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Demographics of African Hunters
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Picture of Michael Robinson
posted
They say hunters are getting older, that fewer young people are hunting these days than in bygone days.

It seems reasonable to assume that this is especially true of those who hunt in Africa.

Knowing that this is an informal, and not necessarily representative, poll of African hunters, please let us know to which generation you belong.

If nothing else, if enough of us participate, at least we'll know the percentages of age groups to which African hunting AR members belong!

I'm betting it's Boomers that predominate (even though we've shrunken to about 24% of the total population, at least in the USA). But I would hope that Gen Xers are holding their own.

Let's see.

Question:
African Hunters Poll

To which generation do you belong?

Choices:
The Greatest Generation – Born between 1901-1926 – Age 94+
The Silent Generation – Born between 1927 and 1945 – Age 75-93
Baby Boomers – Born between 1946 and 1964 – Age 56-74
Gen X – Born between 1965 and 1980 – Age 40-55
Millenials – Born between 1981 and 2000

 


Mike

An ounce of experience is worth a pound of theory.
 
Posts: 11080 | Location: New England | Registered: 06 June 2003Reply With Quote
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I do not know of a single Z Gen that hunts. Those are the earlier than 2000 group.

I am a Gen-X and most of the people I know that have hunted Africa are either Gen X, or Boomers. But I do know about 10 Milennials that went to gether in Germany to AFrica.

I am hoping I can get my younger daughters into it 5, 7, and 9.

My son in law grew up in a house with a single mom (but she looks like a 40 year old Linda Carter!). I doubt I will be able to get my grandsons 1 and 2 in the hunting fields.
 
Posts: 6844 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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There are a couple of us millionials in here hunting Domestically and International.

I am the only person in my age class that I know in KY and TN that hunts internationally. I am a good 6-10 years older than them.

I am hoping to spend my 33rd birthday in England hunting Roe Deer this August coming.

Hunting along with conservative politics is being breed out.
 
Posts: 3778 | Location: Somewhere above Tennessee and below Kentucky  | Registered: 31 July 2016Reply With Quote
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Ray wants to know if there's anything earlier than the first category :-)
 
Posts: 18309 | Location: Very NW NJ up in the Mountains | Registered: 14 June 2009Reply With Quote
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My father is of the Silent Generation. He never hunted anywhere but Wyoming, Montana, New Mexico and Alaska. He went with my uncles to Saskatchewan on a fly in fishing trip a couple of times.

My grandfather hunted tigers in India and Cape Buffalo in Kenya, but like me he lived all over the world. He served as an Army EOD guy clearing the beaches on Sicily, Normandy and North Africa during WWII.
 
Posts: 6844 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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Picture of T.J.
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quote:
Originally posted by LHeym500:
There are a couple of us millionials in here hunting Domestically and International.


Confirmed. Another millennial checking in.

It's funny, one of my most satisfying hunting accomplishments (for lack of a better term I guess) was convincing one of my fellow millennial colleagues to hunt Africa along with me. That was in 2018 and we will be going back in the next few years to have a go at some bull elephant and more buffalo.

I would venture a guess that there are more millennials hunting internationally, and Africa for that matter, than most people would think.



 
Posts: 147 | Location: Ft. Worth, TX | Registered: 31 July 2015Reply With Quote
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I know of one Z who hunts: Martin Lane Easter
Big Grin


____________

Lane

Progressives don’t just have disdain for Conservatives...they loathe the very ground they walk on.
 
Posts: 27694 | Location: Gainesville, TX | Registered: 24 December 2006Reply With Quote
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I wonder how many 80 year olds are still making the trip.

The client the week before me in Namibia died in a hotel room in Windhoek. It was his second safari of the trip, he had started in South Africa and they had picked him up in Uppington, and when they took him to Windhoek he died the night he got there. Killed like 30 animals in two weeks between both countries, was his first safari.

He was mid-80's I don't remember how old exactly.
 
Posts: 6844 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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I’m gen X.

I know a lot of younger folks who hunt, but very few of them travel and hunt- not because they have no desire, but rather a combination of financial and time management issues.

