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What is a good bow to start with?
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I have done all my hunting with with a rifle for years, but would like to try something new. What would be a good bow for an adult beginner?
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Sturgis | Registered: 22 May 2006Reply With Quote
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If I were you I would go to a local archery shop.If they have a shooting range you can shoot a few different bows.You will see and feel different brands and models.Find one that feels right for you.Dont let someone tell you that brand X is best for you.Find out for yourself.

Plus...if you are a beginner Im sure you will have a bunch of questions.Most shops have very experienced shooters.Just ask them what ya need to know.

Shooting and hunting with a bow is alot of fun.Good luck!
 
Posts: 66 | Location: manchester md | Registered: 15 March 2006Reply With Quote
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Good advice by mdmike. It's good to support the small local pro-shops too. There'as more to life than just saving a few $$$. Build a realationship with your pro-shop. For the few extra bucks you'lll gain years of knowledge.

You'll learn faster with a simple mid range compound bow set up for hunting NOT 3-d.

You be on the road to inner peace ansd harmony with the universe with a trad bow Big Grin


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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I ALWAYS recommend that someone new to archery starts out with a pistol grip type recurve bow and in a lightweight poundage. Learn the basics and have some fun at it. Nearly all the proshops are going to nearly force you into a full blown compound set-up which will teach you almost NOTHING about archery. All the guys that I know that strated out with compounds want to shoot my stickbows when we go to a shoot and I can't hardly get them to let me have them back, because as they say "this is FUN". New guys with compounds spend more time tinkering with their equipment than shooting and the answer to all problems is more new equipment. If the wheely bow guys ask me what happened if I missed, the answer is always, "I missed", if I ask them, the answer is always,"oh this rest, sight, bow, release etc. is no good", I guess you need to have the very latest model for them to be of any use!
 
Posts: 421 | Location: GA, USA | Registered: 15 July 2002Reply With Quote
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Since you are just starting out, you probably would be best suited by getting a quality compoiund that feels good to you. Go to your local dealer and find a bow that is comfortable w/ you when you draw it.

Recurves are a pain to learn how to shoot consistently and I personally feel beghinners should start w/ a compund and work toward a recurve if they so desire. A recurve can turn someone away from archery very quickly if they've never experienced the ease of accuracy w/ a modern compound.

Good Luck

Reloader
 
Posts: 4146 | Location: North Louisiana | Registered: 18 February 2004Reply With Quote
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Most folks that try bowhunting give it up in the less than two years. Starting with a compound and working towards a recurve dosn't work AT ALL. Its the same as trying to learn to ride a bike with training wheels, it never happens UNTIL you take off the wheels. I know lots of guys that bought a set-up compound and have shot and hunted with it for a few years and know absolutely NOTHING about archery. If you want it easy, you might just as well stay with the rifle.
 
Posts: 421 | Location: GA, USA | Registered: 15 July 2002Reply With Quote
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Richard P, I read all these replies, you got your best advice from Mdmike, Boss and Reloader -IMO that is.
Teaching kids to shoot is a lot of fun. Most come to me with recurve experience and little or no training. I put a little Mathews Genisi in their hands, show them how to hold it properly and use a release. Then we move on to a peep and single pin fiber optic sight...WOW! They really get pumped when they find that they can actually hit what they are aiming at - at will.
My point is simple. Recurves are beautiful works of art and fun to shoot. You'll need to be dedicated and understand your range limitations.
If your interested in hunting or targets (3d, whatever) then I recommend a good fully adjustable compound bow that you can custom fit to your body. Buy the minimum poundage allowed to hunt in your state (40/50, 50/60, etc.) and have the dealer throw in some leasons.
It can be as gadget oriented as YOU want it to be or not.
It's your hobby. Ask yourself what you want and then head for the pro shop. Good Luck !


Elk, it's what's for dinner..
 
Posts: 260 | Location: So. Oregon | Registered: 11 June 2004Reply With Quote
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Rick - I completely agree that to really undestand archery one needs a bow that shoots an arrow with "ARCH".

