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Picture of samir
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Would you rather go on one quality safari with nice camp and known name PH or take a chance and go on two safaris with lesser know PH’s or outfitters? Comparing apples to apples, DG or plains game and same amount of hunting days. I personally would rather go on more hunts just to have that many more experiences and time planning which I enjoy. I guess this would apply to people that don’t have money to throw around Wink


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Posts: 1317 | Location: San Diego | Registered: 02 July 2005Reply With Quote
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I know what you are getting at and I reserve swimming pools and high decor for vacation and not hunting.

Often a comfortable bed, hot shower, and ice in your cocktail are all that you need. Obviously good opportunities for the game you are hunting.


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Posts: 8757 | Location: Zambia | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by fairgame:
I know what you are getting at and I reserve swimming pools and high decor for vacation and not hunting.

Often a comfortable bed, hot shower, and ice in your cocktail are all that you need. Obviously good opportunities for the game you are hunting.


tu2It seems to me that the cost of a safari has more to do with the quality of the area and the game than the outfitter. Given that, I would rather have one hunt in a top area than two in a lesser location.


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Posts: 517 | Location: Maryland Eastern Shore | Registered: 27 September 2013Reply With Quote
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It is more about the time in field for me than quality of the camp or how the game will score, and I am not able to afford the top end anyway. So I would go for quantity over quality.


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Posts: 487 | Location: North Texas | Registered: 26 May 2009Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by fairgame:
I know what you are getting at and I reserve swimming pools and high decor for vacation and not hunting.

Often a comfortable bed, hot shower, and ice in your cocktail are all that you need. Obviously good opportunities for the game you are hunting.


Complete agreement. I've been in a few camps with pools. Never once have I gone swimming in Africa (while hunting)

Superfulous goodies that perform no function aren't of interest.


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Posts: 2530 | Location: Phoenix, Arizona | Registered: 26 April 2010Reply With Quote
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I've hunted some luxury camps, but none with swimming pools and everywhere I've ever hunted, swimming would be rather dicey to say the least.
 
Posts: 7929 | Location: Houston, Texas | Registered: 26 December 2005Reply With Quote
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I don’t think these are mutually exclusive. I have found that good camps and accommodations in a good area usually go together. I have had a couple of bad hunts that accompanied low quality everything else. I don’t care about a swimming pool, but would use it if it was there. You won’t see pools in Zim or other places where there is dangerous game. You get the extras at some RSA camps and Namibia camps. However, pick the area, pick the right PH and go hunt!
 
Posts: 9265 | Location: Texas... time to secede!! | Registered: 12 February 2004Reply With Quote
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I want 3 things.

1. Good quality hunting that is neither a petting zoo, nor a shot out scenario.

2. Not to be hassled or worked over by the guide or outfitter. Drama free hunt.

3. Safety and Security from political strife, crime or harassment by local populace.

The following are also nice:

4. Large tracts of quality habitat

5. Reasonably comfortable lodging, but I can also sleep in the back of my truck on my own mattress.

6. Good laughs with a fun crew

7. A reason to come back
 
Posts: 7260 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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Picture of Use Enough Gun
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quote:
I know what you are getting at and I reserve swimming pools and high decor for vacation and not hunting.

Come to think of it, in 16 Safaris I have never used the swimming pool one time. Big Grin Only two camps did not have one. All of the others did-dangerous game or not, including the BVC. Big Grin
 
Posts: 16185 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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There where swimming pools at camp in Zim at Charisma and in the omay..... I didn't use them.....

I go to hunt!
 
Posts: 39123 | Location: Crosby and Barksdale, Texas | Registered: 18 September 2006Reply With Quote
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In 2018 I jumped in the pool but only to cool off from my 4 mile runs at lunch time.


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Posts: 7404 | Location: Arizona and off grid in CO | Registered: 28 July 2004Reply With Quote
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The only times I have used the pool was in Burkina Faso in April. At 130 degrees I didn’t mind sharing the pool with the water scorpions and bees


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Posts: 1317 | Location: San Diego | Registered: 02 July 2005Reply With Quote
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That I recall I have not swam in a pool while hunting, actually the only camp I recall having a pool was the Ume Camp in the Omay.

I did however go swimming/wading in the river on the camp at LU5 in the Selous. Not one of my smartest moves.

I never found a huge difference in overall cost when comparing different hunts in the same country with reputable outfitters or even new ones that are legitimate.