I took the job I did because of the vacation policy allowing longer vacations. That’s one issue that affects the more affluent younger crowd- they really have no time to themselves. Younger folks are starting careers and families. The days where a guy could take two weeks off for a hunting trip without the wife and kids seem to be over for young families. Taking a preteen on an extended trip hunting with no other activities planned will likely not go well. Maybe you can get one kid to enjoy the hunt, but all of them and the wife as well?

So the time required and the financial costs along with the trend towards whole family vacations puts hunting overseas into the older age group.

Add to the tendency to want to go as a group, and you really are limiting your market share.


That and more younger people don’t like being out of constant communication.

Hunting overseas tends to be remote, expensive, and seen as being a bit risky. All reasons that other pursuits get indulged in first.
 
Posts: 6258 | Location: Minnesota USA | Registered: 15 June 2007Reply With Quote
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I'm a Babyboomer and have been to Africa (10) times. My last two safaris I introduced a friend of mine who is a GenX'er to Zambia. He's hooked!

He may be an exception in the fact that, these were his first two hunts of his life. I suppose most people start with rabbit and squirrels, and then perhaps advance to deer/hogs. His first animal he shot in his life was a Blue Wildebeest...
 
Posts: 2016 | Location: Colorado | Registered: 26 May 2010Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by T.J.:
quote:
Originally posted by LHeym500:
There are a couple of us millionials in here hunting Domestically and International.


Confirmed. Another millennial checking in.

It's funny, one of my most satisfying hunting accomplishments (for lack of a better term I guess) was convincing one of my fellow millennial colleagues to hunt Africa along with me. That was in 2018 and we will be going back in the next few years to have a go at some bull elephant and more buffalo.

I would venture a guess that there are more millennials hunting internationally, and Africa for that matter, than most people would think.


My daughter is a millennial and is hunting waterfowl and will be going to Zim with her boyfriend and me next summer. He is also a millennial.


USMC Retired
DSC Life Member
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Posts: 466 | Location: Maryland Eastern Shore | Registered: 27 September 2013Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Big Wonderful Wyoming:
I wonder how many 80 year olds are still making the trip.

The client the week before me in Namibia died in a hotel room in Windhoek. It was his second safari of the trip, he had started in South Africa and they had picked him up in Uppington, and when they took him to Windhoek he died the night he got there. Killed like 30 animals in two weeks between both countries, was his first safari.

He was mid-80's I don't remember how old exactly.


Was he alone in the hotel? Not a bad way to “peg out.”


USMC Retired
DSC Life Member
SCI Life Member
NRA Life Member
 
Posts: 466 | Location: Maryland Eastern Shore | Registered: 27 September 2013Reply With Quote
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gen x

been hunting africa for last 10 years - 6 trips

kind of lost interest in killing stuff. i can to shoot a few impala and bush pig and be just as happy as hunting buffalo or lion.

probably do another 1/2 dozen trips but my focus has shifted to fishing for near term

there are few hunters past 70 - it’s a 50-65 core age group demographics and the future is not pretty for african hunting

Mike


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.

Bernard Baruch
 
Posts: 11376 | Location: Cocoa Beach, Florida | Registered: 22 July 2010Reply With Quote
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I'm a Baby Boomer. 16 Safaris and likely finished.(There's always hope for a few more) Too many other things to do closer to home, especially with COVID and other issues hanging around. And, taxidermy and ungodly shipping expenses have been another nail in the coffin placed there by the greedy.
 
Posts: 15845 | Registered: 04 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Taxidermy is a horseshit expense.

Shipping sucks, but shipping and taxidermy together really make me question bringing the hides back.

I am looking at a buffalo game ranch combo hunt for 2022 (pending a globally clean covid-health bill). I have no plans to bring any capes back.
 
Posts: 6844 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by drongo:
quote:
Originally posted by Big Wonderful Wyoming:
I wonder how many 80 year olds are still making the trip.

The client the week before me in Namibia died in a hotel room in Windhoek. It was his second safari of the trip, he had started in South Africa and they had picked him up in Uppington, and when they took him to Windhoek he died the night he got there. Killed like 30 animals in two weeks between both countries, was his first safari.

He was mid-80's I don't remember how old exactly.