There are not many people that have the metal toughness to INVEST the time with trad gear when they start.

ANYONE with basic motor skills a level above a potato can get on target very quickly with a compound. Hence they tend to get "hooked" on bowhunting bit faster.


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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Laughing here!

Hey, I have a novel idea!
Rich, go to your pro shop and try both compouund and traditional - Buy what YOU want and be happy!

I think I'll go glue some plastic feathers on those carbon thingy's lol


Elk, it's what's for dinner..
 
Posts: 260 | Location: So. Oregon | Registered: 11 June 2004Reply With Quote
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The traditional bow is a great starting point but is much harder to become proficient with so be prepared to shoot almost every day. Tuning one for perfect flight is very time consuming and it takes a lot of knowledge and sometimes money when the wrong arrow or points are chosen. Most archery shops today know nothing about the recurve or longbow. You have to research and study everything about them and how to tune or you will be in a constant slump when the arrows wave all over the place and you can't hit anything. A sure way to become a quitter unless you have the time and energy to devote to them.
I see everyone suggests starting with a very light weight! I don't! You have to make the decision based on your own physical strength and how a bow weight feels to you. This is really true with the recurve because after a while, too light of a bow will make it very hard to release the string cleanly. This is not true with a longbow because of the stack all of them have.
Even with a compound and release, too light or too much letoff can let you relax too much at full draw and take away the back tension needed to shoot good. You have to use your muscles to shoot a bow and if your muscles are too strong for the bow you will have trouble.
The biggest mistake I made with my first hunting bow was to let the guy behind the counter talk me into too light of a bow. It was 45# and shots at deer were like watching a slow motion movie. I did OK but penetration and range really sucked. I found I had no trouble shooting up to a 75# recurve. I settled on 62# and killed a ton of deer. My accuracy and killing power doubled in the field. I now shoot 76 to 82# compounds and I am 68 years old.
What I am saying is to base your choice on your own strength and not what someone else says to do. You MUST go to a shop and shoot different bows to evaluate what you are comfortable with. If you are not strong now, start light and remember, you will get stronger so you will eventually get a stronger bow.
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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Start light (45 - 50 lbs)...learn to shoot...get down the basics and them move up in power and speed if you really need to do so for your type of hunting....JMHO!!


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Posts: 858 | Location: MD Eastern Shore | Registered: 24 May 2005Reply With Quote
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Richard P.

There isn't a one size fits all answer for your question.

The biggest thing YOU need to decide is if you want to go the compound or traditional route.
That being said. It is two totally different approaches to bowhunting.

I am guessing that you live in Sturgis, SD. I am right down the road in Spearfish. If I am wrong please disregard the retail suggestion I provided below.

If you go the compund route, there are a couple of places to check. Scheels in RC has a pretty good selection of bows in the midrange price. Black Hills archery carries the full line of Mathews, great bows but expensive. Gunsmoke in Belle Fourche handles Hoyt and there is another guy in Belle Fourche that just started up and I can't remember his name for the life of me.

If you go the compound route make sure you get a longer axle to axle length. The longer bows are more forgiving, and easier to shoot. I would suggest something in the 36-40" range.

If you decide you want to go Traditional, send me a PM and I will personally help you get started.

But for basics, Don't get too heavy a bow. I would suggest the 50-60# range.

Learn the basics of shooting a bow, and everything will fall into place. You will be ready to enjoy bowhunting.
 
Posts: 2034 | Location: Black Mining Hills of Dakota | Registered: 22 June 2005Reply With Quote
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I notice that every single person the recommends starting with a compound does it for the same reason its EASIER. Over my lifetime I have discovered that the things that are easy are worth doing. As to the difficulty of setting up a new trade bow, the last one I got I was shooting very well about ten minutes after I recieved it, of course it did take another 20 minutes or so to get it fine tuned and that was without ANY tools. A custom recurve is a work of art created by a craftsman. A compound is a collection of parts assembled by a minimum wage laborer. I have been shooting bows for about 50 years and have owned and shot, flatbows, longbows, recurves and compounds. The big difference between shooting stickbows and compounds? Stickbows are people oriented compounds are equipment oriented.
 
