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Whats a good setup for a beginner with a $500 price range? Elk, deer, and antelope will be my targets. I have access to multiple sporting goods stores (Scheels, Big Bear, and others around Great Falls/Helena/Choteau areas)

I was looking at PSE G-force and Firestorm Kits and they seem to offer what I'm looking for, but open to others.


"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then is not an act, but a habit"--Aristotle (384BC-322BC)
 
Posts: 749 | Location: Central Montana | Registered: 17 October 2005Reply With Quote
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I think that trying to save money on a bow is false economy - you'll be spending more money on a better bow very soon.

I recommend a Mathews Switchback for beginners. It will cost a lot more than $500 by the time you get it set up.

Getting the bow that is the most forgiving, easiest to shoot and easy to tune is even more important to a beginner than to an expert.

FWIW, though, my brother John likes his PSE.


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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I agree with Don about getting a good bow in the beginning. I base my observation on having been a competitive pistol shooter and watching new shooters buy less than the best to start and always ending up trading up at a financial loss.


Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid....John Wayne
 
Posts: 28 | Location: Maine | Registered: 15 October 2005Reply With Quote
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I got a Switchback as my fist bow and absolutely love it. Very comfortable and forgiving. I shot a bunch of other bows before buying and the Switchback was an easy choice.
 
Posts: 2153 | Location: Southern California | Registered: 23 October 2005Reply With Quote
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quote:
Getting the bow that is the most forgiving, easiest to shoot and easy to tune is even more important to a beginner than to an expert.


Very, very true!

My first compound is a Switchback. I was shooting like a pro (figuratively at least) right off the bat. 4 to 6" groups at 40 yards were easy. Talk about good for the ego. Smiler

Cheers,
Canuck
 
Posts: 7118 | Location: The Rock (southern V.I.) | Registered: 27 February 2001Reply With Quote
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Hello the campfire:
my suggestion is to look for a good used bow of a quality above what you can afford new. A lot of hunters trade for the newest thing every year and you can pick up a great buy if you look around. It will usually cime with a sight and rest to start with. Use the money saved to have it tuned and set up for you. By saving a little on the bow, you can get the sight and arrow rest you like if you think you need to change. I have shot my bow for three years ( Mathews Solocam 65#, not sure of the let off) and doubt that I will change except for a traditional if I find one I can't live without.
Good Shooting
Judge Sharpe


Is it safe to let for a 58 year old man run around in the woods unsupervised with a high powered rifle?
 
Posts: 486 | Registered: 16 December 2004Reply With Quote
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I've done so well buying on ebay, I doubt I'll ever but 'new' again, although one of the bows I bought on ebay was NIB .... at about 25% of retail. Big Grin
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: out behind the barn | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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I would suggest that you find a local pro shop and go shoot several of their bows -- then buy what works best for you regardless of the name. There are many many great bows available on the market today -- buy what feels and shoots the best for you. A relationship with a pro shop for a beginner can be a very positive thing as to setting up your bow and getting every thing dialed in -- that said -- as you advance with your experience there are cheaper ways to go if you get what I mean. Just because some bow manufactures spend vastly more on advertising than their competitors does not make them a better bow – buy/shoot what works for you.


OMG!-- my bow is "pull-push feed" - how dreadfully embarrasing!!!!!
 
Posts: 920 | Location: 8K Ft in Colorado | Registered: 10 December 2005Reply With Quote
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I have shot archery for years but I just did my first Archery upgrade since 1994. All I can say is WOW what a differance. I purchased a new Hoyt Tricon XL. Just a note. In my owners manual it stated that any internet sales imideatly voided the factory warranty. The bow must show proof of purchase from a authorised pro shop. My Hoyt shoots awsome. I am not really convinced about the arrows recomended by the pro shop staff. I purchased Easton Axis Full Metal Jacket 300's. They seam to be very fragile if the hit any thing other than the targets. But with that much speed and energy maby most arrows will fail. Even skipping across flat ground. This is the first bow I have used a release with and when I get tired I have an ocational case of target anticipation. I let two fly in to my back yard cinder block wall and one bounced down the ground on the archery range. The block wall arrows i expected to fail but o not the skipper.

Will
 
Posts: 581 | Location: Mesa, AZ | Registered: 08 May 2006Reply With Quote
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I use these to build a 500 grain arrow. The only failures have been due to Robin Hoods.

They make a 500 grain total arrow weight at 28.5" shaft length.

They are actually Carbon Express Terminator Hunter arrows.