Was he alone in the hotel? Not a bad way to “peg out.”



He was the PH, wasn't very happy about it as he had to deal with it. I don't know anymore details, but apparently him and the agent had to contact next of kin and be somewhat available to deal with the guys remains.

If that happens to me, they can drop me off to be cremated, and ship what is left over to my wife. Cheaper!
 
Posts: 6844 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: 10 October 2012Reply With Quote
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I'm a silent gen guy myself and have already had covid and will have a certain degree of immunity and be ready to travel next time (and plan on staying out of hotels in Namibia.) One comment on bringing capes back. I can generally trade them to my taxidermist for some of his work, roughly $150 a piece. I got a zebra hide tanned for gemsbok, blue wildebeest, impala, waterbuck, eland and kudu capes (one each)


Dick Gunn

“You must always stop and roll in the good stuff;
it may not smell this way tomorrow.”

Lucy, a long deceased Basset Hound

"
 
Posts: 174 | Registered: 25 June 2010Reply With Quote
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Member of the silent generation. Not a day goes by I do not think about the hunts in Africa, the Selous in particular.

When I turned 70 I was thinking about what was going to give me the most bang for the $$. Bought a bass boat and get out at least twice a week. Looking at a bigger boat. Smiler

Good decision.


Jim "Bwana Umfundi"
NRA



 
Posts: 2999 | Location: State Of Jefferson | Registered: 27 March 2002Reply With Quote
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Picture of Charles_Helm
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My daughters hunt. Whether they will do it when I am not here to arrange it, I can't say.
 
Posts: 8746 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: 24 April 2004Reply With Quote
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Baby Boomer, 8 Africa safaris.

When I add them to my life-long experience hunting North America, it's fair to say I've probably approached my quota of big, brown eyed mammals. Done enough of it I reckon.

Moved on to multi-specie bird hunting in Argentina and Uruguay. Done 8 of those trips. Find them every bit as much fun as Africa, in different ways.

Yet I may take one more trip to Africa for buff, if for no other reason than nostalgia and to do so before such a trip becomes too much trouble and too much money. We're all witnessing the end of it.


114-R10David
 
Posts: 1643 | Location: Prescott, Az | Registered: 30 January 2007Reply With Quote
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Took nephew and, the next year, family friend to Namibia to hunt as high school graduation presents. Next year will take wife's niece, age 18, to Namibia to hunt. Neither of the boys had done any big game hunting, nor has the niece who, however, is a keen bird hunter.

Yes, CRButler has it right, the 30 and 40-year olds, for the most part, are too busy to hunt Africa with some few exceptions. Key is to keep the word out and to show how hunting is done right.

Regards, Tim
 
Posts: 1264 | Location: Washington, DC | Registered: 17 March 2003Reply With Quote
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I am at the very beginning of the millenials. I think you will see more and more of us hunting internationally. Up to this point we have been working on jobs and family and are now getting to the point where we have the disposable income to hunt more and families that are getting old enough to take along on the adventure. I know a lot of millenials who hunt and most are bringing up their kids to hunt as well.
 
Posts: 61 | Registered: 17 August 2013Reply With Quote
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In 2008, I was invited to a banquet of a local chapter of SCI. I was 32 and in law school (previously in the investment banking field, but we all know that was a bad time to be in finance, unless you had the fortitude and capital to be short). I bought on silent auction two hunts in RSA that included a fair amount of animals.

I never expected to “win” (no one wins an auction, you just pay the highest price. I was into both for less than $2,500 total as the auction closed. The first hunt was Eastern Cape 2x1 and included two springbok, two blesbok, and two grey duikers for the group of two hunters. The second was 1x1 in Limpopo with a blue wildebeest, zebra, kudu, and an impala.

I knew exactly that more days, hunters, and additional animals are appreciated on donated/auction hunts. I also knew who the additional hunter would be, my best hunting buddy. We were able to schedule both hunts back to back. My father had been to Africa once prior, but it was September, 2001.

He had a great time, but I knew he was to be my partner. He was not in the greatest shape at all, but a plan was made for him and a plan for me.