Posts: 421 | Location: GA, USA | Registered: 15 July 2002Reply With Quote
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The big difference between shooting stickbows and compounds? Stickbows are people oriented compounds are equipment oriented.


A recurve or a longbow is all you. A compound is ony about 20% you. Wink

So when are you heading down undr? Isn't your season about ready to start?


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Originally posted by Blacktail53:
Laughing here!

Hey, I have a novel idea!
Rich, go to your pro shop and try both compouund and traditional - Buy what YOU want and be happy!
lol
Good idea if you ask me.Like I said earlier......dont let someone else TELL you what to buy.Listen to some advise......ask some questions.....and make your own decision.Asking someone else which bow is better for you is like asking what cal. rifle is best for you when hunting whitetails.

Also......shooting a compound with sites and a peep sight will be a faster way to shoot consistently and accurately.At least that is my opinion.
 
Posts: 66 | Location: manchester md | Registered: 15 March 2006Reply With Quote
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I would hate to see this thread degenerate into a traditional vs compound thread.

A newbie is interested in bowhunting, let's try to give him some good advice.

If he chooses one over the other that's his decision.

I made my decision on what equipment to hunt with, but it isn't neccessarily right for him.

It all stills comes down to the guy holding the bow.
 
Posts: 2034 | Location: Black Mining Hills of Dakota | Registered: 22 June 2005Reply With Quote
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loboga, buddy...you say all this stuff about training wheels and crud, then you say that people start w/ compounds because it's easier. Umm, DUH!!! That's WHY they start w/ compounds. you want someone to start w/ a recurve? That's like starting on a Harley then working down to a bicycle w/ training wheels. I think your reasoning is very inconsistent and way off, IMHO. I think it IS indeed best to start out w/ a compound bow, then move UP to recurve. I'm only 16, so i'm not a pro. But have done a good deal of bow shooting. at school in p.e., we did recurves for a few months. Got pretty good with one, too. my friend (18) has a compound and a recurve, and has his own target range at his house. he started out w/ a light compound a few years back, and now uses only a recurve, and has killed several deer w/ his recurve. He uses that more than his .30-30. But, my point is, he worked UP to the recurve and that's about all he shoots now. better to start w/ a compound.


Gun control is hitting your target.
 
Posts: 128 | Registered: 14 April 2006Reply With Quote
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I'm not going to suggest what type of bow to choose. Choose the kind of hunting you want to do. If you have the skill/patience to get within 15 yards of your quarry in the first season then a recurve will suit you well. The first season you won't be able to shoot much beyond 15 yards. If you want to shoot from the ground ie:stalking and ambushing then a recurve will suit you. If you want to hunt from a tree and shoot out to 30 yards right away then a compound is your choice. You have to learn a lot about your quarry before you can get within 20 yards or less, so if you don't want to invest that kind of time then by all means get a compound. Also if you have less time to practice a compound is for you.

the chef
 
Posts: 2763 | Registered: 11 March 2004Reply With Quote
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Exactly! Most working stiffs have to commute to work and the days are shot. I am retired and still do not have the time for the long bow or recurve. I can still shoot them fair but it is amazing how rusty a guy can get. I get up at sunrise, spin twice and the sun is going down.
I agree that one should start with the compound and step UP to the recurve. Ya just gotta have both!
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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All it takes to learn to shoot a recurve is 2 hours one night a week plus about 2 or 3 sessions of 15 minutes per week. Don't practice long-practice well.

