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Time to get a new powder scale. Was thinking about a digital scale. been using a RCBS 505 for about 40 years. Time to retire it. What does everyone use? I don't need a monster just a good one economical one would work for me. Thanks for the info.
 
Posts: 85 | Location: Lexington, Ky | Registered: 02 April 2004Reply With Quote
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Id keep the one you have. I don't think they wear out..MIne are all 50 to 60 years old.


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 38347 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With Quote
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Yep but wouldn't mind having another just for fun. Kind of like wanting another gun. Just for fun.
 
Posts: 85 | Location: Lexington, Ky | Registered: 02 April 2004Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by tvlog:
Time to get a new powder scale. Was thinking about a digital scale. been using a RCBS 505 for about 40 years. Time to retire it. What does everyone use? I don't need a monster just a good one economical one would work for me. Thanks for the info.


Get an A&D; expensive, but totally kicks the ass of anything RCBS or Hornady sells - and completely blows balance scales out of the water. Fast and accurate. Doesn't drift or require constant recalibration. will instantly show the effect of dropping one kernel of powder in the pan. Accuracy to .01 grains (actually kind of weird when you fist start using it because most loads won't weigh exactly what you want, eg, instead of 78.5 it will show 78.7; taking one kernel out results in 78.1).


Don't Ever Book a Hunt with Jeff Blair
http://forums.accuratereloadin...821061151#2821061151

 
Posts: 7433 | Location: Arizona and off grid in CO | Registered: 28 July 2004Reply With Quote
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quote:
(actually kind of weird when you fist start using it because most loads won't weigh exactly what you want, eg, instead of 78.5 it will show 78.7; taking one kernel out results in 78.1)

That's the most eloquent example I've seen for NOT getting an electronic scale. There is no powder on the market with a single kernel which weighs as much as .6 grain. None are even close. But I'm sure that the poster is telling the truth about the inconsistency of electronic scales. They are subject to variations with static electricity, small drafts of air, humidity, and even florescent lighting! If the charge in the pan isn't the weight you want, just remove the pan from the scale and place it back on until the scale registers the weight you're looking for.

As Ray says, balance beam scales are forever. I have an Ohaus 10-10 that dates to 1969 and never misses the correct reading with a set of calibrated brass check weights.
 
Posts: 12793 | Location: Henly, TX, USA | Registered: 04 April 2001Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Stonecreek:
quote:
(actually kind of weird when you fist start using it because most loads won't weigh exactly what you want, eg, instead of 78.5 it will show 78.7; taking one kernel out results in 78.1)

That's the most eloquent example I've seen for NOT getting an electronic scale. There is no powder on the market with a single kernel which weighs as much as .6 grain. None are even close. But I'm sure that the poster is telling the truth about the inconsistency of electronic scales. They are subject to variations with static electricity, small drafts of air, humidity, and even florescent lighting! If the charge in the pan isn't the weight you want, just remove the pan from the scale and place it back on until the scale registers the weight you're looking for.

As Ray says, balance beam scales are forever. I have an Ohaus 10-10 that dates to 1969 and never misses the correct reading with a set of calibrated brass check weights.


Sorry, I was off by one digit. Instead of 78.5 you might bet 78.46; add another kernel and you might get 78.50 but you might bet 78.52 - that is how sensitive it is. But I was wrong on the accuracy; it is .02 grains, not .01. But I don't care; the speed of this thing is totally worth the money.

A&D scales do not use load cells like cheaper scales, they use magnetic force. I have an RCBC 204, which was the top of the line balance beam scale, and the A&D kicks its butt.

Let's put it this way Stonecreek: I know quite a few competitive shooters; none use a balance beam scale.

Your post makes me recall that last year on a discussion of Covid/investments that you were critical of my real estate investments too. Glad I didn't listen to you then either.


Don't Ever Book a Hunt with Jeff Blair
http://forums.accuratereloadin...821061151#2821061151

 
Posts: 7433 | Location: Arizona and off grid in CO | Registered: 28 July 2004Reply With Quote
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I dare anyone to tell me that .5 of a grain can actually make a practical difference to a load!

In the larger cases, like the 378 Weatherby, sometimes 2 grains more powder gives you lower velocity.

Strange, but I have seen it happen many times.

And I am not the only one experiencing this.


www.accuratereloading.com
Instagram : ganyana2000
 
Posts: 57700 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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quote:
I dare anyone to tell me that .5 of a grain can actually make a practical difference to a load!

THIS!
 
Posts: 1245 | Location: south of austin texas | Registered: 25 November 2011Reply With Quote
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Thing is I have run tests.

