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I have a pretty large piece-2.5"x12"x40". Is there a market for it? I don't know why I acquired it as I have no use for it.
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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What color?
 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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An ugly green.
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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Picture of Grenadier
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Green Micarta was made famous by Randall knives, especially for use on "combat" knives.





.
 
Posts: 10899 | Location: North of the Columbia | Registered: 28 April 2008Reply With Quote
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that ugly green is popular among some folks.

Check the knifemakers / folder forum on baldeforums.

http://www.bladeforums.com/

Todd Davison just sold one.

http://www.bladeforums.com/for...Green-Canvas-Micarta
 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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2.5 inches thick is pretty thick for knife scales. One could probably divide that in half.

I'd see if I could find a knifemaker who would take it in partial trade toward a custom knife.
 
Posts: 2059 | Location: Mpls., MN | Registered: 28 June 2014Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by lindy2:
2.5 inches thick is pretty thick for knife scales. One could probably divide that in half.

I'd see if I could find a knifemaker who would take it in partial trade toward a custom knife.


Lindy,
That would be a good idea. I measured it to see if I guessed right. It is actually 2.5"X8.5"X48".
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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that's a lot of handles. I count 36 pairs
 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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I guess the first question I'd ask is what is it made from? Paper, canvas or linen? We use the term micarta kind of like we use the term Kleenex to include all phenolic laminates. Micarta is however a registed trademark of Norplex-Micarta.


Dave

In 100 years who of us will care?
An armed society is a polite society!
Just because they say you are paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.
 
Posts: 899 | Location: Ammon, NC | Registered: 31 December 2013Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by drhall762:
I guess the first question I'd ask is what is it made from? Paper, canvas or linen? We use the term micarta kind of like we use the term Kleenex to include all phenolic laminates. Micarta is however a registed trademark of Norplex-Micarta.



I wouldn't have a clue and wouldn't know how to tell.
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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Sometimes it is pretty evident from a visual inspection. The paper is what is often used when there is a desire to have a "no grain effect." It can be shined up. The lines of course uses linen as the material and usually has a very "fine grained" look to it. It can also be shined but does show fine grain similar to a dense fine grained wood. The canvas has a more textured look and feel to it. It can be shined as well but is often just buffed or left rough for better grip.

Cost for the same sized pieces run in that same order with paper the highest, linen the next highest and very close and lastly canvas at about half the cost of linens or even a little less.

Hope this helps.


Dave

In 100 years who of us will care?
An armed society is a polite society!
Just because they say you are paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.
 
Posts: 899 | Location: Ammon, NC | Registered: 31 December 2013Reply With Quote
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I think this is natural canvas and white linen.



grain

 
Posts: 5714 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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I guess that I need to post a photo. Mine doesn't look like that.
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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Butch:

Did you ever sell it?

I accidentally ran on this post while reading on Blade Forums. Seems that there are only 2 REAL Micartas, because the name is trademarked. The original maker, Westinghouse, whose product is held in very high regard, and the company that then bought the name, Norplex, whose product, at least some of which is imported, is not so widely respected. So, technically much of what is called Micarta these days is probably not. This post is by a widely respected knifemaker:

quote:
I use a lot of micarta materials (over 1,000 pounds per year) and have for a long time and would like to weigh in here on the "Micarta" name issue.

Westinghouse made and sold some of the best reinforced phenolic and knife makers such as Bob Loveless popularized its use on knife handles, so the knife buying public is familiar with the term "Micarta", but might not know what a person is talking about if they hear "laminated phenolic and fiber composite". It just doesn't have the same "ring" to it.

I remember about ten years ago when industry made the change. From my point of view it was actually pretty terrible. I didn't change my orders with my material suppliers, but the material changed with the end result being some pretty major problems with the work I was producing at the time requiring significant re-work, replacements and some non-trivial losses. The new Micarta was not a quality material. It turns out that Norplex bought the name from Westinghouse and applied it to cheap import junk material which lacked the dimensional stability and quality of the original. Import material labeled "Micarta" because they'd bought a name.

It's my understanding that Norplex does make some good materials, but much of it isn't, and that name doesn't mean anything anymore.

In my opinion, the best phenolic is manufactured in Yonkers New York by Accurate and is called Acculam. To me it's the closest to the original material that I've found.

There are some important issues with the quality of the raw material that I've found:
1: The extent to which the fiber is impregnated with phenolic. Some materials are incomplete causing issues with dimensional changes from moisture absorption and problems getting a clean buff and a smooth finish.
2: The amount of filler used vs virgin resin. There can be so much regrind and filler added (to reduce cost) the amount of virgin phenolic resin is not the major percentage of the weight of the final product. This results in a weak crumbly material with soft spots that doesn't polish evenly and breaks or crack when dropped.
3: The quality of the workmanship concerning distribution of fiber and flatness of finished sheet.
4: There are probably differences in the quality of the base resins and cotton products also.

The end results being quite a bit of variation across the brands and grades ranging from the original Westinghouse Micarta that is hard, machines smooth, and is durable and stable and attractive, to low quality import materials that swell in water, won't lay flat, have a chalky quality and get dirty and uneven when buffed and crush or crack when a screw is run tight on it. Makers need to know what they're working with and avoid low quality materials or the quality of their knives will suffer. Why try to save two dollars on the cost of the material? That's all it is and it's foolish.

