THE ACCURATE RELOADING POLITICAL CRATER

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Climate Change Denialism Just Got a Lot Harder Login/Join 
one of us
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quote:
the beetle-kill trees


That is from the stand getting old. and the climate shift helped to make it get old quicker//

We see it with timber here.But the CO2 has nothing to do with shifting the oceans climate......

Only Co2 involvement is helping to make trees grow faster and be the other help. getting the stand get older quicker...

What to do is not the carbon tax, warming crap, AGW scam , but clean it up.Make lumber from the good, make biomass for mulch

to replant new, as well use rest of biomass for energy, from the bad. We need huge public works

and millions working on this. .....Well managed forests are as much a part of a good infrastructure as

well managed --roads, bridges, parks, flood control, all public facilities.....


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
That is from the stand getting old



BS.

No, something else happened, and is happening. The scale is too vast, and the die-off was complete, no discrimination as to age of the tree. I was shocked to see it in Jasper National park - the vastness of it.

Those Canadians are particular, (and IMO peculiar) and despite the inevitability and no-stopping it, they don't allow the transport of firewood from one park to another, supposedly to stop the spread of the beetles.

One side benefit is that the free firewood bins at the provincial parks has a plentiful supply of nice dry firewood for the patrons to enjoy - all from culling the dead and dying trees close by.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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It is still from the stand getting old,

the tree in the stand that is bigger and looks older, gets dead limbs first,

or the weaker trees, dead limbs first. etc,

is more susceptable to beetles and once it gets it, the beetle population has a start,

a place closer to the rest of the trees, to multiply and numbers explode,

it passes beetles onto the rest of the stand in short time..

It can be stopped but the greedy inflation makes the costs per acre more

than the land costs...


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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It ain't the dead limbs I'm talking about. It's the whole phucking tree; the whole phucking forest of conifers, vast areas as the beetles spread. The aspen and birch for example prosper with the open canopy.

Gawd, I can hardly believe how dense you are.

And, no, it can't be stopped. It's totally impractical, financially and physically. It's implausible.

After all, it is nature taking it's course, given what the conditions are - warming, which somehow favors the beetle that kills the conifers or evergreens.

Oh well, I like aspen and birch.

In the south, we have other deciduous trees, and I like them too. I live on a place surrounded by pines, and the beetles are working on them, steadily.

Loggers are supposed to show up today, and we plan on cutting the whole stand before the beetles get them all. I'm going to partially re-plant pines, maybe long-leaf, and the rest will be oaks, persimmon, crabapple, etc.

I'll miss the mature pines, though. The doves and the owls and the fox squirrel, for example, love to nest in them. And, I like to hear the wind blowing through them.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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I use term 'dead limbs' as a means

to see what tree trees are becoming susceptable first.

Your the dummy with with your agw stupid crap.

I was in the forestry and logging business...When stands get to certain age

they need work. Species that are suitable for thinning , thin them,

those types that need clear cut , clear cut.

And I don't like letting nature take its course, God put us here to manage things

not let them go to hell. We need work for people , put them to work..by the millions...


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Grandpasez:


I was in the forestry and logging business...When stands get to certain age

And I don't like letting nature take its course, God put us here to manage things

not let them go to hell. We need work for people , put them to work..by the millions...

Species that are suitable for thinning , thin them,



Well, an X-logger; that explains a lot.

Nature will take it's course. It's kinda like reality - resistance is futile.

Species ARE being thinned, flora and fauna, by nature. Maybe, soon, it's our turn.

Millions rapeing the environment - well that's what we have now.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Baloney . We need to put enough people out there to clean forests so it doesn't burn.

Thinning, harvesting , select cut, etc before any gets rotten or bug damaged..

When stands need thinning do that, clear cut do that. we need constant forestry

management. harvesting , replanting. And stop God damn, trade wars so we can sell the

stuff to parts of the world that needs it.

