants, is different then fear. Never heard of Sharon Pincott or Iain Douglas Hamilton or Daphne Sheldrick or Dr Cynthia Moss? All have studied elephants in the wild between 14 and 40 years.

http://www.elephantectivism.or...-sharon-pincott.html

Cynthia Moss

"Our research which records the births and deaths of all elephants is a particularly sensitive barometer and alerted the world to what is happening with poaching. We reached a tipping point in 2009 where deaths outnumbered births."
- Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton

http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/

Just do a bit of research before judging me, I would say. Poaching or hunting for ivory is the same. The elephants are being killed for their ivory and the big tuskers are taken out of the Gene pool.

By the way, none of these researchers are armed and they are very close to wild elephants.

If you want to discuss such matters why don't you start a thread of your own? It seems that you are the one who has started this unwelcome controversy here.
12 September 2014, 08:12
lavaca
Mike:

That's a great story.

Lizzy, I totally agree that there is a huge difference between respect and fear. But I do have a question. How close have you actually been to elephants, bulls or cows, in a wild, uncontrolled environment? (not a park)
23 September 2014, 07:00
Marp
quote:
Originally posted by Lizzy:
Anyone who knows elephants cannot be afraid of them. They are very intelligent and are only dangerous if one cross their boundary.
The painting is great but it is set in 1930.
If you want to live dangerous, join the army and hunt down terrorists in the Middle East, ISIS for instance. That is dangerous.


People cross elephant's boundaries, and vice versa, frequently. Mommas with babies can kill quickly. Crop raider eles that have had dealings with villagers trying to protect their crops can become lethal to anyone they find. Certain male eles which have lacked sufficient adult male ele contact can become murderers of not only people but rhinos too. Some males become homicidal when in musth. An ele in pain from any reason can be angry at the world.

The eles in the protected compounds/parks that have been befriended for their whole lives by people in vehicles can and do become pets/friends to the caretakers. That is not a natural situation.


Angry adult eles scare EVERYBODY and every mammal who happens to be in the vicinity. Sometimes we know what caused the anger, sometimes we don't.
28 November 2014, 06:06
TWall
Thomas Quinn is one of my favorites.

Tom
28 November 2014, 07:38
Big Wonderful Wyoming
I like 3-D art, so I am a fan of that guy in Cranbrook, BC. Rick Taylor is his name.
02 December 2014, 09:05
twilli
Chet Reneson and his watercolors.
02 December 2014, 09:28
DLS
Eric Forlee is a favorite. I was fortunate to purchase a pair of his oils when he first came to America and was living in a farmhouse of a friend who had sponsored him getting over here.
Also, really like David Shepard.

Never was a fan of Gary Swanson, especially after his PH pushed us off a good lion in Botswana so that he could bring Gary in to shoot it, which he did the day after we got kicked out of c

Of the bird painters, Harry Adamson will always be my favorite. Also like Chet Reneson.
02 December 2014, 18:54
MJines
quote:
Originally posted by twilli:
Chet Reneson and his watercolors.


When I think watercolor, I think of Bodo Meier.


Mike
04 December 2014, 01:19
Richard T. Cheatham
I would add Kobus Moller, a fine gentleman and extremely talented artist, to the list mentioned so far.

I second (third, fourth) David Shepherd (I'm the current steward of the David Shepherd painting pictured in Lizzy's post), Jan Martin McGuire, Peter Stewart, Joshua Spies, and John Banovich.


Richard T. Cheatham
15 February 2015, 19:58
Lawdwaz
Thomas Aquinas Daly is a real good friend of mine and a pretty fair artist!
19 February 2015, 07:37
zimbabwe
I only own one Africa picture and it's 'Distant Movement' framed nicely by Jon Banovich. He is to me the consummate African artist. This is a print he did for the NRA chapter fundraisers. It's easy for me to believe this is a photo of two Lions I have seen on several occaissons.