Anything with aluminum in it will not take the abuse that these toughest carbon arrows. They are truly amazing.

Carbon Express is coming out with a BullDog collar for the Carbon maxx arrows that even solves the Robin Hood issue, but the collars don't fit the Terminator Hunters.


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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Thanks Don_G

I am going to leave my setup as is untill the end of my hunt and then try some new arrows.

In my old bow I shot XX78 Super Slam 2512's
with 125 grain Muzzy's

My Axis FMJ arrows make 503 grains with 100 grain points but they are 31.5 inches long fron the end of the nock to the cut. I recorded 271 ft/sec at the bow shop to day.
I shot one of those video computer screens today for the first time. It had recorded fotage of the deer with a scoreing system and showed the shot placment and vitals location after the shot. It was alot of fun! Pretty good refresher for locating the vitals at odd angles.

Semper Fi amd Safe Hunting

Will
 
Posts: 581 | Location: Mesa, AZ | Registered: 08 May 2006Reply With Quote
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31.5" Why so long?

The terminator shafts are 12 gpi, so that'd add about 36 grains to the arrow weight. So you'd be about 535 with them with a 100 grain head.

I tend to find that I get good fixed broadhead flight if I keep the speed blow 270, so I'd consider the extra weight a good thing from your bow.

At 270 and above my arrows get squirrely in the slightest wind with a fixed bh.


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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They are so long because I am 6'3" and my draw is 31" I don't leave much shaft on the bench after I cut them. My Axis FMJ's are 11.6gpi.

Semper Fi and Safe Hunting
Will
 
Posts: 581 | Location: Mesa, AZ | Registered: 08 May 2006Reply With Quote
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My draw is 30.5", but my arrows are only 28.5".

I guess my QAD UltraRest acts more like an overdraw than your rest.


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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My draw is 30.5", but my arrows are only 28.5".

I guess my QAD UltraRest acts more like an overdraw than your rest.



My draw and arrow length is the exact same as yours Don. My Ripcord rest must be set up in the same spot as your QAD.

The wood arrows for my recurve are about 30.5".

Cheers,
Canuck
 
Posts: 7118 | Location: The Rock (southern V.I.) | Registered: 27 February 2001Reply With Quote
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Correction to my draw lenght. It is 33.5" not 31.5" as stated above. I am shooting a Trophy Ridge Drop Zone rest. I guess I am a little long in the arms.
 
Posts: 581 | Location: Mesa, AZ | Registered: 08 May 2006Reply With Quote
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458Lottfan, that makes a lot of sense. Arms like this guy! troll

Canuck,
You gonna get out in the woods with that bow, or just admire it? stir


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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I guess I am a little long in the arms.


I'll say! I am 6'2" and have to wear tall size shirts for the sleeves to fit. Smiler

Don must have longer than average arms for his height too.

Don....just admiring it so far. Still don't have any BH's. Flanagan's deer camp next weekend though, and Kevin's got some Steelforce BHs in for both Tim and I...will get them tuned on Saturday. Smiler Bow season is Dec 1 to 20 so I've still got a little time...

Cheers,
Canuck
 
Posts: 7118 | Location: The Rock (southern V.I.) | Registered: 27 February 2001Reply With Quote
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Yep, I had a Doc tell me once that I had the torso of a man 6' 2", but I'm bandy-legged. I have to get Tall shirts as well.

Good luck at deer camp, and tell Tim Hi for me.


Don_G

...from Texas, by way of Mason, Ohio and Aurora, Colorado!
 
Posts: 1645 | Location: Elizabeth, Colorado | Registered: 13 February 2004Reply With Quote
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Originally posted by Woodmnctry:
I would suggest that you find a local pro shop and go shoot several of their bows -- then buy what works best for you regardless of the name. There are many many great bows available on the market today -- buy what feels and shoots the best for you. A relationship with a pro shop for a beginner can be a very positive thing as to setting up your bow and getting every thing dialed in -- that said -- as you advance with your experience there are cheaper ways to go if you get what I mean. Just because some bow manufactures spend vastly more on advertising than their competitors does not make them a better bow – buy/shoot what works for you.




This is the way to go.Different bows and their owners are just like trucks.Some like Chevys........some like Fords etc.Shoot a few and make your own decision.If you can,try to get in the store when they arent too busy.The pro then can spend more quality time with you.
 
Posts: 66 | Location: manchester md | Registered: 15 March 2006Reply With Quote
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