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"Bumping" 416's to 423
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I was wondering (being at least as cheap as many here say they are) if it would be practical to bump up .416" bullets (Hornady and Speer, etc.) to .423". I called CH-4D and asked them if it was practical to do it on a reloading press and, if so, how much.
He replied that it was do-able and that the dies would be $125.00. I realize that this would probably work on soft points only.
Anybody have an thoughts on this, foreseable problems, etc?


"I ask, sir, what is the Militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effective way to enslave them" - George Mason, co-author of the Second Amendment during the Virginia convention to ratify the Constitution
 
Posts: 1699 | Location: San Antonio, TX | Registered: 14 April 2004Reply With Quote
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What type of press would be needed for this? I have gone to a Co-Ax recently....but you may have hit on a good idea given the price of 90 cents plus per bullet for the .423's.


Good hunting,

Andy

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Thomas Jefferson: “To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.”

 
Posts: 6707 | Location: Oklahoma, USA | Registered: 14 March 2001Reply With Quote
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Bill would this work for the bullets for 425 WR? Did you find out what kind of press is required.. I have a Corbin
 
Posts: 159 | Location: Salt Lake City, Utah | Registered: 15 February 2006Reply With Quote
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I have a call in to Dave at CH4D. Will post info after we speak. Welcome to AR, Dr. LSW!


Good hunting,

Andy

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Thomas Jefferson: “To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.”

 
Posts: 6707 | Location: Oklahoma, USA | Registered: 14 March 2001Reply With Quote
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I decided not to order the bump die and accoutrements. Don't think I'll shoot the 404 enough to pay for the difference in 416 and 423 bullet prices. Dave has the setup and it is $200.


Good hunting,

Andy

-----------------------------
Thomas Jefferson: “To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.”

 
Posts: 6707 | Location: Oklahoma, USA | Registered: 14 March 2001Reply With Quote
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Obviously, the stronger the press one has, the less likely he will damage it. But, I have done a lot of bullet-swaging on the old RCBS A-3 press, and a lot of bullet bumping on just a plain old Rock-Chucker. It has never harmed either press in any discernable manner.

I haven't bumped any .416's to .423" on the Rock-Chucker, but have done bullets with at least that much expansion required, so would not fear at all doing it on any "made-for-swaging" press, such as a Corbin, or a beefy loading press such as an RCBS A-2 or A-3.

I would NOT try it on a Bonanza Co-Ax. Might work fine, and I have a Co-Ax, but it just doesn't seem all that great in the leverage department to me.

I don't know if it is true, but some engineer friends in the shooting business rtell me that if a person works the press fast (quickly?), it is both easier on the press and makes the bullets more consistent. To me that is counter-intuitive, but they swear it is true.


My country gal's just a moonshiner's daughter, but I love her still.

 
Posts: 9685 | Location: Cave Creek 85331, USA | Registered: 17 August 2001Reply With Quote
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Do a search for user name BAW. I believe he used to paper-patch jacketed 416s for his 404J.
Cheers...
Con
 
Posts: 2197 | Location: Australia | Registered: 24 August 2001Reply With Quote
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The CSP-1 Corbin S-Press will easily turn a .416 into a .423 using the same point form die that you would get as part of a regular bullet swaging set.

You can add the core swage and core seater if you want to actually make the bullets, rather than convert ready-made ones. That gives you control over weights, style, construction, etc.

But I agree that the cost of these tools isn't really practical for just a few bullets. If you were to get a class 6 license and start selling them, or were shooting 200-300 a month, it would make good economic sense. Otherwise, probably not. But technically, it makes perfect sense.

As to the speed of stroke, this comes into play in lots of bullet and jacket forming operations. The issue is locally generated heat from the friction of changing the material shape. We've all burned our fingers bending a piece of wire back and forth, as kids. As you bend it faster, it heats up more quickly because the heat doesn't have time to dissipate into the air before the next bend adds more.

With jacket drawing, and some bullet forming steps, running the press a little faster builds up useful heat that can assist in forming the part at lower pressure. It isn't usually enough to feel, and quickly is drawn off into the die, press frame, and the air around them. But it can make a difference in how easily the metal flows under pressure. It isn't always a benefit to go faster, but when it helps, that's usually the reason behind it.
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Medford, Oregon | Registered: 29 September 2006Reply With Quote
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