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DRSS
14 March 2015, 16:50
farbedo
For sculpture I have always admired the late Joe Halko's work.

For paintings, I don't think I could pick one.

For photography, again tough to chose, maybe Rob Nunnington.

Jeremy
15 April 2015, 07:57
Dave Hagstrom
For African wildlife....I like Kobus Moller
03 May 2015, 04:15
lavaca
The illustrators strive to make their paintings as realistic as a photo--in some cases every hair or feather is drawn. Carl Brenders is a good example. The painters paint with a broad brush and from a distance the result looks realistic but close up the brush strokes are obvious and no hairs or feathers are evident. The painters' work more closely meets the definition of "fine art." And it is much, much harder to paint than it is to illustrate.

I like both, but don't necessarily agree that being an "illustrator" is easier.

No offense to anyone not mentioned. I like Banovich and Abbey Walmsley. Wish I had bought her original of the lioness chasing the kudu calf.

I also like Peter Blackwell, especially his birds and small animals. He has a painting of mongoose that just shows the character of a mongoose. Wish I'd have bought that one too.
29 June 2015, 06:11
nhoro
For me it is David Langmead. If I were trying to convey an experience through a painting, I would use David's style. His use of light and vivid colors seem to portray a "better than reality" snapshot of African wildlife. His paintings are more about the experience and memory than the actual animal. Delta Traffic, Pools of Paradise and Blaze of Glory all speak to me based on experiences with my sons.

I am also a fan of Brita Harland, Richard's wife, for a completely different reason. I had my youngest son read Richard's book Ndlovu prior to his first elephant safari. After taking his elephant, we were surprised to hear Richard was at one of the other camps. Long story short, it was arranged for him to spend a day fishing on the Zambezi River with us. When we picked him up, he mentioned he had brought some of Brita's original oil paintings. I bought the 2 elephant paintings, which could be displayed separately, but belonged together. The paintings are beautiful, and the memories of our very special safari come rushing back each time I look at them.


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Already I was beginning to fall into the African way of thinking: That if
you properly respect what you are after, and shoot it cleanly and on
the animal's terrain, if you imprison in your mind all the wonder of the
day from sky to smell to breeze to flowers—then you have not merely
killed an animal. You have lent immortality to a beast you have killed
because you loved him and wanted him forever so that you could always
recapture the day - Robert Ruark

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05 July 2015, 14:31
DB Bill
If someone ask me if I could have a painting by anyone (dead or alive) it would take about two seconds to say "something from Bob Kuhn".

I grew up reading the hunting magazines with stories by O'Connor, Page, Keith (and I'll even mention the biggest AH I ever met Askins Jr but before I read anything I always devoured the covers and if Dad hadn't bought the latest one I'd spend my meger allowance if Kuhn had the cover.

Many wildlife artist are very very good - the subjects are techimally accurate and beautiful to look at but - againn for me - when you look at ine of Kuhn's art you aren't just an distant observer but rather standing just behind Bob as captures the moment.

My two favorites are fairly upland scenes - a hunter with a springer trying ot get peasants to in corn field and the second is a hunter watching his beagle trying to head off a rabbit before it makes his escape into a hollow log and with some slight changes in composition these twi scents wukk be engraved on the sides of my old 20ga Model 12 which has brought back to specs with some new exhibition-grade wood, a new venilated rib.

My Dad who passed several years ago will be the model for the rabbit hunter and the engraver will use a hunting photo of me when I was in my 20's for the scene in the cornfield. I was hoping it might be done by Christmas but the engraver is doing something similar with a pair of Model 42's I had restored for my two son's - and although the scenes will be different the engraver wil be using old photos to make them unique.

I'll post photos when we get them/


DB Bill aka Bill George
06 July 2015, 00:14
Lizzy
quote:
Originally posted by lavaca:
Mike:

That's a great story.