Airline tickets are the same price
Trophy fees in general are similar
P&D, taxidermy, freight are handled by others

There are some savings on getting to the area maybe, depending on locale, a new PH may not charge to bring you to concession from town.

Some savings in day rates, but on a ten day hunt that may amount to $3000 maybe.

Keep in mind I think in terms of Zimbabwe and using licensed PH's in decent areas.

I like saving money, no frills needed, but I will spend extra to hunt where I want and with whom I want.
 
Posts: 2898 | Registered: 26 March 2008Reply With Quote
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For me a quality safari normally comes with a reputable PH and reputable PHs get that way by hunting quality areas.
 
Posts: 1451 | Location: Sinton, Texas | Registered: 08 November 2006Reply With Quote
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There was no pool by our camp.

But a very nice river, full of crocs at night.

One evening we counted 35 right in front of the camp.

When I jump in there for a swim Maktoum goes absolutely berserk!

We never see crocs in the day time, so I was safe! clap


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Posts: 55873 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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For me, more days are better.

I’d rather pay for hunting than amenities.

That being said, having a reduced cost safari can bite you on the butt. I’ve shot the big 5 now, so going and seeing something different is fun... I’m going back and doing things I enjoyed before. My risk tolerance is probably higher than many- but I’d want a PH I could trust. I’m planning on trying leopard again- but at this point, getting the cat is definitely not my main goal- having fun is. No night hunting, etc. Maybe even ask the PH if he will supervise and let me run the whole thing... it’s for fun, after all.
 
Posts: 6682 | Location: Minnesota USA | Registered: 15 June 2007Reply With Quote
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Picture of tanks
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It depends. If I am by myself I have been fine with accommodations like these:




However, I would like to do a Tanzania or a Zambia hunt with a female companion with accommodations like these:

 
Posts: 924 | Location: Southern CA | Registered: 01 January 2014Reply With Quote
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Picture of jdollar
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by MikeBurke:
That I recall I have not swam in a pool while hunting, actually the only camp I recall having a pool was the Ume Camp in the Omay.

I did however go swimming/wading in the river on the camp at LU5 in the Selous. Not one of my smartest moves.

I never found a huge difference in overall cost when comparing different hunts in the same country with reputable outfitters or even new ones that are legitimate.

Airline tickets are the same price
Trophy fees in general are similar
P&D, taxidermy, freight are handled by others

There are some savings on getting to the area maybe, depending on locale, a new PH may not charge to bring you to concession from town.

Some savings in day rates, but on a ten day hunt that may amount to $3000 maybe.

Keep in mind I think in terms of Zimbabwe and using licensed PH's in decent areas.

I like saving money, no frills needed, but I will spend extra to hunt where I want and with whom I want

My PH and I used that Ume Camp “pool” every evening when we came in from a fun day tracking buffalo in the hills and Tiger Bay jesse- clothes and all. Bear in mind it was mid October and hotter than hell.....
 
Posts: 9484 | Location: Georgia | Registered: 28 October 2006Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by tanks:
It depends. If I am by myself I have been fine with accommodations like these:




However, I would like to do a Tanzania or a Zambia hunt with a female companion with accommodations like these:



I don't think any of the women in my life (wife and 4 daughters would like a camp like that). Unless there was yoga and fresh organic veg and all that BS.

Honestly booking a hunt that was in that $100,000 range would probably result in a divorce.

So if I was to end up on a hunt like that, I'd book some nympho per hour type gal with implants and a perfect body to enjoy it with.

Divorce is going to be oncoming anyway might as well enjoy it.
 
Posts: 7260 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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Saeed,

Yes, you see them at night from the reflections of their eyes, but they are there 24/7. The one animal I'll admit to being truly afraid of. No thanks, I'll stay out of the river.
 
Posts: 7929 | Location: Houston, Texas | Registered: 26 December 2005Reply With Quote
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I was told by a PH that he had a client shoot a croc in the water.

They went in to get it.

One of the trackers stepped on it, and it was not dead.

They levitated out of the water, and reached the bank without getting any wetter!

They lost it, as no one wanted to go in again.

I shot a croc in the Luzi River in Chete.

He was in the water too.

Roy went in to get it.

We asked him isn't that dangerous?

He held a piece of the crocs skull in his hands, saying "Not with this in my hand"

As I shot, we could see large chunks of skull flying all over teh place.