In the end, I think I took 16 animals and he took four. Most of my 16 were your typical PG animals, but never got a kudu, the one I really wanted. He took those to “fill in” what he hadn’t hunted before like eland (the best meat I’ve had), and a few others.

I did have all the taxidermy done down there, but did European mounts on about half. That cost about as much as the trip. However, I will know all the details of those animals from my one, and most likely last trip to Africa with my father. I’ve got so many NA mounts from our hunts together and I don’t recall the details as far as year, location, etc. Looking back, I should’ve put a reference on the backside of the mount.

I don’t know if I’ll do much more taxidermy beyond Euro, except when I go back and get a Cape Buffalo and kudu. I’ve shot water Buffalo and stags in Argentina and those mounts are used to decorate the lodges. I’m more of a bird hunter these days, and always have been.

I apologize for the off topic ramble. I suppose I’m Gen X, but have all generations of hunters in my blood. I just hope that I can have a kid to enjoy hunting with my father to keep the tradition alive.


I meant to be DSC Member...bad typing skills.

Marcus Cady

DRSS
 
Posts: 2856 | Location: Dallas | Registered: 19 March 2008Reply With Quote
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Well, I am only 2 years into Silent Gen...almost Boomer!!

19 safaris under the belt in 12 trips, plus 2 cruising around the continent, all but N Africa.

Been to Tanzania twice cruising, was planning an "experience the Selous" Buff hunt this year... but COVID scrapped that.... next year now if we can get a slot with all of the roll overs?? My partner is 78 now and can out walk most!!

I hope this is not my last...John Sharp is waiting for a repeat!!

CheerZ,


470EDDY
 
Posts: 1710 | Location: The Other Washington | Registered: 24 March 2003Reply With Quote
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Baby boomer, 7 hunting trips in Africa and plenty more to come.. Big Grin Cool


Христос воскрес..!
 
Posts: 3805 | Location: Vell, I yust dont know.. | Registered: 27 March 2005Reply With Quote
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Boomer alright
Been in Africa , first time was the best memory
Second best was on the day of my 50th with tracking big ancient bull the day before and connecting next day


" Until the day breaks and the nights shadows flee away " Big ivory for my pillow and 2.5% of Neanderthal DNA flowing thru my veins.
When I'm ready to go, pack a bag of gunpowder up my ass and strike a fire to my pecker, until I squeal like a boar.
Yours truly , Milan The Boarkiller - World according to Milan
PS I have big boar on my floor...but it ain't dead, just scared to move...
 
Posts: 11698 | Location: In mountains behind my house hunting or drinking beer in Blacksmith Brewery in Stevensville MT | Registered: 27 December 2012Reply With Quote
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I am a Baby.

Attested to by most of my friends.

Mentally, I am stuck at 13!

Seriously though, I do know many young people here who hunt.

They are in their 20s-30s.


www.accuratereloading.com
Instagram : ganyana2000
 
Posts: 53993 | Location: Dubai, UAE | Registered: 08 January 1998Reply With Quote
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I’m a Baby Boomer, born in 1947. Five safaris to Namibia, each better than the previous one. After the first four trips, ran out of space for Euro Mounts. In last May 2019 trip, took lots of trophy pictures and had Costco enlarge them and mount them on acrylic backing. Striking momentos at a very reasonable price.


Jesus saves, but Moses invests
 
Posts: 1129 | Location: Chicago, IL | Registered: 02 May 2008Reply With Quote
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I'm a genx....barely!

Hunted Zim twice , Namibia, Tanzania and probably 15_trips to South Africa. Gonna go to Zambia and Moz.....one of these days.

I'll keep going until I run out of money or Africa runs out of buffalo!

.
 
Posts: 38355 | Location: Crosby and Barksdale, Texas | Registered: 18 September 2006Reply With Quote
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I'm Gen X. Six safaris, 7th was supposed to be this year.

Gen Z is 1997-2012, I have 2 girls & 1 boy in that bracket (18, 16, 13) and they all hunt. A 4th girl, who's my daughter's friend, goes with us and hunts as well. My 2 oldest have been to Africa.

A lot of my Gen X friends are taking their kids hunting, so at least a lot of Gen Z are getting exposed to it. As stated above, who knows whether they stick with it if Dad isn't planning/organizing but at least they won't have a negative attitude towards hunting.
 