It should be the biggest manpower industry in this country. Even if it has to be a

govt deal like defense. Letting nature take its course like described is a crime against humanity..

We don't have our nation living like wild animals foraging for food, eating bark, chewing grass, etc,

we have organized farming and food production....... Well a properly run society does the

same for all its forests and barren areas that need greening, also....WE need to be Taking care of,

replanting ,running tree nurseries, plus harvest and wood products production.etc....

And if we let in those to replace the 120 million plus, we should have,

And let in extra just because we have been a nation of pricks, and they along with our

young would supply the work force, as well as increase the building and demand for wood....


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Grandpasez:
Baloney . We need to put enough people out there to clean forests so it doesn't burn.

Thinning, harvesting , select cut, etc before any gets rotten or bug damaged..

When stands need thinning do that, clear cut do that. we need constant forestry

management. harvesting , replanting. And stop God damn, trade wars so we can sell the

stuff to parts of the world that needs it.

It should be the biggest manpower industry in this country. Even if it has to be a

govt deal like defense. Letting nature take its course like described is a crime against humanity..

We don't have our nation living like wild animals foraging for food, eating bark, chewing grass, etc,

we have organized farming and food production....... Well a properly run society does the

same for all its forests and barren areas that need greening, also....WE need to be Taking care of,

replanting ,running tree nurseries, plus harvest and wood products production.etc....

And if we let in those to replace the 120 million plus, we should have,

And let in extra just because we have been a nation of pricks, and they along with our

young would supply the work force, as well as increase the building and demand for wood....


Rake the forests? Seems like I've heard that before...
 
Posts: 5924 | Location: Tennessee | Registered: 09 December 2007Reply With Quote
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You clean the forests, and use it for mulch to make the right

soil for the tree nurseries, and to put around roots on new area planting

and greening up barren areas.Rest use for energy. Damn they are doing it

in China, and Asia, and they don't have the huge places needing work on,

like us and CAN, to get a huge supply of mulch, It only took 60 years to turn

our midwest into a desert like dust bowl..And we reclaimed it in a few years

planting windbreaks and shelter belts, crop rotation, etc.We are a can do nation,

if we get the leadership to do instead of squabbling..


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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Geez what a bunch of half-assed crap.
I get up-dates from the county forester on beetles, catipilars , blister rust and so on.
These are all non-native tree killers, introduced from Europe, china and elsewhere. All to do with trade, not climate change. Things like pine sawyer beetles. They look just like our native pine borer, except for two little white dots. Our native beetle bores only dead wood, the invasive, live wood, that kills the tree.
This info has been around for years, and you two old hens still cant get it right.
Hubels " hockey stick" is an actual graph he doesn't explain. That was the sudden almost straight up-tick in sea temps.
That all comes back to Thomas Karl, head of NOAA. and his new methods of measuring temps.
Science Tech out of the UK listened to John Bates that the info was flawed and manipulated.
In the end.
Karl was pulled up for an oversight hearing.
His method was found unreliable. Bates was right, the methods changed and Karl is gone.
But those graphs are still used and Karls published erroneous work still repeated.
As to why a scientist lied, he never answered that to the oversight board. But people are people, and somewhere he stood to gain from it is the best guess.
Climate change is used as a crutch all the time.
Our Maple syrup season was off 25-30% this year.
The news paper articles all said the dryer then normal summer last year impacted the sugar content of the sap. And that climate change was the culprit.
No mention that last year was the best season on record in the US and Canada, and prices dropped because of it. Not one word that climate changed helped.
There are plenty of records, both here in the US and Canada of syrup production. Every 6-8 years is an off year, this isn't even as bad as some of the others have been.
Instead of just leaving it as an off year. ( and the price is back up) someone always has to add in CLIMATE CHANGE into the headline.
Climate change is real, but leave it to where it really is. Using it as a crutch for everything just makes people mis-trust the findings.
Anyway. Kabob, neat project. I love projects like that. Your van must be about the size of those mini-winnabego's you see. Lots could be done starting from scratch, Look forward to seeing it.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by theback40:
Anyway. Kabob, neat project. I love projects like that. Your van must be about the size of those mini-winnabego's you see. Lots could be done starting from scratch, Look forward to seeing it.