the chef
 
Posts: 2763 | Registered: 11 March 2004Reply With Quote
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Chef is right it DOSN'T take a alot of practice to get or stay good with a recurve. Stacey Groscup used to do exhibitions where he would shoot aspirins and such thrown into the air, hit up usually 2 out of 3 and he said that at times he hadn't touched that recurve in months! I will say shooting a compound with sights, dosn't take a lot of practice, when I shot one, I could set it aside for months, pick it up and shoot three arrows touching each other and set it back down, there wasn't any point in shooting it more and there wasn't any fun in it. When I am shooting a stickbow, my shooting may take a few shots to get back on,2-3, if I haven't shot for a while(months) and my shooting tends to get worse if I shoot a lot since its all in the concentration, when shooting instinctive. In MANY situations the stickbow is a BETTER hunting weapon than a compound. I have killed lots of animals that a guy with a compound wouldn't even of thought of getting a shot at.
beretta, don't take this as an insult, because we have all been there. I can remember when I was 16 and knew it all, but durn in all those years since then I must have forgot a lot of it, cause I hardly know anything now. In my experience however you could shoot a compound forever and never work up to a recurve, you could learn about archery and learn how to shoot a recurve and then work into a compound in about five minutes. In simplest terms, it depends on what the draw is for you personally, are you a hunter or a shooter? I'm not saying there is anything wrong with either one.
 
Posts: 421 | Location: GA, USA | Registered: 15 July 2002Reply With Quote
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What you forget is that you are an archer with trained thoughts and muscles most likely from years of practice. You never lose it but can get rusty with a recurve, more so if you shoot instinctive.
We are dealing with a rank beginner that may have never drawn a bow and needs coaching from someone that knows how. Then those muscles need to develop the memory and gain strength. You have to also remember that the muscles used for archery are seldom used for anything else during the day. They must be developed using the proper form or all is wasted.
It is much easier to find help and develop form with a compound. Then the step into a recurve becomes easier.
You never said how many years Groscup has shot or how many millions of arrows he has shot. He has done the time and you are trying to simplify it to a beginner.
I have a launcher to throw targets in the air. Come over and see what you can do!
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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It took me a few years to feel good about my skills with a recurve. Depending on how much time you have for practice, it can take a long time to get "good". Since then, however, I can pick it up and shoot it well, even after not shooting it for months (and over a year in one case).

Despite all that, on average, I still recommend recurves over compounds for beginning archers and prospective bowhunters. I think it makes more sense to progress from trad gear to tech gear, and learn the art before the pure science. I also think developing form and learning to understand arrow flight and trajectory, is better done with the recurve. If it is important to the individual to be hunting with a bow in a short(ish) amount of time, however, I will steer them to a compound. If you don't have the time, or are not prepared to spend the time to get proficient with a stick-bow, you really oughtn't be out hunting with it.

JMHO,
Canuck
 
Posts: 7118 | Location: The Rock (southern V.I.) | Registered: 27 February 2001Reply With Quote
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Originally posted by calgarychef1:
All it takes to learn to shoot a recurve is 2 hours one night a week plus about 2 or 3 sessions of 15 minutes per week. Don't practice long-practice well.

the chef


Whith Trad gear, that will get one on paper, YES. It takes a little more time & effort to shooting 1" groups at hunting distences CONSISTANTLY, hot or cold, morning or night year after year.

I believe it's all about the muscle memory conditioning...something that you just have to do. Further the more time you invest the more you can get away with when taking time off.

There are a lot of guy that put years off daily shooting in that can take time off and still have thier eye. But, they have a foundation to fall back on.

A newbie can get away with that with a compound bow due to the "gadget help". But, that won't hasppen with a recurve.


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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Your all off topic. Start your own thread...

Richard, go here : http://www.huntersfriend.com/
Look at the right side column. There are lot's of good articles for someone that wants to break into "bow hunting." Also some great help's on picking a bow.
I hope you find what your looking for. BT53


Elk, it's what's for dinner..
 
Posts: 260 | Location: So. Oregon | Registered: 11 June 2004Reply With Quote
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The topic is:

quote:
What would be a good bow for an adult beginner?