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Posts: 55873 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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If I have time and can find them, I may post photos of some of the camps we have called home while hunting in the Selous with Tanganyika Wildlife Safaris, which was owned by the Pasanisi family.

They were luxurious camps, but there were no swimming pools, as this was the Selous.

We had fine tents, larger than hotel rooms in 5 star hotels, complete with a double bed, Persian rugs, and en suite bathrooms open to the sky, featuring water in canvas bags hung overhead and heated on wood fires to precisely the right temperature for a comfortable end-of-day maji moto shower.

We were blessed by truly professional camp managers and maitres d'hotel, Michelin quality chefs who would put three star restaurants to shame, and multiple waiters dressed in white with maroon cummerbunds, no less.

Our meals were served on bone china, and consisted of soups and nuts, as appetizers, and main courses fit for true carnivores (which we are and will be until death do us part). We almost always feasted on game we had shot, including nyati, kongoni, swala pala, tohe, punda milia (properly butchered and trimmed of that awful yellow fat), nyumbu and even ngiri, the latter marinated in a delicious sauce made primarily of Dijon mustard, oranges, salt, pepper and garlic.

The food was accompanied, as we had requested, by fine French red wines, notably St. Estephes, Pomerols, St. Juliens and Margaux, served in crystal goblets.

Meals were always followed by delicious desserts, including fruit tarts, custards, cakes and chocolate banana puddings, and afterwards, by aperitifs by the ever present fire, on the banks of the hippo-filled Njenje or Mbarangandu rivers.

Chakula tayari were our favorite Swahili words, and for good reason!

All of this we enjoyed, right in the middle of a primordial African wilderness, miles and miles and miles from the nearest village.

Besides the camps, the hunting was excellent. We had licenses for all of the Big Four, including up to three nyati, and virtually every variety of plains game, which we hunted every day, from morning until dusk. The Pasanisis always had the finest of PHs, mostly from the Continent, and mostly French. They were strong and hard-driving and hard hunting professionals. Bert Klineburger once likened the toughest and most focused ones to Foreign Legionnaires, and warned us to be fit and ready. We always were.

So, I guess that makes me a fan of quality AND quantity.

These experiences, admittedly, spoiled the hell out of us, and made every other camp we have ever had pale in comparison, more or less. But these camps, also admittedly, set an impossibly high bar, and one did pay a very high price for the comforts they offered. Overhead in the wilderness is high, and there must always be profit beyond that.

We have found more basic camps elsewhere in Africa and around the world to be quite comfortable, but just not as quite. We have found some others to be dirty and miserable, although never in Africa. In Africa, quality always has been and is now, in our experience, at the higher end of the spectrum.

I am afraid, however, that that the luxury we experienced with the Pasanisis, and the kind of peak hunting experience that they provided, are now gone for good. No more elephant imports. No more lion imports. At least not for us Americans. Few will pay 5 star prices for 2 star hunting, no matter how fine the camp may be. And that, and other factors, especially rampant and uncontrolled poaching syndicates, finally drove the Pasanisis out of business.

The Pasanisis are French, but they followed and improved upon the British standard for East African hunting. And the British set the right standard, in my view. Why suffer in the wilderness, when one can bring his civilization, including fine food, drink and comfort, along with him?


Mike

Edited on advice of counsel.
 
Posts: 11316 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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Michael Robinson,
I really enjoy your posts. You have enjoyed many unique and great experiences.
Most of my remote hunts have been in the wilderness of the Yukon, NWT and BC where coming back to our tent at night I was happy to crack open a can of peaches and a couple of beers I stashed in my saddle bags . The older I get the less I enjoy sleeping on the ground. Nothing wrong with enjoying creature comforts in the wilderness where you also have fantastic hunting. I can’t think of a more enjoyable way to enjoy ones self on a safari as you have described.
 
Posts: 355 | Location: Western USA | Registered: 08 September 2018Reply With Quote
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Fact is there are so many options out there, and choices are many.

I've PH'ed all over the place.

To me, and call me 'old fashioned'if you want, but there is nothing better than a safari conducted in the remotest of remote areas, from a camp adequately and tactfully equipped and yet simplistic, within a game rich environment, in which hard work and effort is required to take down quality game.