Thanks for saying something nice, for a change, about my vehicles and projects, and travel wishes.

As for the rest of your misconceived story:

This article seems to require subscription so I'll post the whole thing, but if you can open it, there are some good references and associated links:

A tiny pest helped stoke this year’s devastating wildfires
It’s not just hot, dry conditions and fire suppression that has exacerbated 2020's western fires. There’s also the attack of the beetles to consider.

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 1, 2020

National Geographic

The photos and news from the past month’s devastating fires across parts of the West—charred towns, dramatic helicopter rescues, apocalyptic skies—have provoked fear, anger, and an understandable search for blame. It’s clear that fires are getting worse. But why? Scientists point to a number of reasons. Hotter and drier conditions brought on by climate change can prime vegetation to burn, and decades of fire suppression have allowed fuel to accumulate in forests. Millions of people now live closer to those dry forests than ever. And then there is the matter of the beetles.

There are 600 species of bark beetles in the United States, and they’ve evolved with their various host trees over millennia. Many bark beetles infest already dead or dying trees, but some, like the mountain pine beetle, attack living ones. The mountain pine beetle alone has killed roughly 100,000 square miles of trees across western North America over the past 20 years, from New Mexico all the way up to northern British Columbia. Climate change has instigated this dramatic spread, by eliminating the cold spells that kill off the beetles and by leaving the trees stressed by drought, unable to defend themselves.

(Read: Inside California's fight to contain its wildfires.)

The fear is that these enormous expanses of dead trees could, as a recent headline in the Los Angeles Times put it, “fuel unprecedented firestorms” across the West. In California’s Sierra Nevada this year, the fear seems to have been realized: The Creek Fire has so far burned more than 309,033 acres and destroyed 855 structures, and the U.S. Forest Service estimates that 80 to 90 percent of what’s burning is beetle-killed timber. During California’s crippling drought from 2012 to 2017, the Forest Service says, roughly 142 million trees died, mostly in low-elevation ponderosa-pine forests.

But while it may seem obvious that a hillside covered in dead trees is more likely to go up in a deadly blaze than a hillside covered in green, living trees, the connection between beetle-kill and wildfire seems to depend on the type of forest. “You can’t necessarily say that conclusions drawn from fires in California would apply to forests in the Rockies or the Pacific Northwest,” says Emily Francis, a postdoctoral researcher in forest ecology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her doctorate was on the impacts of extreme drought on California’s forests, and her field sites burned in both the CZU Lightning Complex and Creek fires this summer.

In some forests, beetle infestations don’t seem to make wildfires any worse—and might even limit their severity.

A matter of elevation
In a study published in 2018, a group of fire scientists led by Scott Stephens of the University of California at Berkeley more or less predicted what has happened this year in parts of the Sierra Nevada. In the southern and central Sierras, they warned, “the scale of present tree mortality is so large that greater potential for ‘mass fire’ exists in the coming decades, driven by the amount and continuity of dry, combustible, large woody material that could produce large, severe fires.”

“I am afraid it pretty much described what happened in the Creek Fire,” Stephens says now of that study.

Countdown to tree death—see how pine beetles do their damage.

For centuries the relationship was mutually beneficial: Pine beetles culled older, weaker trees, producing new beetles but also a healthier forest. Climate change, with its warmer, drier conditions, has upset that balance, leaving even healthy trees vulnerable to attack.

ONE WEEK

Selection and Invasion

The cycle begins in summer, when a lone female beetle bores into a tree’s bark and releases a pheromone that attracts hundreds of other beetles.
The tree tries to suffocate the insects by secreting resin into the beetles’ boreholes.

