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Cedar arrow questions
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I'm interested in info/opinion on tapered shaft vs straight. I've read that tapered is better but that's always from sellers. Unbiased straight info anywhere?

Also, 11/32 is the diameter I am familiar with but I see a 23/64 on the market. Would the thicker arrow be disadvantage at 50# 29"draw? Does a 23/64 require special nocks, etc? surely.

fyi, I'm slowly reverting to the trad stuff I grew up with. I got my vintage Herter's bow and will probably end up with vintage Herter's cedar arrows but in research I come up with the above questions.
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: out behind the barn | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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I like shooting tapered shafts....they seem to fly better for me, I know it's probably not the scientific answer your looking for. I shoot parallel shafts too, usually for stump shooting or fluflu as tapered shafting is a more expensive and I'm running low on my tapered maple (I shoot cedar too and am looking at tapered spruce as well) and haven't found a new supplier.

It's been awhile since I've read the book, but I think Saxton Pope used tapered shafts FWIW.

-Ron
 
Posts: 178 | Location: Anchorage, Ak | Registered: 16 February 2005Reply With Quote
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OH, HORRORS GUYS. Cedar shafts no longer kill animals. Deer are tougher now and you need carbon arrows at 300 fps. And you sure can't hit anything over 10 yd's.
HEE HEE, that should start a firestorm. Don't you just love it?
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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cedar arrows Try these guys, I've heard good things about their shafts. I don't personally shoot wood, so I can't give an honest opinion about these but as a wood worker the reasons for laminating wood are sound.

the chef
 
Posts: 2763 | Registered: 11 March 2004Reply With Quote
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Those look pretty interesting. It'll be neat so see if anyone here has used them, and see what they think of them.

mike
 
Posts: 180 | Location: Bremerton, Wa | Registered: 23 February 2006Reply With Quote
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actually I'm shooting ACCs in my recurve now but I was thinkin it might be cool to kill a deer with a stone arrowhead which would require a wood arrow, probably the thicker the better.
 
Posts: 3167 | Location: out behind the barn | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Tapered POC shafts are great, but a real pain to make (probably why they cost more!), but parallel shafts will kill critters just as well. The big thing with tapered shafts is that they 'go to sleep' (ie stop their oscillations or yawing) slightly quicker than parallel shafts.
And they have somewhat greater 'pose factor', if that sort of thing is important to you. But you will get the effect you want with either.


Cheers, Dave.

Aut Inveniam Viam aut Faciam.
 
Posts: 6716 | Location: The Hunting State. | Registered: 08 March 2005Reply With Quote
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I've got some barrel tapered hickory shafts that really fly nice. They are much heavier ofcourse and spine out high. Tapers allow the arrows to get off the shelf faster(reducing drag) as they reduce contact with the riser shelf.

I also have some maples that are 700 grain shafts.

I love wood arrow however they are too high maintainence for me. I dso shoot heavy carbons most of the time. I save my woods for the eletist longbow 3-D shoots. Roll Eyes


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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quote:
Tapers allow the arrows to get off the shelf faster(reducing drag) as they reduce contact with the riser shelf.


ah ha!!!

thanks

Boss, I've never shot anything in wood but cedar. Advantage/disadvantage to heavier shafting on Illinois size whitetails?

Also, what shaft do you think best to slot and lash a stone head to?

 
Posts: 3167 | Location: out behind the barn | Registered: 22 May 2002Reply With Quote
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Heaver arrows absorb more energy than lighter ones. That enegry is used move toward the target and penitrate.

The more energy the arrow absorbs the better it works.

Speed is only one part of the equasion. Momentiun and drag are also equally important but seldom mentioned.

Wood arrow do not recover from archer's parradox as fast as carbons. The parradox uses enegry to straighten out in flight, that is more bennifically used in penitration.

Heaver arrow's increased mass insures more inetia to penitrate deeper that lighter arrows.

By absorbing more energy , less engery goes into the bow(causing noise) and the archers hand(hand shock).

The the improvement as the same be the target a deer or a buffalo.

Hardwood arrows like ash, hickory & maple are vey hard to get straight. However, they stay straight better that cedar. They are not as consistant as cedar in terms of spine & weight. One might get 12 matched cedar shafts out of 2 doz. shafts. Hardwoods one might need to go through 4 dozen shafts to do that. My hickorys yelded 10 matched shafts out of 50.

Hard wood is much heavier. Most trad guys start with arrows that are around 10gr. per # of draw weight. It's very hardto do that for a 70# recurve with cedars(700 gr. arrows)


If you can't smell his breath, your're not close enough!

 
Posts: 980 | Location: Illinois | Registered: 04 January 2003Reply With Quote
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Those are some beautiful arrow heads! You will find that they are sharper and deadlier than any steel head. They will also penetrate farther. I have made a few and you do not want to touch fresh knapped flint.
 
Posts: 4068 | Location: Bakerton, WV | Registered: 01 September 2003Reply With Quote
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I have shot both tapered and parallel shafts. I honestly couldn't tell the difference.

I prefer 11/32 shafts over 23/64. Because if I shoot parallel I use 11/32 nocks and if I take the time to taper, I use 5/16 nocks.

I used to spend a lot of time making wood arrows, but a change in job & two kids has me turning to carbonm this coming year. Once I get a recipe figured out and the bow tuned, it will be very easy to reproduce. I just used my last wooden hunting arrows on a turkey I shot last week.

I have found that making sure the bow and arrow are tuned together makes a huge difference in shootability and penetration performance.

The best site site I've ever found on tuning traditional bows is on O.L. Adcocks website.

There is nothing wrong with playing around with different arrow combinations either. kind of like finding the right load for your rifle.

If you are going to go with wood, make sure you are getting matched high quality arrows. You CAN tell difference in shooting performance. If done right the shafts are not cheap. If they are cheap shafts, then that's what they are CHEAP. I used to buy shafts in bulk. They were supposed to be matched, but out of 1000 shafts I would get about 10-15% to keep for perfectly matched hunting arrows. Other were bunched and sold, with some being kept for practice arrows.
 
Posts: 2034 | Location: Black Mining Hills of Dakota | Registered: 22 June 2005Reply With Quote
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Making your own arrows and investing in a spine tester will greatly enhance your knowledge of "what makes an arrow fly right". Rotation of the shaft will allow you to obtain slightly different spine weights dependant on the shaft grain position on the riser relative to nock position.
 
Posts: 55 | Registered: 12 August 2005Reply With Quote
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