Posts: 151 | Location: CA.  | Registered: 26 October 2016Reply With Quote
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I'm 80 but not too silent. Been to Africa once, going again in May 21, and am planning on a buffalo hunt, probably in 2022. Before I get too old.


jmbn
Old and in the way
 
Posts: 140 | Location: sacramento CA | Registered: 02 October 2013Reply With Quote
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I am now 57 years old. My first african hunt was when I was 28. Paid by myself. My son was 12. Still paid by myself Wink Seems they are getting younger Cool


Good hunting
Carl Frederik
 
Posts: 447 | Location: Denmark | Registered: 04 March 2007Reply With Quote
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Millennial here. But I got two other Millennials to hunt Africa, the one didn't even own a rifle. Immediately bought a CZ 550 375 for the trip. Only will hunt Africa. The other guy has taken up hunting in North America now, and actually took a hunting trip to New Zealand. Hope to convince a few more people to go with me.
 
Posts: 38 | Registered: 29 December 2018Reply With Quote
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Boomer... 26 safaris, 11 countries. Two planned for next year, Botswana and Tanzania, Ethiopia on the books for 2022. Gonna keep going til I can't.

Have taken my Millennial son on a number of international trips... he enjoys seeing new cultures as much as the hunting.


On the plains of hesitation lie the bleached bones of ten thousand, who on the dawn of victory lay down their weary heads resting, and there resting, died.

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch...
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son!
- Rudyard Kipling

Life grows grim without senseless indulgence.
 
Posts: 6994 | Location: Victoria, Texas | Registered: 30 March 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by LivingTheDream1:
Millennial here. But I got two other Millennials to hunt Africa, the one didn't even own a rifle. Immediately bought a CZ 550 375 for the trip. Only will hunt Africa. The other guy has taken up hunting in North America now, and actually took a hunting trip to New Zealand. Hope to convince a few more people to go with me.


Good on you our Millennial friend! Keep up the good work recruiting more of your young friends for the sake of our hunting heritage. Well done.
 
Posts: 2016 | Location: Colorado | Registered: 26 May 2010Reply With Quote
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I went to RSA at 34 years oldwith my wife who was 32 at the time. PH and family loved having someone close to their age. We've been friends ever since.
 
Posts: 1287 | Location: NC | Registered: 10 June 2002Reply With Quote
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First trip at 30, another booked next year (I'll be 34). While I have a handful of friends within 10 years of me who hunt locally, finances are a primary deterrent to them hunting internationally or in any professionally guided fashion.
 
Posts: 1205 | Location: Shelton, CT | Registered: 22 February 2010Reply With Quote
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Picture of ledvm
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I was born in Feb 1965 thus I guess I am an Xer. Always thought I was the last year of Boomers.

Been many times. Last trip in June 2019. Will ‘likely’ go in 2020.


____________

Lane

Progressives don’t just have disdain for Conservatives...they loathe the very ground they walk on.
 
Posts: 27694 | Location: Gainesville, TX | Registered: 24 December 2006Reply With Quote
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damn I feel young - millennial and started 25 years ago.
 
Posts: 2505 | Location: North | Registered: 24 May 2007Reply With Quote
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Picture of JBrown
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quote:
Originally posted by A.Dahlgren:
damn I feel young - millennial and started 25 years ago.


Dang, so how old are you? You must have stated hunting Africa when you were hardly into your teenage years.


Jason

"You're not hard-core, unless you live hard-core."
_______________________

Hunting in Africa is an adventure. The number of variables involved preclude the possibility of a perfect hunt. Some problems will arise. How you decide to handle them will determine how much you enjoy your hunt.

Just tell yourself, "it's all part of the adventure." Remember, if Robert Ruark had gotten upset every time problems with Harry
Selby's flat bed truck delayed the safari, Horn of the Hunter would have read like an indictment of Selby. But Ruark rolled with the punches, poured some gin, and enjoyed the adventure.

-Jason Brown
 
Posts: 5709 | Location: The North Slope, Alaska(formerly SW Wyoming) | Registered: 22 December 2003Reply With Quote
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