In cases like the 223 I varied loads by 0.3 of a grain.

In cases like the 308 I varied loads by 0.5 of a grain.

In cases like the 270 I varied loads by 1 grain.

In cases like the 378 Weatherby I varied loads by 1.5 grains.

All in the cause of learning what makes a difference!


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Posts: 57700 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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Isn't this why people run those ladder loads.
It's to figure where small changes make no difference.



quote:
Originally posted by john c.:
quote:
I dare anyone to tell me that .5 of a grain can actually make a practical difference to a load!

THIS!
 
Posts: 5418 | Location: NY, NY | Registered: 28 November 2005Reply With Quote
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It depends on the operator and his ability to make the same move with each dump, and to a certain degree it depends on the powder, ball powders measure more accurately for me anyway..


Ray Atkinson
Atkinson Hunting Adventures
10 Ward Lane,
Filer, Idaho, 83328
208-731-4120

rayatkinsonhunting@gmail.com
 
Posts: 38347 | Location: Twin Falls, Idaho | Registered: 04 June 2000Reply With Quote
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quote:
I dare anyone to tell me that .5 of a grain can actually make a practical difference to a load





 
Posts: 2638 | Location: Lakewood, CO | Registered: 15 February 2003Reply With Quote
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I replaced my 505 with a 10/10 RCBS and love it. I messed with a digital scale for a short time and will never use one again, but that's just me.


Dennis
Life member NRA
 
Posts: 1144 | Location: Ft. Morgan, CO | Registered: 15 April 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Sorry, I was off by one digit.


My fault for taking what you wrote at face value. I should have assumed that your statement was inaccurate to begin with and ignored it.
 
Posts: 12793 | Location: Henly, TX, USA | Registered: 04 April 2001Reply With Quote
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I have used a RCBS 505 for 50 years, last year I decided to treat myself and bought a RCBS M1000 Scale. A nice scale and glad I have it but I still use the 505 for reloading. Much easier to get along with.
 
Posts: 2638 | Location: Lakewood, CO | Registered: 15 February 2003Reply With Quote
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I used an Oahu’s 1010 for forty years. Then a Dillon e scale of some sort. It died after a few years. Then I bought a Lyman that’s about the size of a deck of cards. Seems to work very well for the four years I’ve owned it, and IIRC it cost about $60.


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Posts: 2392 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: 08 December 2006Reply With Quote
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Most A&D's that will read grains are only accurate to .1g.

The A&D - EK-120i is accurate to .2 grains (.01g).
Used A&D 1200i for 30+ years. Always passed state inspection.


Life itself is a gift. Live it up if you can.
 
Posts: 4293 | Location: Near Hershey PA | Registered: 12 October 2012Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by MickinColo:
quote:
I dare anyone to tell me that .5 of a grain can actually make a practical difference to a load







I guarantee you will get different results if you tried this 10 times.


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Instagram : ganyana2000
 
Posts: 57700 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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You just asked for someone to show that .5 grains will or can make a difference.

This is a 2 piece stocked rifle, as long as I get it tuned properly it has held pretty true at 50.7 grains over the last 13 years.
 
Posts: 2638 | Location: Lakewood, CO | Registered: 15 February 2003Reply With Quote
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Saeed, Your post triggered a memory. It's been 15 years since I did load development on my 338-06 . But one powder did just that, at smaller amount though. I think it might have been Win760.
 
Posts: 20 | Registered: 27 November 2011Reply With Quote
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The reason I use an A&D isn't so much that it is dead nuts on, but it is fast. A balance beam scale is so slow it is insane. And inexpensive electronic scales drift constantly and need to be recalibrated.


Don't Ever Book a Hunt with Jeff Blair
http://forums.accuratereloadin...821061151#2821061151

 
Posts: 7433 | Location: Arizona and off grid in CO | Registered: 28 July 2004Reply With Quote
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I received an electronic Lyman scale for Christmas a few years back and like it very much.

With it and a 24 inch drop tube, I recently loaded my FIRST ever zero average 5 shot velocity deviation .405 WCF 400 grain Woodleigh load. Three shots had zero deviation and there was 1 foot per second above and 1 foot per second below my target load. BTW, I had three witnesses at the range that saw and recorded the Chronograph display.
The final MV was 2076 fps and exactly equal to the 450/400 regulation velocity of a DR of one of my witnesses. That same load had taken multiple ele and buff for him and his clients in southern Africa. Good enough for me.

Since this ammo was accurate and for a Cape Buffalo hunt, I stuck with that load and made two very accurate shots with it in RSA.


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Posts: 2022 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 25 May 2009Reply With Quote
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