I've always held the idea that a safari take on the ambience and romance of hunts of yesteryear, coupled with modern communications devises (for emergencies) and a good vehicle for access into tough regions. It doesn't take much to equip the camp into a comfortable place to enjoy the iced whiskey around the evening campfire and enjoy the culinary skills of a camp cook, before retiring to a warm bed in anticipation of what the next day may bring.

Different strokes for different folks.
 
Posts: 509 | Location: The Plains of Africa | Registered: 07 November 2006Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Neil-PH:
Fact is there are so many options out there, and choices are many.

I've PH'ed all over the place.

To me, and call me 'old fashioned'if you want, but there is nothing better than a safari conducted in the remotest of remote areas, from a camp adequately and tactfully equipped and yet simplistic, within a game rich environment, in which hard work and effort is required to take down quality game.

I've always held the idea that a safari take on the ambience and romance of hunts of yesteryear, coupled with modern communications devises (for emergencies) and a good vehicle for access into tough regions. It doesn't take much to equip the camp into a comfortable place to enjoy the iced whiskey around the evening campfire and enjoy the culinary skills of a camp cook, before retiring to a warm bed in anticipation of what the next day may bring.

Different strokes for different folks.


100% Agree


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Posts: 2118 | Registered: 29 May 2005Reply With Quote
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I have to agree with Neil. Roger Whittal once told me that most clients want a rustic camp as opposed to a high end photographic type camp.

On a safari in the Matetsi area, when the hunt was done and they were bringing in new clients, we went to a fancy photo camp for the one day. Very fancy and rarely have I been less impressed or more bored.
 
Posts: 1431 | Location: Alberta/Namibia | Registered: 29 November 2004Reply With Quote
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.

Done both and got the T shirts too! Tented camp three days in the Namib was fantastic and have enjoyed high end lodges in various countries. Swimming pools too but had to drawn the line when hunting with Buzz end of one season and he suggested bringing the inflatable kiddies pool to take the edge off the heat! We couldn't take his kids' pool, Steff would never have forgiven us! I guess quantity / quality is an each to their own debate. Boils down to value for money I guess.



.


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Posts: 1704 | Location: South Africa & Europe | Registered: 10 February 2014Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Neil-PH:
Fact is there are so many options out there, and choices are many.

I've PH'ed all over the place.

To me, and call me 'old fashioned'if you want, but there is nothing better than a safari conducted in the remotest of remote areas, from a camp adequately and tactfully equipped and yet simplistic, within a game rich environment, in which hard work and effort is required to take down quality game.

I've always held the idea that a safari take on the ambience and romance of hunts of yesteryear, coupled with modern communications devises (for emergencies) and a good vehicle for access into tough regions. It doesn't take much to equip the camp into a comfortable place to enjoy the iced whiskey around the evening campfire and enjoy the culinary skills of a camp cook, before retiring to a warm bed in anticipation of what the next day may bring.

Different strokes for different folks.


My sentiments exactly. I communicate with my hunters as to what they want to eat and drink. Pointless taking cheap Whisky to the bush.


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Posts: 8757 | Location: Zambia | Registered: 10 April 2009Reply With Quote
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Coming back to the OP's original question If I remember correctly we've been in 27 safari camps in 8 different countries and I think all but one offered a 'Quality" experience with everything you need to be comfortable. Quality in my book is not synonymous with luxury. Also I only had one safari that I thought was overpriced and over hyped otherwise I think I've received what I paid for.

Mark


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Posts: 12050 | Location: LAS VEGAS, NV USA | Registered: 04 August 2002Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by MARK H. YOUNG:
Coming back to the OP's original question If I remember correctly we've been in 27 safari camps in 8 different countries and I think all but one offered a 'Quality" experience with everything you need to be comfortable. Quality in my book is not synonymous with luxury. Also I only had one safari that I thought was overpriced and over hyped otherwise I think I've received what I paid for.


Mark

I agree with your post.
Let me give you an example. I have been on 9 safaris to 6 countries that I have paid for and 5 of the 9 have been for DG (2 lions,1 leopard,1 elephant and 11 buff plus plains game). Two of the safaris were to Tanzania which in general isn’t a cheap country to hunt. Also shot the northern species near lake Natron.
One of my friend went to Tanzania with a high end outfit and shot lion leopard and 3 buffalo for right around $125,000.
All of my 9 hunts together were less than his one $125,000 plus look at all the different experiences and countries I was able to see.


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Posts: 1317 | Location: San Diego | Registered: 02 July 2005Reply With Quote
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