TWO WEEKS

Burrowing and Egg Laying

Beetles dig galleries under the bark, depositing eggs and blue fungi to feed the next generation. The galleries block nutrient flow in the tree’s phloem layer.

THREE WEEKS TO 4 MONTHS

Hatching and Feeding

Larvae hatch from eggs and chew side galleries, feeding on the phloem and the fungi.

The larvae develop cold resistance in time for winter.

The doomed tree remains green for months after beetles have fatally mauled it.

5 TO 12 MONTHS

Overwintering and Dispersal

The beetle larvae lie dormant until spring, when they’ll turn into pupae, then adults. The new brood feeds on fungal spores before dispersing to another tree.

Pupal stage

Fungi-carrying

new adult

Needles turn yellow in the dry heat of summer.

13 TO 24 MONTHS

Red Means Dead

The beetles are long gone, and the tree continues to dry and turns red. In its final stage the tree will lose most of its needles, becoming gray.

Satellite imagery generally shows the highest heat at the edge of a wildfire, where it moves into unburned areas. But during the first few days of the Creek Fire, the intensity deep inside the burning area was equal to that at the perimeter, Stephens says. “All that dead and downed material was burning and creating a signature equivalent to the flaming edge. We call that a mass fire.”

Lower-elevation ponderosa pine forests, like those in the Sierra Nevada, are especially vulnerable to this type of event because they evolved with frequent, low-intensity fires, burning every five to 25 years. Their natural state was open grass between widely spaced, large trees, so there was less to burn when fires came through. But a century of fire suppression by humans has filled the forests with fuel and more densely packed trees that would otherwise have been thinned out by the periodic fires. Competing for resources, the trees are stressed and more susceptible to beetle outbreaks—which makes the forest more prone to extreme blazes in hot, dry, windy weather.

In the lodgepole-pine forests typical of high elevations in the Rocky Mountains, on the other hand, the story is different. Those forests naturally burn only once every 75 to 300 years, in severe fire events. There, fire suppression hasn’t had much of an impact; whether the trees are alive or killed by beetles, plenty of fuel to burn has built up over time when a fire does come through.

The northern Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest are yet other entities. In interior forests, east of the Cascades, research has shown that beetle outbreaks don’t always impact the severity of fires, and in some cases may actually reduce it. That’s because in those forests, typical fire behavior involves so-called crown fires, which burn through the forest canopy. But following a beetle outbreak, the canopy fuels become much less abundant, as needles and branches fall off the dead trees. It can take a long time after an outbreak for those canopy fuels to come back to levels that are important for active crown fires.

On the west side of the Cascades, meanwhile, from northern Oregon through Washington, the forests naturally have extraordinarily high amounts of biomass—giant trees, and lots of them, thanks in part to lots of rain. The dominant trees here, such as Douglas firs, are also fast-growing and long-lived. These forests have historically burned very infrequently, with fires sometimes occurring hundreds of years apart. But when they do burn, they burn big.

“It has nothing to do with bark beetle outbreaks or unnaturally high fuel loads,” says Brian Harvey, a forest and fire ecologist at the University of Washington. What propels those fires, he says, is a combination of warm, dry conditions that dry out the trees and other plants, some form of “ignition on the landscape—human caused or lightning,” and east winds that can drive the fires to travel at extreme speeds.

In the forests of the Rockies and Pacific Northwest, this weather seems to be a far bigger driver of fire severity than beetles. When it’s hot and dry enough, whether the trees are alive or dead doesn’t “make a huge difference relative to how these fires would normally burn,” says Sarah Hart, a forest ecologist at the University of Wisconsin.

She has analyzed the relationships of hundreds of large wildfires to mountain pine beetle outbreaks in Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine forests. She and colleagues at the University of Colorado found that the area burned each year “has not increased in direct response to bark beetle activity.”

