The Accurate Reloading Forums
Point of impact changes

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http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/1021043/m/9441021902

10 March 2015, 01:16
marquezlc
Point of impact changes
I am reasonably new to bow hunting, maybe about 3-4 years. I started sighting in my new bow about an month or two ago. I took my time setting each pin. I took about two days on each pin before moving on to the next. I was shooting every day for about a month, and had my sights set right where I wanted them out to about 60 yards. I didn't shoot for about two weeks due to a work related trip.Now my point of impact seems to have changed. I am trying to make sure my anchor point is the exact same every time but all my pins seem to shoot high. I am seeking advice on adjusting for the new point of aim. Should I keep trying to see if it is my form or another factor or should I just adjust the sights to get me where I want? Is sighting in a bow like sighting in a rifle, is it once and done unless you switch scopes or ammo, or is the sight setting on a bow a constantly changing thing? Also how long should a new string take to break in. And counld this be a factor? Thank you
10 March 2015, 02:15
ZekeShikar
New bow = new string and this could be your problem. Even the fastflight strings I've used take a little break-in.

By the way, a rifle should be checked on a regular basis too. "One and done" is NEVER the right thinking with gun or bow.

Re-sight it in and keep shooting.
Zeke
19 March 2015, 05:05
bo-n-aro
I would have to say it is your anchor point and or grip. Even if you use a peep, the slightest change in either will cause your aim point to change.
Practice a few feet in front of your target by closing your eyes, draw, anchor and release. It's all about consistency and muscle memory.
19 March 2015, 21:17
ZekeShikar
quote:
Originally posted by bo-n-aro:
I would have to say it is your anchor point and or grip. Even if you use a peep, the slightest change in either will cause your aim point to change.
Practice a few feet in front of your target by closing your eyes, draw, anchor and release. It's all about consistency and muscle memory.


Yep, that too could be the biggest issue, especially for a newer shooter.

Zeke