Lizzy, I totally agree that there is a huge difference between respect and fear. But I do have a question. How close have you actually been to elephants, bulls or cows, in a wild, uncontrolled environment? (not a park)


Sorry for my late reply. Many things happened. But I just came back from Zimbabwe and saw a herd of 60+ elephants at this waterhole. The hide was close and it was very interesting to watch the elephants at 2 meters distance In 1980 I was very close to a young bull elephant, about 3 meters distance and he was curious and came closer. I backed off and he walked off. This was at Mana Pools, a wild place, but no hunting allowed. Surely in hunting areas, all animals are weary of humans!

The Great White Shark is dangerous....but they don't eat people. Only 5 deadly encounters a year, worldwide....and people free dive with the Great White and even hold on to their fins for a ride. But again they are in danger of extinction because mankind hunts them for pleasure.
06 July 2015, 00:44
Lizzy
My favorite artist is Larry Norton from Zimbabwe.
Bought 3 prints on canvas in Victoria Falls from him. 2 Lions at sunset, 1 bull elephant and 1 Leopard in a tree watching the vlei.
http://www.larrynorton.co.za/Original%20Art.html
11 July 2015, 19:12
vapodog
quote:
If someone ask me if I could have a painting by anyone (dead or alive) it would take about two seconds to say "something from Bob Kuhn".

or maybe something from Terry Redlin?


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31 July 2015, 14:48
BNagel
quote:
Originally posted by lavaca:
The illustrators strive to make their paintings as realistic as a photo--in some cases every hair or feather is drawn. Carl Brenders is a good example. The painters paint with a broad brush and from a distance the result looks realistic but close up the brush strokes are obvious and no hairs or feathers are evident. The painters' work more closely meets the definition of "fine art." And it is much, much harder to paint than it is to illustrate.

I like both, but don't necessarily agree that being an "illustrator" is easier.

No offense to anyone not mentioned. I like Banovich and Abbey Walmsley. Wish I had bought her original of the lioness chasing the kudu calf.

I also like Peter Blackwell, especially his birds and small animals. He has a painting of mongoose that just shows the character of a mongoose. Wish I'd have bought that one too.


"Fierce Pursuit" available as a print (so I got one).


_______________________


02 August 2015, 21:49
wistrapper
Anything Tom Mansanarez. I especially adore his hound prints, Mountain Fury being my favorite.


**************************The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first.
07 August 2015, 19:55
fujotupu
Lizzie:

quote:
Poaching or hunting for ivory is the same.


Not really, as one is the indiscriminate killing regardless of its size, sex or weight of the ivory for commercial gain (illegal of course).

Hunting (from the sporting perspective)is the killing of the animal through a legal and selective process which may be determined by different factors:
a problem animal(PAC), part of a quota established for village rations, general cull to maintain numbers in a certain area, the elimination of an excess (established number) of young bulls that create a disturbance to more suitable adult candidates in a breeding herd and finally the old bull which is likely past breeding age.

Not all the ivory obtained from these hunts is exportable and that which is, cannot be sold and therefore a misconstrued idea by saying that it fuels the ivory trade and proportionately infinitesimal to the numbers poached and to state that hunting (legal) is part of the cause for the dwindling numbers in the elephant population is balderdash.

The Sheldrick Wildlife Trust was established to save what little is left of Kenya's elephants which have been massacred by poachers, NOT by legal hunters.The elephant population was virtually exterminated during the years following the hunting ban (figure that one out)and is STILL continuing.

Back to the original topic: Michael Ghaui has a pretty good eye and hand.

www.theexplora.com/michael-a-ghaui-painter-sculptor/
11 August 2015, 23:30
SingleShotGuy
I'm a big fan of Mule deer paintings and prints..........Leon Parson is pretty hard to beat.
23 August 2015, 08:12
TREE 'EM
Joe Goodman for furbearers and NA game.
Johnny Thorpe for carvings and totems.
Not mainstream artists but they bring a lot of personal flair to what they do.
Frace caught my attention 30 or so years ago and still holds it.