Zombie forests

What’s overwhelmingly clear is that climate change is having a large impact on wildfires, “driving not just the length of the fire season but changing the extremes,” says Chad Hoffman, co-director of the Western Forest Fire Research Center at Colorado State University. “It’s drier, warmer, and fuels can ignite more readily and spread faster.” Roughly 35 miles from CSU, the Cameron Peak Fire, the third largest in the state’s history, is still burning, having torched more than 124,000 acres since it began on August 13 and periodically raining ash on communities up and down Colorado’s Front Range.

What’s also clear is that forest management can help—but it needs to be context-specific. In California’s ponderosa forests, many scientists say that putting fire back on the landscape with prescribed burns is an effective way to create healthier forests—along with some logging to reduce their density. In Colorado’s lodgepole pine forests, though, removing beetle-killed timber or thinning out live trees does not make much sense since it has not been shown to impact severity or spread. In some Pacific Northwest forests, where beetle outbreaks may be buffering against more extreme fires, clearing dead trees could ultimately make the forests less resilient.

One silver lining of the widespread beetle-kill, says Jenny Briggs, an ecologist who has studied the interplay of beetles, fires, and forest management for the U.S. Geological Survey, could be that the visual shock of it could call attention to how “out of whack” some of our forest ecosystems have become. Because green forests look healthy, we can’t see that they’re actually suffering.

“Crowded, drought-stressed forests that are green just don't look as dangerous as crowded, drought-stressed forests that have a lot of red or gray or fallen dead trees,” Briggs says.

The dead forests could be a wake-up call, and indeed an awakening seems to be underway. Late last month, California signed a management agreement with the Forest Service that could significantly alter the state’s forests for decades. Under the plan, the Forest Service will thin a million acres of forest a year over the next five years, using a combination of logging, prescribed burns, and clearing brush. The aim is to treat 15 million acres of Californian forests, at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

As governments embark on that kind of investment, some scientists say it’s important to recognize that some forests now exist outside of their niche habitat. “Because trees are so long-lived, we will see trees persisting in places that no longer have forest climates,” says Chris Field, director of Stanford University’s Woods Institute of the Environment. “Many of the low-elevation forests in California are in that state.”

As those forests burn, the same forests may not replace them. Field works on something called the Zombie Forest Project, which looks at how catastrophic fires may alter ecosystems—and how better management and planning can help both nature and people.

“In a changing climate it’s not just about continuing to manage the risk of ignition. We also need to recognize that we are dealing with biome shifts that will occur through time,” he says.

====================================

Also:

https://thetruthmatters.compan...s-of-climate-change/

https://www.google.com/search?...a1BMsQ4dUDCAk&uact=5


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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I don't live in the west Kabob, so made no reference to it. The US is a big place, and is why you cant make sweeping policy in most cases.
So not sure what misconceived you are talking about.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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These are all non-native tree killers, introduced from Europe, china and elsewhere.



I was talking about vast beetle kill, in relation to climate change, and you made that comment. I considered it misinformation, at best.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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And I clearly said MY COUNTY FORRESTER
Pretty much means my section of the country doesn't it?
We have beetle kill here, and I explained where it came from.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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You made the claim that it's from invasive species, introduced, and originating from other countries.

Show me some source, with credibility, (not your shrink) that supports that claim, pertaining specifically to your locale.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Look up emerald ash borer, and pine sawyer.
Both invasives, both tree killers.
I'll be waiting for your, you were right.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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I found my forestry paper.
Emerald ash borer
Asian long horned beetle ( locally know as pine sawyer)
Gypsy moth catipilar
Winter moth catipilar
All kill trees, all invasives.
Unless Asian long horn means some part of the US is called Asia. Wink
You would do well to be more informed before spouting off Kabob.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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You would do well to be more informed before spouting off Kabob.


As you SHOULD be aware, "informed" is very important to me. I don't like misinformation, nor lies.

So, in that context, I'm open to being informed by real knowledge that you may present.

I'll research what you say, and get back with you.