If the OP doesn't know the reasons differant bows are choosen, how is he going to know which bow type he should concider?



This IS the topic.


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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This always reminds me of the first Jennings compound my friend bought. (The old 4 wheel thing.) I thought it was an abortion and made fun of it until I shot it. The trouble was, the thing kept breaking limbs and Jennings just started sending the limbs to him. He had just put new ones on and we didn't have a scale so he just turned in the limb bolts the same number of turns he used to remove the old ones.
We took turns shooting it for 8 hours and could not tune it. I kept asking what weight it was so he bought a scale on the way home.
That thing was on 92# and we never noticed the difference. And it didn't break! The max weight was 70#.
Then there was the time we drove to PA and he was walking with an arrow in one hand and the bow in the other. He cut the string and the thing unwound way down the game lands road.
He was a great shot but would get buck fever and one day he shot at 12 deer from 10 to 20 yd's and missed all of them.
But then again, all the best target archers I knew in those days could not hit a deer either.
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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As a relatively new bowhunter myself, I feel somewhat qualified to answer your question. I started bowhunting about four years ago.

I read a ton - there are some great bowhunting forums around and tons of magazines, etc.- but lots of the talk is just that. Talk. There is a ton of pressure to get the newest and hottest thing out. Most of which is totally unnecessary.

I went to every local shop I could. Tried all the new equipment - compounds, that is. Compounds are much easier to become proficient with than traditional, IMHO. I'd start with a compound, then move to traditional if you want to go that route. I picked a bow I liked and was comfortable with. There are a ton of great compounds out there today.

Compounds can get pricey quickly - a top-of-the-line compound with all the accessories can easily run $1000 and more. It is not necessary to start with a new bow, BTW. There are great deals to be had on year old or two year old equipment that someone has traded on the hottest, newest thing. A good bow shop will gladly get you set up on a used outfit and get you tuned correctly and on your way.

I say start with a compound because it is relatively easy to get decent with a compound. That makes is fun early on. You'll get better and better with some practice. You'll be good enough to hunt out to 30 yrds after 200-300 shots of practice. With more practice, you'll get even better and can stretch your range a little.

Harvest a couple animals with your new bow. Your confidence will skyrocket. Then, if you want something more challenging, move to traditional archery in a few years. If not, then stick with compounds. I've found that I love hunting with my compound. I'll end up trying traditional some day, but for now - the thrill of getting close is enough for me. YMMV of course.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Marietta, GA | Registered: 08 April 2005Reply With Quote
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Most come to me with recurve experience and little or no training. I put a little Mathews Genisi in their hands, show them how to hold it properly and use a release. Then we move on to a peep and single pin fiber optic sight...WOW!

This is a great bow to learn with. I started all my kids with this bow and it is fun for me as well. Nice price and nice to shoot and you can set it up as any other compound.
Welcome to insanity
DOA


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Posts: 21 | Location: South Eastern PA | Registered: 19 March 2004Reply With Quote
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In my opinion, it is GOOD that a compound is easier for a beginner. We owe it to the animal we are hunting to put that arrow in the perfect spot that will kill it the quickest and most humane way possible. It's not worth hunting with a "peice of art" if you can't hit a pie plate at 25 yards with it. For hunting, I would say definitely get a compound. Now, if you're not too concerned about hunting with the bow and you just want something to shoot for fun, get whatever you want. I personally like Bowtech and Matthews, but there are lots of other good ones out there (Hoyt, Ross, Martin, etc...), all except PSE. sofa
 
Posts: 3036 | Location: Hockley, TX | Registered: 01 October 2005Reply With Quote
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The style bow that you purchase is a perosnal decision. Whatever you buy make certain that it is matches your physical makeup (draw length and weight). It is best to start with a manageable draw weight rather than purchase something that you feel you will be able to shoot in the future. Remember, this is supposed to be fun, not a test of your machismo.
 
Posts: 55 | Registered: 12 August 2005Reply With Quote
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