All We Know Is All We Are
23 August 2015, 08:28
Grenadier
Larry Duke. The action is amazing. He did the Remington Bullet Knife posters.

http://www.remington.com/pages...seum/larry-duke.aspx

These are a couple of my favorites:









.
23 August 2015, 09:27
DCS Member
quote:
Originally posted by Grenadier:
Larry Duke. The action is amazing. He did the Remington Bullet Knife posters.

http://www.remington.com/pages...seum/larry-duke.aspx

These are a couple of my favorites:






Almost reminds me of the old Tony Lama boot posters.


I meant to be DSC Member...bad typing skills.

Marcus Cady

DRSS
29 August 2015, 06:00
ted thorn
I have a couple nice fish prints by Al Agnew that I enjoy


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10 November 2015, 03:17
richj
Does this count. Bev Doolittle . You have to be careful a few times I've seen her books cut up and the pictures framed for sale.


11 December 2015, 14:55
Dom
Lot of good wildlife artists. Good post to find out some new artists. Also depends on what style and type one finds pleasing to the eye.

Also rated as a great wildlife artist is Rien Poortvliet.


-------- There are those who only reload so they can shoot, and then there are those who only shoot so they can reload. I belong to the first group. Dom ---------
12 December 2015, 14:57
Tim Vining
Boy this is an topic similar to what rifle is the best. I have several paintings by a young man named Ryan Perry that are excellent along with a few pieces by Linda Beezey. A lot of fine folks are mentioned and my hat is off to all of them.


Tim

29 December 2015, 03:16
Nyalubwe
Theres a good new one that was just featured in the latest issue of Sporting Classics- Julie Chapman.Check it out or go to her website by googling her. I think you'll like what you see.
30 December 2015, 08:51
Adventure907
My favorite wildlife artist is Alaskan Bronze Sculptor, Frank Entsminger. He's bronzes are simply amazing. His attention to detail is something I've yet to see in other bronze work.
31 December 2015, 20:52
bobby7321
Lately I've really been liking this artist Teshia

http://www.teshiaart.com/portfolio/


01 January 2016, 04:37
jdollar
To each his own.......
25 January 2016, 04:45
RIP
quote:
Originally posted by jdollar:
To each his own.......


Yep, and I would like that Teshia moose better if it was done on black velvet, with Elvis riding on its back, and if both Elvis and the moose were smoking cigars ... cigar smoke can be so dramatic on black velvet. Wink

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27 January 2016, 22:28
Nitro Express
Photo added--see below--

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Lynn Bogue Hunt.

He illustrated hunting and fishing magazine covers, created ammunition advertisement posters, and painted pictures of just about every game bird, animal or fish there is.

He died in 1960, so I guess most people haven't seen his work lately.

I have two of his prints, one of ducks and the other with quail. I'll see if I can get a decent scan and post it here.

A number of those metal ammunition and firearms advertisements from the 1920s-1950s that are now available as reproductions were done by Hunt.

Here's a photo of a reproduction of a tin advertisement sign Hunt produced. It's a little faded from hanging out in a barn for some years, but maybe it will give an idea of his talent.

[URL=


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27 January 2016, 23:10
shootaway
quote:
Originally posted by Nitro Express:
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Lynn Bogue Hunt.

He illustrated hunting and fishing magazine covers, created ammunition advertisement posters, and painted pictures of just about every game bird, animal or fish there is.

He died in 1960, so I guess most people haven't seen his work lately.

I have two of his prints, one of ducks and the other with quail. I'll see if I can get a decent scan and post it here.

A number of those metal ammunition and firearms advertisements from the 1920s-1950s that are now available as reproductions were done by Hunt.

I saw some images of his work on google images.Imagine the hunting that could be done back then-1920's, how much wilderness there was and what Bogue's eyes saw!
30 January 2016, 06:34
OTTOMATIC
Alberto Vargas
http://www.thepinupfiles.com/vargas1.html


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