It is telling, to me, that you spout stuff as fact, with zero backup.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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I am not a cut and paste master that you are.
This way, you can go right to dept of forestry, not some opinion piece like you post.
All you had to do was ask, "what beetles are the problem there" I would have gone and found the info on the spot.
Instead you turn into the same nasty Kabob who calls people a liar. You wanted respect, I told you, you would have it from me if you acted better.
It just seems impossible for you to be decent, and you whine when people say things about you and everyone thinks your an asshole.
Not to worry Kabob, I will point out and call out what a liar and dick you are if you want to still be that way. It didn't have to be so.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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All you had to do was ask, "what beetles are the problem there" I would have gone and found the info on the spot.


That's basically what I did, and we see your deflection.

All you needed to do was provide credible source, rather than opine.

SOP.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Magine,

It is not hard to find info from your local state forester on how bad the non native critters and plants are causing significant damage to our landscape. This is not climate change at all but is careless stupid shit done by humans.

I just said goodbye to all of the ash in my woodlands. Most were huge mature specimens. The next bug on the way will wipe out the Laurel family of plants which includes the sassafras trees on my land. Almost all of these things are Asiatic in origin. Direct imports from Chinese cargo. Some have been horribly advocated by conservation agencies in the past (autumn olive, multiflora rose, Sericea lespediza, various fescues, callery pear, etc). The list is huge as is the damage.


~Ann



 
Posts: 16674 | Location: The LOST Nation | Registered: 27 March 2001Reply With Quote
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Yes, Ann, I agree.

If TB40 had said it that way, I would have agreed with him too.

I realize there are species both native and invasive that are killing the trees.

My initial point was that climate change has contributed to the vast beetle kills across the west.

TB40 diverted that point, but the point is still valid.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Picture of Aspen Hill Adventures
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quote:
My initial point was that climate change has contributed to the vast beetle kills across the west.


This I disagree with. There are MANY factors which contribute to this, unrelated whatsoever to climate change. It's once again, human caused change. My top picks- Fire suppression, monoculture and the lack of reasonable resource/timber harvest.


~Ann



 
Posts: 16674 | Location: The LOST Nation | Registered: 27 March 2001Reply With Quote
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You did not basically ask, you switched to your narcissistic passive/aggressive nature. Because in your mind you know everything about everything.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Ann, add water to the list. People have diverted water/snow pack every place they can, to their own use. It puts a stress on the trees making them more prone to harm from everything else. Water is never a problem for us, it's the invasives that will do it here.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Aspen Hill Adventures:
quote:
My initial point was that climate change has contributed to the vast beetle kills across the west.


This I disagree with. There are MANY factors which contribute to this, unrelated whatsoever to climate change. It's once again, human caused change. My top picks- Fire suppression, monoculture and the lack of reasonable resource/timber harvest.


You are entitled to disagree, which obviously you deploy such entitlement liberally. Wink dancing

But, there are many who are quiet qualified in their opinions who say it's climate change, and the beetle spread/kill is facilitated and part of the evidence..

IMO, although the beetle kill is a problem, in the scope of man-made climate change, it's not the biggest problem. The trees will grow back, and may favor different species.

Norfolk navy base can just move. After all, who ever heard the navy Wink complain of more water?


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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I see Kabob has not got back to me, as he said he would.
I diverted the post?
Must be I should have posted pictures of my camper. - hypocrite.
Misconcieved information - lie
Says he admits when he's wrong and changes his mind, nope - narcissistic and cowardly behavior defines Kabob.
He is the TRUMP of AFPF.
Funny how no one comes to back you up Kabob.
I love to fight, and I never bluff.
If you want to act like a dick, I'll bring it every time.
Maybe you can get your own forum, THE KABOB FORUM. Just don't post unless you agree with me.
This doesn't have to be this way, the choice is yours how you act.
I stand by what I said before, you want to be respected, treat others with respect.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
I see Kabob has not got back to me, as he said he would.