So, I describe the Acculam phenolic I use as micarta because my customers know what micarta is and would be confused by "laminated phenolic and fiber composite". It's straightforward and simple word that people understand. And I don't feel it's being disingenuous because it's closer to Westinghouse Micarta than most of the Norplex stuff is. That's a lower case "micarta". Times when I use Westinghouse Micarta that's capitalized Micarta, a proper noun. I understand that Norplex owns the trademark now and can legally call anything they want "Micarta", but to me that's getting into word games. Polyamide is Nylon, polyoxymethylene is acetal is Delrin, and reinforced phenolic is micarta, we all know what it means.

The take-away here is, call it what you want, but be aware it is all the same thing, but it isn't all the same quality and that brand name doesn't mean what it used to mean. Personally, having been burned, I try to stay away from Norplex products.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Gatogordo:
Butch:

Did you ever sell it?

I accidentally ran on this post while reading on Blade Forums. Seems that there are only 2 REAL Micartas, because the name is trademarked. The original maker, Westinghouse, whose product is held in very high regard, and the company that then bought the name, Norplex, whose product, at least some of which is imported, is not so widely respected. So, technically much of what is called Micarta these days is probably not. This post is by a widely respected knifemaker:

quote:
I use a lot of micarta materials (over 1,000 pounds per year) and have for a long time and would like to weigh in here on the "Micarta" name issue.

Westinghouse made and sold some of the best reinforced phenolic and knife makers such as Bob Loveless popularized its use on knife handles, so the knife buying public is familiar with the term "Micarta", but might not know what a person is talking about if they hear "laminated phenolic and fiber composite". It just doesn't have the same "ring" to it.

I remember about ten years ago when industry made the change. From my point of view it was actually pretty terrible. I didn't change my orders with my material suppliers, but the material changed with the end result being some pretty major problems with the work I was producing at the time requiring significant re-work, replacements and some non-trivial losses. The new Micarta was not a quality material. It turns out that Norplex bought the name from Westinghouse and applied it to cheap import junk material which lacked the dimensional stability and quality of the original. Import material labeled "Micarta" because they'd bought a name.

It's my understanding that Norplex does make some good materials, but much of it isn't, and that name doesn't mean anything anymore.

In my opinion, the best phenolic is manufactured in Yonkers New York by Accurate and is called Acculam. To me it's the closest to the original material that I've found.

There are some important issues with the quality of the raw material that I've found:
1: The extent to which the fiber is impregnated with phenolic. Some materials are incomplete causing issues with dimensional changes from moisture absorption and problems getting a clean buff and a smooth finish.
2: The amount of filler used vs virgin resin. There can be so much regrind and filler added (to reduce cost) the amount of virgin phenolic resin is not the major percentage of the weight of the final product. This results in a weak crumbly material with soft spots that doesn't polish evenly and breaks or crack when dropped.
3: The quality of the workmanship concerning distribution of fiber and flatness of finished sheet.
4: There are probably differences in the quality of the base resins and cotton products also.

The end results being quite a bit of variation across the brands and grades ranging from the original Westinghouse Micarta that is hard, machines smooth, and is durable and stable and attractive, to low quality import materials that swell in water, won't lay flat, have a chalky quality and get dirty and uneven when buffed and crush or crack when a screw is run tight on it. Makers need to know what they're working with and avoid low quality materials or the quality of their knives will suffer. Why try to save two dollars on the cost of the material? That's all it is and it's foolish.

So, I describe the Acculam phenolic I use as micarta because my customers know what micarta is and would be confused by "laminated phenolic and fiber composite". It's straightforward and simple word that people understand. And I don't feel it's being disingenuous because it's closer to Westinghouse Micarta than most of the Norplex stuff is. That's a lower case "micarta". Times when I use Westinghouse Micarta that's capitalized Micarta, a proper noun. I understand that Norplex owns the trademark now and can legally call anything they want "Micarta", but to me that's getting into word games. Polyamide is Nylon, polyoxymethylene is acetal is Delrin, and reinforced phenolic is micarta, we all know what it means.

The take-away here is, call it what you want, but be aware it is all the same thing, but it isn't all the same quality and that brand name doesn't mean what it used to mean. Personally, having been burned, I try to stay away from Norplex products.


No, I haven't even tried. It just sits in the corner with my metal supply.
 
Posts: 8924 | Location: Poetry, Texas | Registered: 28 November 2004Reply With Quote
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Digging into pricing, IF that piece is a "good" piece, whatever that might be, it would be damn expensive to buy new.


xxxxxxxxxx
When considering US based operations of guides/outfitters, check and see if they are NRA members. If not, why support someone who doesn't support us? Consider spending your money elsewhere.

NEVER, EVER book a hunt with BLAIR WORLDWIDE HUNTING or JEFF BLAIR.

I have come to understand that in hunting, the goal is not the goal but the process.
 
Posts: 17099 | Location: Texas USA | Registered: 07 May 2001Reply With Quote
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Just sell it on www.bladeforums.com
 
Posts: 7636 | Registered: 10 October 2002Reply With Quote
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