Okay - here's getting back to you, since you don't yet apparently get it: moon rotflmo


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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A childish response when Kabob finds he's wrong.
And you still don't understand why you have no respect from people. Big Grin
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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So, you speak for "people"?

Your trash talk is all about you.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Your words Trumpbob.
You complain often about people not showing you respect in their replies to your posts.
Your going downhill every time you post.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Climate change, hahahahahahahahahahahHHahHHhA, to hell and back, haha!


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THANOS WAS RIGHT!
 
Posts: 9554 | Location: Montana | Registered: 25 June 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by theback40:
Your words Trumpbob.
You complain often about people not showing you respect in their replies to your posts.
Your going downhill every time you post.


Well, most people who disagree with me are not disrespectful. And I with them, or at least try to not be disrespectful.

You, OTOH, seem to not have such distinction or self-restraint, or will. So, you attack me personally, make all sorts of wild claims, completely outside the topic.

And you pretend that it's about respect. No, you stand alone in this regard. You do not represent anyone but yourself.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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You have only been attacked from me when you have done so first.
You were the one just a short time ago who wanted to call a truce. I agreed.
You didn't last long, you bring it onto yourself. All you had to do was just ask questions, not go straight to your nasty prick style.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
You have only been attacked from me when you have done so first.


BS and childish, and gaming blame shift.

Oh well, you have always been impossible. So what.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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And you were respectfull in your replies to Hubel? Liar.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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It becomes more difficult to be respectful to nutz, the more they spout. Sorry if I failed.

You, OTOH, ought to consider that I still respond to you directly as a sign of some respect, and self-defense as well.

The personal BS you spout, if gone unanswered, I can "see" the smirk of satisfaction on your face, thinking you've hit a nerve or something.

But then, it annoys me that your purpose, in part, is to dredge a response, like you just do it for attention or perverted satisfaction. It's trollish.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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Kabob, one of my faults is I push back, and I never stop. It's why I can work 36 straight hours on a project I want done. Wife not to happy of course.
Why I was unstoppable in uniform.
I can no more not push back then you can admit to being wrong.
Look above where you couldn't just say, " your right, those beetles are a bitch"
The McCabe thread where you denied to the end you didn't say things in a post you had just made.
When you do that, push at me, all bets are off when I push back.
When you said lets have a truce, I stopped pushing back. Hell, I ment what I said that I enjoyed your project pictures. I had no problem with you diverting the topic, what did it hurt? Nothing at all.
But, when you have to break that with a nasty reply, I have to push back, nature of the beast.
Yes Hubel is a bit out of it. He is right, if you do your own research on many things. Site placement of temp reading is one, and easy to find gov sources to verify. He sucks at explaining the whole picture, and gives only pieces to go by. AR is the only forum site I'm on. Gives me plenty of time to look up facts of whats posted I'm curious about. I don't have to rush to the next site to post the same thing somewhere else.
We certainly could have good debates about things if you could be civil in your reasons and questions. As I said, you struggle with your issues, I admit to mine.
 
Posts: 4671 | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Well, this is the only forum that I participate in as well. Over a year ago I tried others, and gave up.

Anyway, perhaps we're making progress in getting along.

We'll see. But don't expect me to be quiet when you put on the personal attacks.

As I said, if I bother to respond, that can be considered respect to some degree, and I'm "listening" and considering what you have to say, whether I agree or not.


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Reality: Resistance is Futile.

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Posts: 13663 | Location: Depends on the Season | Registered: 17 February 2017Reply With Quote
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ALL THE CRAP ABOUT FIRE, BEATLES, ETC, still due to the stands getting old.

and poor management, and the stands get older quicker cause of the ocean climate shift

to the north.Warming the north. And the area the climate shifted away from gets cooler

and when averaged out with accurate weather stations there is no warming.

And in all this process CO2 is no the problem...


MZEE WA SIKU
 
Posts: 27742 | Registered: 03 February 2003Reply With Quote
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